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^Uhe 

Woman s Home Missionary^ 

Society of {he Me{hodi^ 

Episcopal Church 

FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Year 1937-1938 
Compiled by Helen E. Cox 



"For the love of Christ 

and in His Name," 

'All things whatsoever ye would 

that men should do to you. 

do ye even so to them." 



THE WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

420 PLUM STREET CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Table of Contents 

(See Index, pages 284-288) 

PAGE 

Board of Managers 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

Standing Committees of the Board of Trustees 7 

Departments 8, 123-132 

Standing Committees of the Board of Managers 8-9, 133-147 

Promotional Workers 9, 148-149 

Publications and Publicity 9, 150-153 

Bureaus 10-11, 154-230 

Schools of Missions 12-14, 146 

Conference Officers 15-31 

Workers in National Projects 32-46 

Workers in Conference Projects 47-57 

Deaconesses 58-60 

Retired Workers and On Leave of Absence 61 

Minutes of the Board of Managers 62-75 

Memorial List 75 

Annual Message of the President 76-83 

Annual Report of the Corresponding Secretary 84-91 

Auditor's Certificate 96 

Annual Report of the Treasurer 92-108 

Appropriations 109-122 

Stories of Conference Work 231-248 

Constitution and By-Laws 249-276 

Form of Bequest and Devise 277 

Articles of Incorporation 278-279 

Historical Data 280-281 

National Officers of The Woman's Home Missionary Society 282-283 



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in 2011 witli funding from 

Drew University witli a grant from the American Theological Library Association 



http://www.archive.org/details/womanshomemissio1938woma 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, Whitby Place, Sidney, Ohio 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Mrs. W. Raymond Brown, 65 Walnut Street, East Aurora, N. Y. 
Mrs. Daniel Stecker, 423 Eighth Street, Wilmette, III. 
Mrs. M. L. Robinson, 316 W. Seventy-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. D. B. Brummitt, 1010 W. Seventieth Terrace, Kansas City, Mo. 
Mrs. Anna E. Kresge, 70 W. Boston Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY 

Mrs. V. F. DeVinny, 200 S. Fairview Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY-EMERITUS 

Mrs. May Leonard Woodruff, 71 Mt. Tabor Way, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

RECORDING SECRETARY 

Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver, 3032 Washington Blvd.. Chicago, 111. 

TREASURER 

Mrs. J. H. Freeman, 84 W. Winter Street, Delaware, Ohio 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS 
Mrs. Clarence Antrim, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Mrs. F. D. Bovard, San Francisco, Calif. 
Mrs. Archer Brown, Greenwich, Conn. 
Mrs. David Dailey, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mrs. Charles Douglass, New York, N. Y. 
Miss Mary Bell Evans, Ocean Grove, N. J. 
Mrs. Thomas J. Gambill, San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Mrs. Levi Gilbert, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mrs. U. B. Gillette, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mrs. Fannie Hayes, New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. E. Huff, New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. I. D. Jones, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mrs. E. Y. King, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mrs. Frank Maize, Cleveland, Ohio 
Mrs. Edward A. Martin, Dalton, Pa. 
Mrs. E. M. Mills, Van Nuys, Calif. 
Mrs. Mary Fisk Park, Cambridge, Mass. 
Mrs. C. W. Poorman, Oak Park, 111. 
Mrs. John H. Race, New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. J. F. Shoemaker, St. Louis, Mo. 
Mrs. Claudius Spencer, Kansas City, Mo. 
Mrs. William J. Stitt, New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. Ella G. Stokes, Washington, D. C. 
Mrs. William J. Thompson, New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. S. J. Turner, Wayne, Pa. 
Mrs. Susie Aiken Winold, Ocean Grove, N. J. 
Mrs. Annie Hobbs Woodcock, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
Mrs. I. C. Woods, Omaha, Neb. 
Mrs. Wm. F. Anderson, Winter Park, Fla. 
Mrs. B. T. Badlev, Delhi, India. 
Mrs. J. C. Baker, San Francisco, Calif. 
Mrs. L. J. Birney, Pasadena, Calif. 
Mrs. Edgar Blake, Detroit, Mich. 



Mrs. Herbert Welch, Boston, Mass. 



Mrs. Wallace E. Brown, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Mrs. Charles Wesley Burns, Hatboro, Pa. 

Mrs. Wm. Burt, Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

Mrs. A. P. Camphor, East Orange, N. J. 

Mrs. Matthew W. Clair, Covington, Ky. 

Mrs. R. J. Cooke, Athens, Tenn. 

Mrs. Ralph Cushman, Denver, Colo. 

Mrs. Charles W. Flint, Atlanta, Ga. 

Mrs. Wilbur E. Hammaker, Nanking, China 

Mrs. Theodore Henderson, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mrs. Matt S. Hughes, Portland, Ore. 

Mrs. E. S. Johnson, Portland, Ore. 

Mrs. R. E. Jones, Columbus, Ohio 

Mrs. E. F. Lee, Singapore, Malaysia 

Mrs. F. D. Leete, DeLand, Fla. 

Mrs. Adna W. Leonard, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mrs. W. S. Lewis, Sioux City, Iowa 

Mrs. C. E. Locke, Santa Monica, Calif. 

Mrs. Titus Lowe, Portland, Ore. 

Mrs. J. Ralph Magee, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mrs. F. J. McConnell, New York, N. Y. 

Mrs. C. L. Mead, Kansas City, Mo. 

Mrs. Geo. A. Miller, San Jose, Calif. 

Mrs. C. B. Mitchell, Pasadena, Calif. 

Mrs. Thomas Nicholson, Mt. Vernon. Iowa 

Mrs. E. G. Richardson, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mrs. I. B. Scott, Nashville, Tenn. 

Mrs. Alexander P. Shaw, New Orleans, La. 

Mrs. W. O. Shepard, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Mrs. H. Lester Smith, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mrs. J. M. Springer, Umtali, Africa 

Mrs. Homer C. Stuntz, Omaha, Neb. 

Mrs. R. J. Wade, Stockholm, Sweden 

Mrs. E. L. Waldorf, Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. F. W. Warne, Toronto, Canada 



6 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

PRESIDENT 
MRS. W. H. C. GOODE Whitby Place, Sidney, Ohio 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 
MRS. W. RAYMOND BROWN 65 Walnut Street, East Aurora, N. Y. 

MRS. DANIEL STECKER .' 423 Eighth Street, Wilmette, 111. 

MRS. M. L. ROBINSON 316 W. Seventy-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. 

MRS. DAN B. BRUMMITT 1010 W. Seventieth Terrace, Kansas City, Mo. 

MRS. ANNA E. KRESGE 70 W. Boston Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY 
MRS. V. F. DEVINNY 200 S. Fairview Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

RECORDING SECRETARY 
MRS. J. N. RODEHEAVER 3032 Washington Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

TREASURER 
MRS. J. H. FREEMAN 84 W. Winter Street, Delaware, Ohio 



MRS. J. HOWARD AKE 457 Pine Street, WilHamsport, Pa. 

MRS. H. C. BLACK 720 Locust Street, Johnson City, Tenn. 

MRS. C. P. COLEGROVE 1079 N. Marengo Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 

MRS. DAVID D. FORSYTH 123 Waverly Place, New York, N. Y. 

MRS. B. M. HOCHSWENDER 5554 Wilkins Avenue. Pittsburgh, Pa, 

MRS. ADELAIDE HUDD 2265 Carroll Road, Bay City, Mich. 

MRS. FRANKLIN F. LEWIS 437 Rock Hill Road, S., Webster Groves, Mo. 

MISS HANNAH P. MILLER 4417 Larchwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

MRS. G. BROMLEY OXNAM HI S. Forty-ninth Avenue, Omaha, Neb. 

MRS. HENRY PFEIFFER 370 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 

MRS. F. C. REYNOLDS .?09 Woodlawn Road, Baltimore, Md. 

MRS. M. C. SLUTES 1330 Michigan Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 

MRS. WM. H. VEENBOER 2701 Reeds Lake Blvd., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

MRS. FOSS ZARTMAN 1120 W. Elm Street, Lima, Ohio 



Administration. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Apportionments — 

Mrs. J. H. Freeman 
Mrs. Foss Zartman 
Mrs. Ida Jackson 
Mrs. W. J. Lydick 
Mrs. R. J. Plate 

Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C. — 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 

Mrs. H. C. Bl.\ck 

Mrs. W. Raymond Brown 

Mrs. F. D. Carroll 

Mrs. J. H. Freeman 

Mrs. H. R. Hargis 

Mrs. Maggie Simpson Matthews 

Mrs. M. L. Robinson 

Mrs. M. C. Slutes 

Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer, Member-at-large 

Building — 

Mrs. Franklin F. Lewis 
Mrs. Adelaide Hudd 

Business — 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 
Mrs. V. F. DeVinny 
Mrs. J. H. Freeman 
Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver 
Mrs. W. R.\ymond Brown 
Mrs. Anna E. Kresge 
Mrs. Adelaide Hudd 
Mrs. Wm. H. Veenboer 
Mrs. Foss Zartman 

Committee on Women's Work — 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 
Mrs. W. Raymond Brown 
Mrs. V. F. DeVinny 
Mrs. G. Bromley Oxnam 
Mrs. Daniel Stecker 

Conference Representation — 

Mrs. J. Howard Ake 
Miss Hannah P. Miller 

Co-operation with Board of Education^ 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 
Mrs. J. H. Freeman 
Mrs. G. Bromley Oxn.\m 
Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer 
Mrs. M. C. Slutes 
Mrs. Daniel Stecker 
Miss Muriel Day 

Correlation — • 

Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver 
Mrs. Daniel Stecker 
Miss Helen L. Johnson 
Mrs. Austin L. Prynn 

Council of Women for Home Missions — 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 

Mrs. V. F. DeVinny 

Mrs. J. H. Freeman 

Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver 

Mrs. M. L. Robinson 

Mrs. Dan B. Brummitt 

Mrs. David Forsyth 

Miss Hannah P. Miller 

Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer 

Mrs. F. C. Reynolds 

Miss Muriel Day 

Mrs. Arthur S. Knight 

Miss Ruth Esther Wheaton 

Mrs. May Leonard Woodruff 



Co-operation Board of Home Missions — 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 
Mrs. W. Raymond Brown 
Mrs. V. F. DeVinny 
Mrs. J. H. Freeman 
Mrs. F. C. Reynolds 
Advisory Members — - 

Miss Muriel Day 

Miss Grace G. Steiner 

Forward Looking Committee — 

Mrs. Foss Zartman 
Mrs. H. C. Black 
Mrs. V. F. DeVinny 
Mrs. Wilbur Longstreth 
Miss Ruth Esther Wheaton 
Associate Committee — 

Mrs. Arthur S. Knight 

Mrs. Austin L. Prynn 

Mrs. H. F. Young 

Interracial Commission 

(Transferred to Standing Committee of the 
Board of Managers. See Christian Citizen- 
ship, page 8) 

Mary Fisk Park Loan Fund — 

Mrs. Anna E. Kresge 
Mrs. J. H. Freeman 
Miss Muriel Day 

Pensions and Relief — 

Mrs. M. C. Slutes 
Mrs. C. p. Colegrove 
Miss Hannah P. Miller 

Place of Annual Meeting 

Mrs. David D. Forsyth 
Miss Hannah P. Miller 

Policies — 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 
Mrs. W. Raymond Brown 
Mrs. Dan B. Brummitt 
Mrs. Anna E. Kresge 
Mrs. M. L. Robinson 
Mrs. Daniel Stecker 

Program for Annual Meeting— 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 
Mrs. M. L. Robinson 
Mrs. Daniel Stecker 
Mrs. J. Howard Ake 
Mrs. G. Bromley Oxnam 
Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver 
Mrs. Foss Zartman 



Schools of Missions — 

Mrs. Dan B. Brummitt 
Mrs. C. p. Colegrove 
Mrs. F. C. Reynolds 
Miss Hannah P. Miller 
Miss Helen L. Johnson 
Mrs. Wilbur E. Longstreth 



Treasury and Appropriations- 

Mrs. W. Raymond Brown 
Mrs. J. H. Freeman 
Mrs. H. C. Black 
Mrs. Adelaide Hudd 
Mrs. Anna E. Kresge 
Mrs. Foss Zartman 



8 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Departments 

Wesleyan Service Guild 

Mrs. Merle N. English, Secretary, Madison Square Hotel, 37 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Office: 1630 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Committee — Mrs. Daniel Stecker 

MkS. J. N. RODEHEAVER 

Miss Laura May Robinson 

Young People 

Mrs. Mildred .Mien Knight. Secretary, 39 Green Village Road, Madison, N. J. 

Mrs. Harry Hamilton, Bureau Secretary, 300 Prospect Avenue, East Aurora, N. Y. 

Committee — Mrs. J. Howard Ake 

Mrs. Carl Beckberger 
Mrs. Albert Dawson 

Junior 

Mrs. Austin L. Prynn, Secretary, 26 Broad Street, Pittston, Pa. 

Mrs. Charles Smith, Bureau Secretary, 617 DeQuincy Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Committee — Mrs. Wm. H. Veenboer 
Mrs. H. F. Young 
Mrs. E. E. Blair, Jr. 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers 

Christian Citizenship 
Miss Ada Townsend, Chairman, 1719 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Mrs. W. D. Schermerhorn, Secretary, 2128 Maple Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Committee — Mrs. Dan B. Brummitt, Race Relations 

Miss Mary Ross Potter, Alcohol Education 

and Alcohol Legislation 
Mrs. Joy Elmer Morgan, Better Motion 

Pictures and Radio Programs 
Mrs. .■\nna Marden De Yo 

Associate Committee — Miss Louise E. Whitehead 
Mrs. S. S. Beggs 
Miss Eleanor F. Lewis 
Miss Jane Neill Scott 

Deaconess Work, Personnel, Emergency, and Relief 

*M1ss Grace G. Steiner, Secretary, 420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Committee — Mrs. M. C. Slutes 

Mrs. Albert T. Morgan 
Mrs. Carl Herschel 

Education and Personnel, Student Work 

Miss Muriel Day, Secretary, 420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Miss Janice Geyer. Office Secretary, 420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mrs. Myron S. Collins, Secretary of Student Work, 1910 St. Marys Avenue, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Committee — Mrs. F. C. Reynolds 

Dr. Flemmie P. Kittrell 
Mrs. Earle A. Baker 

♦Deaconess. 



Administration. 9 

Finance Methods 

Mrs. J. H. Freeman, Chairman, 84 W. Winter Street, Delaware, Oliio 
Lenten Offering — Mrs. O. D. Jacoby, 5582 Lawton Avenue, Oakland, Calif. 
Mite Boxes — Mrs. J. Arthur Jones, 376 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming, Pa. 
Permanent Missionary Fund — Mrs. John C. Rowe, 380 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 
Thank Offering— Mrs. H. G. Leonard, 222 Otis Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Spiritual Life 

Mrs. Wilbur E. Longstreth, Chairman, 403 S. Main Street, Carrollton, Mo. 

Committee — Mrs. Daniel Stecker Mrs. Merle N. English 

Mrs. F. C. Reynolds Miss Nancy Longenecker 

" Miss Hannah P. Miller Mrs. Arthur S. Knight 

Mrs. George Ruckdeschel Miss Helen L. Johnson 

Miss Doris Dennison Mrs. Austin L. Prynn 
Miss Muriel Day 

Supplies 

Ministerial — Mrs. William C. Otter, 500 W. Chelten Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Committee — Mrs. Franklin F. Lewis 

Mrs. Walter F. Ballinger 
Mrs. Charles Harting 

Institutional^Mrs. O. V. Moon, 723 Forty-fourth Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

Committee — Mrs. Franklin F. Lewis 

Mrs. H. S. Hollingsworth 
Mrs. Victor Gunn 



Promotional Workers 



Mrs. Cora Downs Stevens, Canaan, Conn. 

Miss Mary L. Holman, 5 Cunard Street, Boston, Mass. 

*Miss Helen L. Johnson, 2000 Fifth Avenue. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Publications and Publicity 

"Woman's Home Missions," "Junior Neighbors," "Annual Meeting Daily," 

"Annual Report," General Publications 

420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Miss Ruth Esther Wheaton, Editor, General Publications, "Woman's Home Missions," 

"Annual Meeting Daily" 

Miss Helen E. Cox, Assistant Editor and Editor of "Annual Report" 

Mrs. Herbert F. Young, Editor, Junior Publications, "Junior Neighbors" 

Mrs. Geo. W. Keen, Publisher and Chairman of Missionary Education 

Committee — ^Mrs. M. C. Slutes 

Mrs. Ralph H. Quinn 
Mrs. Henry W. Manz 

LITERATURE COMMITTEE 
Mrs. F. C. Reynolds Mrs. Edward R. Bartlett Mrs. A. T. Morgan 

OFFICE SECRETARY 

Mrs. M. E. Price 83 McAllister Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Committee — Mrs. J. E. Piatt 
$Deaconess. 



10 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Bureaus 

(Scholarships. $100) 

(Junior College, $150) 

(Training School Scholarships, S300) 

Name Secretary Address 

ALASKA AND THE NORTHWEST— Mrs. Frank B. Carter, 1220 Boren Avenue, Seattle Wash. 

CoMMriTEE — Mrs. Anna E. Kresge 
Mrs. E. S. Collins 
Mrs. W. J. Casselberry 

CALIFORNIA AND H.\WAII— Mrs. A. G. Scudder, 245 N. Gower Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Committee — Mrs. C. P. Colegrove 
Mrs. F. D. Bovard 
Mrs. F. J. H. Schnack 
Mrs. a. L. Schafer 

CITY MISSIONS- 
CENTRAL— Mrs. C. C. Travis 819 Judson Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Committee — Mrs. Dan B. Brummitt 
Mrs. Ralph Pierce 
Mrs. E. R. B.\rtlett 

CENTRAL WEST— Mrs. Frank L. Davis 6123 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Committee — Mrs. Franklin F. Lewis 
Mrs. J. F. Shoemaker 
Mrs. W. H. Henby 
Mrs. H. C. Mitchell 
Mrs. Geo. M. Spurlock 

EAST CENTRAL— Mrs. H. S. Metcalfe 6632 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Committee — Mrs. B. M. Hochswender 
Mrs. John Elliott 
Mrs. W. M. Harford 

FRIENDSHIP HOMES— Mrs. H. R. Hargis 200 E. Ninth Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Committee — Mrs. M. C. Slutes 

Mrs. William Jackson 
Mrs. R. B. Scott 

NORTH EAST CENTRAL— Mrs. Edwin Sebrlng. . 334 Garson Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 

Committee — Mrs. J. Howard Ake 

Mrs. J. G. Meidenbauer 
Mrs. B. D. Chamberlain 

WEST— Mrs. Frank E. Day 3439 Lyndale Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Committee — Mrs. Wm. H. Veenboer 
Mrs. W. B. Kerr 
Mrs. Lloyd Tennant 

HOSPITALS — Mrs. Robert Stewart Secaucus, N. J. 

Committee — Mrs. M. L. Robinson 

Mrs. May Leonard Woodruff 
Mrs. George Ruckdeschel 
Mrs. Wilbur E. Mallalieu 

INDIAN— Mrs. L. E. Hoover 1319 N. Thirty-eighth Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Com.mittee — Mrs. G. Bromley 0.\nam 
Mrs. R. a. Thompson 
Mrs. M. L. Cadwallader 

MEXICAN AND THE SOUTHWEST— 

Miss Laura May Robinson, 426 Lake Street, Oak Park, 111. 

Committee — Mrs. Foss Zartman 

Mrs. Charles E. Jenkins 
Mrs. John A. Betterly 



Administration. 1 1 

MOUNTAINEER— 

I. GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE— 

Mrs. Benjamin W. Meeks, 131 W. Second Street, Frederick, Md. 

Committee — Mrs. H. C. Black 

Mrs. Joy Elmer Morgan 
Mrs. B. T. Hynson 

II. KENTUCKY, MISSISSIPPI, AND NORTH CAROLINA— 

Mrs. H. S. Osborn, 208 S. Hill Terrace, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Committee — Miss Hannah P. Miller 
Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer 
Mrs. John C. Rowe 
Mrs. John Ash 

NEGRO— Mrs. Anna L. Zook 1201 State Street, Lamed, Kan. 

Committee — -Mrs. Adelaide Hudd 
Mrs. F. a. Poe 
Mrs. Addye Ware 

JOINT ADMINISTRATION WITH BOARD OF EDUCATION- 
BENNETT COLLEGE, GREENSBORO, N. C— 

Committee — Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 
Mrs. H. C. Bl.ack 
Mrs. W. Raymond Brown 
Mrs. F. D. Carroll 
Mrs. J. H. Freeman 
Mrs. H. R. Hargis 
Mrs. Maggie Simpson Matthews 
Mrs. M. L. Robinson 
Mrs. M. C. Slutes 
Mrs. Henry" Pfeiffer, Member-at large 

PUERTO RICO AND NEW YORK— 

Mrs. Raymond Meek, 17 Cotswold Way, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Committee — Mrs. David D. Forsyth 
Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer 
Mrs. Matthews S. Eylar 
Mrs. John M. Pearson 

REST HOMES— Mrs. Mary E. Stout 126 Lake Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Committee — Mrs. M. L. Robinson 
Mrs. C. p. Colegrove 
Mrs. John C. Rowe 
Mrs. Merle N. Smith 

COMMITTEES- 
DAVID AND MARGARET HOME AND SAN DIEGO ESTHER HALL— 

Chairman — Mrs. Wilmot T. Smith, 3110 Valencia 
Avenue, San Bernardino, Calif. 
Mrs. L. F. Sedgwick 
Mrs. Ona Hennings 
Trustee — Mrs. C. P. Colegrove 

THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL— 

Trustee — Mrs. F. C. Reynolds 
Miss Muriel Day 
Miss Gr.\ce G. Steiner 



Assistant to the Treasurer 

Miss Margaret Freeman 84 W. Winter Street, Delaware, Ohio 

Auditor 

Lane Stephens and Company Buffalo, N. Y. 

Attorney 
Mr. M. C. Slutes First National Bank Building, Cincinnati, Ohio 



12 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Schools of Missions 

COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Dan B. Bri'mmitt Mrs. F. C. Reynolds Miss Helen L. Johnson 

Mrs. C. p. Colegrove Miss Hannah P. Miller Mrs. Wilbur E. Longstreth 

Denominational 

Battle Ground, Ind., Northwest Indiana Conference 

Mrs. O. S. Steele 118 South Street, West Lafayette, Ind. 

Camp Asbury, Cazenovia, N. Y., Central New York Conference 

Mrs. Geo. E. Fisher DeWitt, N. Y. 

Camp Wesleyan, Silver Lake, N. Y., Genesee Conference 

Mrs. Harry Hamilton 300 Prospect Avenue, East Aurora, N. Y. 

Central West Conference School 

Miss Arsania M. Williams 4318 San Francisco Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Central Pennsylvania School, Newton Hamilton, Pa. 

Mrs. E. R. Heckman 951 Washington Avenue, Tyrone, Pa. 

Epworth Forest, North Webster, Ind., North Indiana Conference 

Mrs. C. B. Croxall 20 S. Fourteenth Street, Richmond, Ind. 

Gatlingburg, Tenn., Holston Conference 

Mrs. B. R. Stout 1621 Riverside .'\ venue, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Gulfside School, Waveland, Miss., New Orleans Area 

Miss Muriel Day 420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Lakeside, Ohio — Detroit, North-East Ohio, Ohio Conferences 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode Whitby Place, Sidney, Ohio 

Lancaster, Ohio, Ohio Conference 

Mrs. H. J. Holcombe 222 W. Fourth Street, Greenville, Ohio 

Lexington Conference School of Missions 

Mrs. E. W. Kelly 6319 Vinewood, Detroit, Mich. 

Ocean Grove, N. J.— Newark, New Jersey, New York. New York East, Philadelphia Conferences 

Mrs. H. C. Leo.vard 645 W. Ellete Street, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Conference School, Saltsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. C. C. Heckman 3351 Delaware Avenue, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Round Lake, N. Y., Troy Conference 
Mrs. Gilbert Van Auken Delmar, N. Y. 

Santa Glaus Camp, Dale, Ind., Indiana Conference 

Mrs. p. R. Pelz R. R. No. 5, Evansville, Ind. 

Washington Conference School, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Jeannette P. Jenkins 907 Jackson Street, Lynchburg, Va. 

Woman's Institute, Des Plaines, 111., Rock River Conference 

Mrs. A. O. Aldrich 839 Lake Street, Oak Park. 111. 



Schools of Missions. 13 

Interdenominational Schools and Camps 

(W. H. M. S. Representatives) 

Bethesda, Ohio 

Mrs. John R. Seward 902 N. 6th Street, Cambridge, Ohio 

Camp Merry Eye, Bethesda, Ohio 

Mrs. p. L. Stewart Lansing, Ohio 

Colorado Council of Federated Church Women, Boulder, Colo. 

Mrs. Clarence Harvey 2050 Colorado Blvd., Denver, Colo. 

Geneva School, Conference Point, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

Mrs. Leslie D. Wood 615 Thatcher Avenue, River Forest, 111. 

HlUockburn School of Missions, R. 2, Estacada, Ore. 

Mrs. K. B. Swift 3406 N. E. Fifty-eighth Avenue, Portland, Ore. 

Institute of World Missions, Chautauqua, N. Y. 

Mrs. F. C. Reynolds 309 Woodland Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Interdenominational Conference of Missions, Eaglesmere, Pa. 

Mrs. Earl E. Breeding 24 Rugby Lane, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Minnesota .School of Missions, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mrs. W. a. Anderson 1835 Morgan Avenue, N., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. Parker Jordan 855 Holly Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mountain Lake Park School, Camp Gleam for Girls, Mountain Lake Park, Md. 

Mrs. J. M. Knight 207 Roam Street, Charleston, W. Va. 

Mount Hermon Federated School of Missions, Mount Hermon, Calif. 

Mrs. F. W. Mavburv 912 Noe Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Mrs. .'V. W. McCuRDY 3090 Twenty-first Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 

Camp Quest, Mt. Hermon, Calif. 

Mrs. Earle L. Menker 1054 Longridge Road, Oakland, Calif. 

Northfield Missionary Conference, East Northfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Brubaker Ritter Hall. .Athens, Tenn. 

Camp Wesleyan, East Northfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Merrill A. Beem Pownal, Me. 

Lake Winona, Ind. 

Mrs. James O'may 3246 George Street, Chicago, 111. 

World Fellowship Conference, Camp Mattolionequay, Medford, N. J. 

Mrs. Harry H. Pratt 5504 Westfield .'\venue, Merchantville, N. J. 

Methodist Girls' Gamps 

Camp Dempster Missionary House Party, New Haven, N. Y. 

Mrs. p. F. Scripture, Dean 1229 Kumble Street, Utica, N. Y. 

Mrs. F. H. Clark, Registrar Route No. 1, Box 27, Potsdam, N. Y. 

Camp Epworth, Garden Prairie, 111. 

Mrs. T. Z. Marshall 1 Fuller Drive, Belvidere, 111. 

Camp Excelsior, Claflin College, S. C. 

Mrs. D. B. Taylor 147 N. Boulevard, Orangeburg, S. C. 

Camp Inspiration House Party, Aurora, 111. 

Mrs. Ivan Obenshain Morris, 111. 

Camp Me-Wo-Ho-Mis, Lancaster, Ohio 

Mrs. C. R. Willis 210 S. Ohio .Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 



14 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Camp Queen Esther, Idyllwlld Pines, Calif. 

Mrs. Clarenxe Crowell 14157 Sherman Way, Van Nuys, Calif. 

Camp Quest, Lake Okoboji, Spirit Lake, Iowa 

Mrs. \V. M. Hi-bbakd LeMars, Iowa 

Camps, Mt. Pleasant and Indtanola, Iowa 

Mrs. O. C. Bosh.\rt Wayland, Iowa 

Camp Wesleyan, Cazenovia, N. Y. 

Mrs. George E. Fisher DeWitt, N. Y. 

Camp Wesleyan, Janette Merrill Park, Minnetonka, Minn. 

Mrs. H. S. Lynde .^12 Xerxes -Avenue, N., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Camp Wesleyan, Silver Lake, N. Y. 

Mrs. H.arry Hamilton 300 Prospect .Avenue, East Aurora, N. Y. 

Carrie Barge House Party, Williamsport, Pa. 

Mrs. J. Howard Ake 457 Pine Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Des Plaines Girls' Retreat, Des Platnes, 111. 

Miss Clara C. Meyer 4433 N. Ashland Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Erie Conference House Party, Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa. 

Mrs. Carl S. Hart 305 Edison .Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Girls' Camp, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Miss Grace G. Sturcken 130 Glenwood Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 

Hiawatha Camp and Summer School, Lake Ariel, Pa. 

Mrs. J. .Arthur Jones 3 76 Wyoming .Avenue, Wyoming, Pa. 

Kiski Girls' Camp, Saltsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. C. C. Heckman 335 1 Delaware .Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

May Sherwood Girls' Camp, Troy, Mo. 

Mrs. Will J. Johns 6105 Simpson Terrace, St. Louis, Mo. 

Methodist Missionary Maidens, Kansas City, Mo. 

Mrs. Clarence E. Olsen Grant City, Mo. 

Philadelphia Conference, Camp Innabah, Pa. 

Mrs. H. J. Schmidt 59 Stratford .Avenue, Alden, Pa. 

Qu-Es-Ca Camp, East Bay, Bloomington, 111. 

Mrs. F. W. Distrow 409 Beecher Street, Bloomington, 111. 

3 M School, Battle Ground, Ind. 

Mrs. O. S. Steele U8 South Street, West Lafayette, Ind. 

Waldenwoods House Party, Waldenwoods, Mich. 

Mrs. Walter R. Friit 21 Rhode Island Avenue, Highland Park, Mich. 

Washington Conference Indoor Camp 

Miss Roberta Boston 1 144 Argyle Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Wo-Ho-Fo-Mi-So, Empire Grove Camp Ground, East Poland, Me. 

Miss Agnes Vose 130 Federal Street, Portland, Mo. 

Wo-Ho-Mis Lodge, Lakeside, Ohio 

Mrs. Carl S. Bechberger 2681 Ashley Road, Cleveland, Ohio 

Wo Ho Miss, Waveland, Miss. 

Miss Muriel Day 420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Wopopepa Camp, Epworth Forest Assembly, North Webster, Ind. 

Mrs. C. B.Croxall 20 S. Fourteenth Street, Richmond, Ind. 



CONFERENCE OFFICERS 



PRESIDENTS 



CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Alabama Mrs. C. R. Addington 1548 East Lake Blvd., Tarrant, Ala. 

Atlanta Mus. L. Taylor Clark University, Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. Joy Elmer Morgan, 

1222 Quincy Street, N. W.. Washington, D. C. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. R. C. Kennedy Bessemer City, N. C. 

California Mrs. A. L. Schafer 851 California Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. R. R. Willl^ms 6437 First Avenue, S., Birmingham, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. L. B. Chaloux 22 Cayuga Street, Homer, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. Blanche Curry Turner 825 High Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Lucile May Holman 4327 Page Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. W. P. Withrow 200 E. Laurel Street, Ft. Collins, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. J. L. Baptie 1117 S. Spring Avenue, Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. L. B. Jewett 8 S. Queen Street, Dover, Del. 

Detroit Mrs. Walter R. Fruit, 

21 Rhode Island Avenue, Highland Park, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Hattie R. Walker. .406 Second South Street, Morristown, Tenn. 

Erie Mrs. Bruce Wright 717 Sassafras Street, Erie, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. O. E. Williams Palatka, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. Charles Guthrie 307 N. East Street, Coudersport, Pa. 

Georgia . r Mrs. Daisy Malone 824 Cascade Avenue, S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. J. W. Helms Red Bank Station, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. R. F. Tyler La Grande, Ore. 

Illinois Mrs. F. M. Rice El Paso, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. L. T. Freeland 2051 N. Alabama Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Iowa- Des Moines Mrs. Jennie Beyer 120 .^sh Avenue, Ames, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. E. E. Beauchamp 1205 West 17th Street, Topeka, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. Frank Karnes 313 Earle Avenue, Covington, Ky. 

Le.vington Mrs. R. B. Scott 2108 W. Chestnut Street, Louisville, Ky. 

Louisiana Mrs. L. C. Ecklev 2629 Second Street, Alexandria, La. 

Maine Mrs. Willi.-^m J. Crossman 146 Gamage Avenue, Auburn, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. W. H. Veenboer (Acting President), 

2701 Reed's Lake Boulevard, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. J. H. J.\ckson 980 Euclid Street, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. E. L. Smith 265 Washington Street, Bay St. Louis, Miss. 

Missouri ■. . Mrs. F. J. Brandle 2420 Simpson .-X venue, St . Louis, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. Horace Turner 134 Avenue C, Billings, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. Bert L. Story . . . . 216 W. Twenty-second Street, Kearney, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. Anderson M. Guerin.. . .45 Western .•X venue, Morristown, N. J. 

New England Mrs. E. S. Barker 34 Shepherd Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

New England Southern Miss Sarah L. Davis 225 Baker .Street, Providence, R. I. 

New Hampshire Mus. Fred G. Croweli 51 Washington Street, Concord, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Geo. W. Yard 1205 Corbes Avenue, Neptune, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. H. F. Mercer 725 Cerrillos Road, Sante Fe, N. M. 

New York Mrs. John H. Pearson Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. George Ruckdeschel, 

3741 Eighty-fifth Street, Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

North Carolina Miss Isabelle R. Jones 331 College Street, .'\sheville, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. Glen Cas.-^dy Dickinson, N. D. 

North- East Ohio Mrs. D. W. Merrell 1348 Cleveland Avenue, Canton, Ohio 

North Indiana Mrs. C. B. Croxall 20 S. Fourteenth Street, Richmond, Ind. 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. Leslie Keyes. . .3509 Humboldt .Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Slinn. 

Northern New York Mrs. J. .A. Sypher Frankfort, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. E. R. Bartlett 723 E. Washington Street, Greencastle, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. W. M. Hubbard Le Mars, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. Porter Brown 201 W. Wilson Street, Salina, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. Ladru M. L.\yton 1812 Longview Drive, Springfield, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. T. W. Kessei.ring 1624 W. Newton -Avenue, Tulsa, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. R. L. Reed 1609 N. E. Twenty-first A\ enue, Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. W. E. M. Schi.oeman .... 2101 N. Fortieth Street, Seattle, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. Wm. E. Shappell 433 Green Lane Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. Albert T. Morgan, 

412 Maple .'Avenue, Edgewood, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. Ralph M. Pierce 724 Simpson Street., Evanston, III. 

St. Johns River Mrs. B. Frank Smith 1238 Fourth Street, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Lilla L. Odum 407 Blackwell Street, Waycross, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Daisy B. Taylor 147 N. Boulevard, Orangeburg, S. C. 

South Florida Mus. .\llora Douglas 335 |i Spruce Street, Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Southern Mrs. Hugh H. Hoff 2005 Milan Street, New Orleans, La. 

Southern California Mrs. L. F. Sedgwick 801 Orizaba .-X venue. Long Beach, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. D. E. Connett 325 S. Fifth Street, Effingham, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. Z. R. Fields Brickeys, .Ark. 

15 



16 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. Joe T. Rogers 224 N. Erie Street, Wichita, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. W. B. Crenshaw 142 Hermitage Avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Xexas Mrs. Bertha Belle Scott 2414 St. Charles Street, Houston, Tex. 

Xroy. . '. Mrs. F. H. R\T)ER 12 Prospect Street, Cobleskill, N. Y. 

Upper iowa Mrs. Earle A. Baker 804 Washington Street, Cedar Falls, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. E. F. Scarborough Holly Springs, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. R. N. Wilson 3137 Jefferson Avenue, Ogden, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. Hugh W. Hastings Bradford, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Florence D. Carroll, 

4021 Bennings Road, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

West Texas Mrs. S. A. Duncan 1310 Rosewood Avenue, Austin, Tex. 

West \'irginia Mrs. Fred Helmick 507 Fairmont Avenue, Fairmont, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. Alice E. Potter ; Belleville, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. Bertha M. C. Reeves, 

2300 Baynard Boulevard, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. Ellis L. Hoskins 3049 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. H. F. Clark 27 Darte .Avenue, Carbondale, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. Homer C. Crisman 132 S. Fifth Street, Douglas, Wyo. 



CORRESPONDING SECRETARIES 



Alabama Mrs. R. D. Murphree Oneonta, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. N. J. Crolley. . 108 McDonoiigh Boulevard, S. E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. Fred C. Hall 518 E. Twenty-first Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. Oron M. Vernon Mt. Holly, N. C. 

California Mrs. W. A. Root 1214 Hampel Street, Oakland, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. I. B. Points 830 E. Grove Street, Montgomery, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. George E. Fisher DeWitt, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. E. R. Heckman 951 Washington .\venue, Tyrone, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. B. R. Booker 413 W. Johnson Street, Sedalia, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. William Belmont 1390 Eudora Street, Denver, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. G. W. Zellhoefer 1505 S. First Avenue, Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. Mary E. J. Nichols 812 Tatnall Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Detroit Mrs. Frank J. Raymond 2112 Radcliffe Avenue, Flint, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Nannie C. Henry Box 659, Pulaski, Va. 

Erie Mrs. C. C. Davis Box 904. Union City, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. B. C. Emanuel 1718 Davis Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. D. H. Riley 88 Columbia Road, Kenmore, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. Lucille A. White, 

135 Montgomery Ferry Drive, N. E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. Ralph Spraker Box 333, Maryville, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. W. Halsey Union, Ore. 

Illinois Mrs. S. E. Oehler 315 West Maple Street, Canton, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. J. P. Robinson 3914 N. Illinois Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. Harry L. Lauer Mt. Union, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. Minnie B. Walker 824 Tennessee Street, Lawrence, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. J. W. Mealy 521 Lexington Avenue, Newport, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. Addye W. Ware 6622 Champlain Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Louisiana Mrs. A. K. Johnson Box 459, Route 4, Baton Rouge, La. 

Maine Miss H. Louise Perry Kent's Hill, Me. 

Michigan Miss Rebecca McKenzie 1624 W. Main Street, Lansing, Mich. 

Mmnesota Mrs. J. L. Nelson 967 Mound Street, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. W. P. C. Morrison .... 525 W. Pascagoula Street, Jackson, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. Ross E. Burns 1 709 Byers Avenue, Joplin, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. J. H. Bridenb.\ugh, 

^, ^ , 1109 N. Thirty-second Street, Billings, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. Victor West 610 West Avenue, Holdrege, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. Hedley R. Woodward .... 726 Standish Avenue, Westfield, N. J. 

New England Mrs. J. Franklin Knotts, 

_ , , ^ , 440 Newtonville Avenue, Newtonville, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. Edward N. Griffiths 15 Star Street Pawtucket R I 

New Hampshire Mrs. A. E. Baum 360 Wibird Street, Portsmouth, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Charles T. Clarke, 

-,-,.. ,, ^ 705 Mt. Vernon Avenue, Haddonfield, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. Francis L. Geyer. . .4001 N. Fourth Street, Albuquerque, N. M. 

New York Mrs. Frederick B. Newell, 

..,,,„ >, , „, „ 164 Westchester Avenue, Crestwood, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. J. W. Potter lis Woodside Avenue, Waterbury, Conn. 

t^°"hCarohna Mrs. G. Haven Caldwell. .911 E. 12^ Street, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. R. A. Lowe La Moure, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. A. G. Hoovens Parkside Goshen Ind 

North-East Ohio Mrs. John Seward 902 N. Sixth Street, Cambridge.'Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. A. C. Kaufman 2.309 Garfield Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Nor hern New York Mrs. F. H. Clark Route No. 1, Potsdam, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. R. A. Sturm Otterbein Ind. 



Conference Officers. 17 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. G. W. Eggleston Galva. Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. B. F. Schwartz 939 Highland Avenue, Salina. Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. H. J. Holcombe 222 W. Fourth Street, Greenville, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. A. R. Smith 413 N. Sixth Street, Tonkawa, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. Gilbert H. Newland . . . 7537 Richmond Avenue, Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. J. R. Wilkinson 157 S. Forest Street, Bellingham, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. J. S. Jacoby 1725 N. Twenty-sixth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. George H. Alexander, 

6921 Perrysville Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. C. W. Harper 11940 Wentworth Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. F. S. Bee Sebring, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Amanda Smith 215 Johnson Street, Statesboro, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Mamie E. Fields 5 Short Court, Charleston, S. C. 

South Florida Mrs. C. R. A. Banks 330 Spruce Street, Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Southern Miss Nelle Johnson 1505 West Gandy Street, Denison, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. Esther M. Edler 5503 Romaine Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. Ethel T. Holland Post Bldg., Marion, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. Winnie Nunn Box 304, Hunter, Ark. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. George H. Ott 402 E. Fifth Street, Kinsley, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. H. H. Jones 906 Main Street, Nashville, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. J. O. Williams 700 Moore Street, Marshall, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. Joseph Miller 6 Borthwick Avenue, Delmar, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. A. A. Cohagan 1003 Vine Street. Waterloo, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. John Haley 820 Thirteenth Street, N., Columbus, Miss. 

Utah Mission Miss Anna Corneliussen 475 Twenty-fifth Street, Ogden, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. William H. Jeffrey Groton, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Jeannette P. Jenkins 907 Jackson Street, Lynchburg, Va. 

West Texas Mrs. D. N. Swann 505 S. Cameron Street, Victoria, Tex. 

West Virginia Miss Alta Newcomb Park Hill, Huntington, W. Va. 

West Wisonsin Mrs. Ernest E. Clarke 806 .S. Barstow Street, Eau Claire, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. Fletcher J. Wharton, 

412 Philadelphia Pike, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. O. C. Hamilton ISO S. Charles Street, Waukesha, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. W. Gray Jones 919 Sunset Street, Scranton, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. J. W. Walker, 

334 W. Twenty-second Avenue. Torrington, Wyo. 



RECORDING SECRETARIES 

Alabama Mrs. R. S. Pendle 921 S. Sixteenth Street, Birmingham, Ala. 

Atlanta Miss Alyce Thornton 259 Crumley Street, S. W., .A.tlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. T. F. Law 1729 Varnum Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Miss M.^ude Spencer Misenheimer, N. C. 

California Mrs. Florence Schrader 6428 Colby Street, Oakland, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. Texas Cook Svlacauga, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. F. A. Van Hee Sodus Point. N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. J. W. Finton 228 Maclay Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Blanch E. Lee . . .1024 W. Seventeenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

Colorado Mrs. William Speer 1901 Cherry Street, Denver, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. R. E. Rich Rapid City, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. J. E. Dickerson 1718 Arctic Avenue, .-Vtlantic City, N. J. 

Detroit Mrs. F. A. Roemer 5209 S. Clarendon Avenue, Detroit. Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Lula T. Shockley Clinton, Tenn. 

Erie Mrs. C. C. Kennedy 311 College Avenue, Grove City, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. Bessie M. Brown 441 W. Columbia Street, Gainesville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. Leon Kemo Livonia, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. J. O. Hipp EUijay, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. C. E. Rogers Maple Street, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. Donald S. Campbell. . .122 S. Garfield Avenue, Pocatello, Idaho 

Illinois Miss Myra Banes Hillsboro, III. 

Indiana Mrs. J. A. Miller 906 Church Street, Vincennes, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. Lloyd Tennant Wapello, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. John W. Keller 1518 Mulvane Street, Topeka, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. Wm. A. Schaefer 928 Washington Avenue, Newport, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. W. P. Kellogg 123 E. Fifth Street, Maysville, Ky. 

Louisiana Mrs. W. H. Clark 1719 Weinstock Street, Shreveport, La. 

Maine Mrs. Lillian McCarthy 822 Washington .Avenue, Portland, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. W. H. Helrigel. . . .850 Washington Street, Traverse City, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. E. H. Sitzer 3 Como Station, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. S. K. Trigg 420 E. Seventh Street, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. Roy L. Bowers Jasper, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. H. E. Chappell 406 Third .\ venue. Laurel, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. W. D. Yoke 1105 S. Thirty-sixth Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. Herbert C. Lytle 755 Clifton .Avenue. Newark, N. J. 

New England Mrs. Merrill E. Cramer .... 107 Common Street, Watertown, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. John W. Kirk 101 Spring Street, Pawtucket, R. I. 

New Hampshire Mrs. Philip S. Nason 245 Highland Street, Portsmouth, N. H. 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



CONFERENCE 



New Jersey Mrs. Jos. R. Leaming 167 Evergreen Avenue, Woodlynne, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. A. V. Stafford Raton, N. M. 

New York Mrs. William Fisk 700 VV. 178th Street, New York, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. E. H. Henderson. . . . 164 Harrison Avenue, Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

North CaroHna Mrs. K. C. Hairston 7.S7 S. Twelfth Street, Hickory, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. J. W. Frisbie Washburn, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. V. S. Hoffman. . .406 W. Second Street, North Manchester, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Mrs. Earle Williams 536 E. Kline Street, Girard, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. W. L. Sample 3728 First Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. Robert Holmes Beaver Falls, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. P. M. Sickler 226 S. Ninth Street, Lafayette, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. J. R. Baggs Garner, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. A. N. Smith 1308 S. Ninth Street, Salina, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. H. C. Vaughn 12 West Tenth Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. W. W. Martin Elgin, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. A. F. Flegel '. . .935 N. E. Jarrett Street. Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. V. H. Orr 311 S. Jefferson Street, Moscow, Idaho 

Philadelphia Mrs. John Shutz, Jr 6482 Sherwood Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. John M. Crumrine 1013 Jancey Street, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Rock River Mrs. James O'May 3246 George .Street, Chicago, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. Geo. E. Sebring Sebring, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Rachel ColliSis Rocky Ford, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. L. A. C.\in Darlington, S. C. 

South Florida Mrs. Eliza Robinson Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Southern Mrs. H. Weiss 762 North River Street, Seguin, Te.x. 

Southern California Mrs. Ida B. Kibler.. . . 15239 Earlham Street, Pacific Palisades, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. J. M. Daniel 610 W. Main Street, Carbondale, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. Eunice S. Fields 612 E. Kansas Street, .\nadarko, Okla. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. L. L. Kabler 600 N. Main Street, Kingman, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. Maria Dobson. .924 Twenty-eighth Avenue, N., Nashville, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. F. W. Logan 281 1 Dallas Avenue, Houston, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. P. H. Wertz 43 Ray Street, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. J. L. Holland Independence, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. E. M. He.a.rnes Holly Springs, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. Gavin Goudie, 

224 S. Thirteenth Street, E., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. George Fox Oilman, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Esther V. Stephens. . 1007 V\'. Johnson Street, Staunton, Va. 

West Texas Mrs. L. E. Williams Schulenburg, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. C. J. Proudfoot 28 N. Front Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. .A. R. Henry River Falls, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. Charles W. Staats . . 2306 Baynard Boulevard, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. E. E. Horth 1 124 S. Twentv-fourth Street, Milwaukee, V/is. 

Wyoming Mrs. W. S. Garman 605 Fourth Street, West Pittston, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. R. H. Benedict Powell, Wyo. 



TREASURERS 

Alabama Mrs. M. M. Murphree 2146 E. Lake Boulevard, Tarrant, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. Mattie O. Brown 899 Lena Street, N. W., .Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. Lowell S. Ensor U Walker -Avenue, Pikesville, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. R. C. Nimon Ansonville. N. C. 

California Mrs. O. G. Frevermuth . . 154 Fifteenth Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 

Central .•\labama Mrs. L. A. M. Jackson 1631 Pine .Avenue, .Anniston, .^la. 

Central New York Miss Sybil M. Mather 964 Wadsworth Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. J. W. Lowther . . . .117 E. Fairmount .Avenue, State College, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. M. A. Gamby 615 N. Leffingwell Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. H. B. Duncan R. R. 3, Box 56, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. C. C. Totman 818 Eighth Street, Brookings, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. A. B. Horsey 720 W. Ninth Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Detroit Mrs. Ida M. Jackson Milford. Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Mamie B. Pearis 114 Jones Street, Bluefield, W. Va. 

Erie Mrs. R. A. Wade 1188 East Lake Road, Erie, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. .A.nnie G.\ss 613 N. Pleasant Street, Gainesville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. J. G. Meidenbauer 291 Maple Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. L. V. Donehoo Route 8, Box 265, Atlanta, Ga. 

Ho's'on Mrs. May P. Evans 115 Rockwood Avenue, Rockwood, Tenn. 

Ja?"9 Mrs. B. W. Clark 1 102 N. Ninth Street. Boise, Idaho 

j"'no's Mrs. J. W. .A.ndrews 425 Park Avenue, Springfield, 111. 

Indiana. . Mrs. W. W. Sims 1440 Pearl Street, Columbus, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. M. G. Addicks Box 342, Newton, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. G. W. Stafford 416 W. Myrtle Street, Independence, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. Ernest Parsons 204 Maple Street, Somerset, Kv. 

Lexington Mrs. F. R. .A.rnold 545 W. Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Louisiana Mrs. Irma G. Jackson 1119 Pierre Avenue, Shreveport, La. 

Maine Mrs F. M. Keith 31 Josslyn Street, Auburn, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. F. E. Jones 54 Zeno Street, S. W., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. D. L. Ekbes 1479 W. Minnehaha Street, St. Paul, Minn. 



Conference Officers. 19 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Mississippi Mrs. L. G. Coleman Box 705, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. Frank E. Bush 4117 Highland Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. J. E. Fritz 615 Second Avenue, N., Great Falls, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. H. F. Gilmour 2533 Washington Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. C. B. Griffiths 219 Fairmount Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

New England Miss Emily Day 47 HoUis Street, Newton, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. James V. Claypool 493 Public Street, Providence, R. I. 

New Hampshire Mrs. Harold Andrews 2 Grand View Avenue, Concord, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. William Sickler Clayton, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. J. D. Foster 2912 Federal Street, El Paso, Tex. 

New York Mrs. Joseph C. Schrader. . .666 West End Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. J. G. Wright 498 Ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

North Carolina Mrs. G. M. Phelps Box 575, Statesville, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. C. Anderson 610 Thirteenth Street, S., Fargo, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. A. B. Price 810 S. A Street, Richmond, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Mrs. T. C. Edmonds. . . .3141 Corydon Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. F. F. Safford 3228 Harriet Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. Ellis Aldridge 602 N. Madison Avenue, Rome, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. E. L. Wheeler 1917 Vinton Street, Lafayette, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. V. V. Whitney 2324 S. St. Aubin, Sioux City, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. W. S. Heusner 126 S. College Street, Salina, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. R. J. Plate 1531 Lakewood .Avenue, Lima, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. F. J. Hulme 316 S. Walnut Street, Guthrie, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. J. J. Oeder 201 N. E. Eleventh Street, Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. C. C. Berkey 722 Sumner Avenue, Spokane, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. Carl Herschel 3615 Highland Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. Julia G. Lydick 936 Mellon Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. H. E. S.\ndstrom 704 Reba Place, Evanston, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. E. L. Hinckley 4106 Notter Avenue, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. N. B. Prothro 1907 Burroughs Street, Savannah, Ga. 

South Carolina Miss E. L. Small 217 Coming Street, Charleston, S. C. 

South Florida Mrs. S. E. Thompson 603 N. W. Second Street, Miami, Fla. 

Southern Mrs. H. W. Meyer 2524 Napoleon Avenue, New Orleans, La. 

Southern California Mrs. J. W. Sisson. . . . 709 W. Ninety-fifth Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. George Bower Albion, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. B. F. Scott 331 W. Cedar Street, Wewoka, Okla, 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. Vincent Hiebsch 238 Quentin Avenue, Wichita, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. M. C. Chavis 910 First Avenue, S., Nashville, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. W. H. Logan Wiley College, Marshall, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. C. B. Wilco.x R. D. No. 4, Troy, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. Florence B.arrett 1031 Conger Street, Waterloo, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Miss Ida Gooden E. L. Rust Hall, Holly Springs, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. E. A. Hall 532 Center Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. Inez H. Perkins Northfield, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Henrietta J. Douglass. . .2025 Division Street, Baltimore, Md. 

West Texas Mrs. M. M. Sanford 1225 S. Third Street, Waco, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. Frank P. Hall 517 Gaston Avenue, Fairmont, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. Ernest B.^rber 1 125 Vilas .Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. Wm. F. Artis 2326 W. Sixteenth Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. E. Barber 1125 Vilas .Avenue, Madison, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. H. C. Perkins 4 Lincoln .Avenue, Binghamton, N. Y. 

Wyoming State Mrs. Mary Nauman Douglas, Wyo. 



WESLEYAN SERVICE GUILD 

Alabama 

Atlanta Mrs. Willie Mae Price Ill Chestnut Street, S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic 

California Miss Alice Koening 1202 Hampshire Street, San Francisco. Calif. 

Central Alabama 

Central New York 

Central Pennsylvania Miss Helen L. McFarland 2101 Bellevue Road, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Sally Parkham 4259 Enright .■X venue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. .Albert Tuck Lamar, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. F. E. Morrison Huron, S. D. 

Delaware 

Detroit Miss Mildred Baird 319 W. Ninth Street, Flint, Mich. 

East Tennessee 

Erie 

Florida 

Genesee Mrs. A. M. Dietterich Wellsville, N. Y. 

Georgia 

Holston Miss Ethel Pryor Ritter Hall, Athens, Tenn. 

Idaho Miss Elizabeth Anderson 

Illinois Miss Viola Gallup 204 Ellis Street, Peoria. 111. 

Indiana Miss Grace Vickery Newbergh. Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Miss Eleanor Burton 1614 E. Ninth Street. Des Moines, Iowa 



20 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Kansas Mrs. R. A. Hunt 1527 Massachusetts Street, Lawrence, Kan. 

Kentucky 

Lexington Mrs. I value B. Jones 617 Indiana .'\ venue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Michigan Mrs. L. L. Dewey 846 Calvin Street, S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. Frank Cone 1335 Como-Phalen .Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi 

Missouri Mrs. Glenn A. Baldwin 2631 E. Jule Street, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Montana State 

Nebraska Mrs. Ray S. Wycoff Lexington, Neb. 

Newark 

New England 

New England Southern 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York Mrs. Carl Von Storch 34 Fairview Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. W. K. Fletcher 8614 133d Street, Jamaica, N. Y. 

North Carolina 

North Dakota Miss Myrtle Ross Fargo, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. Ershel G. Pence 409 N. Purdum Street, Kokomo, Ind. 

North- East Ohio Mrs. Helen Hall 347 Portage Trail E., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Miss Iona A. Geggie. . . . 1826 La Salle Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York 

Northwest Indiana Miss Katherine Woodhams, 209 North Street, West Lafayette, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa 

Northwest Kansas 

Ohio Miss Dorothy Sinkey 2421 Andover Road, Columbus, Ohio 

Oklahoma Miss Mable Dague 1536 E. Park Place, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. John D. McCormick 530 C. Street, Springfield, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Miss Eva Hall, 

First M. E. Church. Fifth and Marion Streets, Seattle, Wash. 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Rock River Mrs. Miron A. Morrill 44 N. Williams Street, Crystal Lake, 111. 

St. Johns River 

Savannah 

South Carolina 

South Florida 

Southern 

Southern California Miss Ida Woehr 247 N. Jackson Street, Glendale, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Miss Gladys Carpenter 1126 North Street, Mt. Vernon, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. E. J. Pa.\ton Box 122, Boley, Okla. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. W. M. Austin Mulvane, Kan. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Troy 

Upper Iowa Miss Loraine Lawyer Schneider Building, Iowa City, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi 

Utah Mission Mrs. R. S. Miner 460 First Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. Elfie Snow Montpelier, Vt. 

Washington 

West Texas 

West Virginia 

West Wisconsin 

Wilmington 

Wisconsin Miss Helen Purdy 23 73 N. Fifty-eighth Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wyoming 

Wyoming State 



YOUNG PEOPLE 

Alabama Mrs. C. Boatman Boaz, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. D. B. Whitaker 1 1 1 Chestnut Street, S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. Charles .Anderson. .2001 E. Lafayette Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. W. S. Sharp Pfeiffer Junior College, Misenheimer, N. C. 

California Mrs. Earle Menker 1054 Longridge Road, Oakland, Calif. 

Central Alabama 

Central New York Mrs. S. G. Houghton 236 Forest .''i venue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. L. P. Greenawalt 2319 N. Second Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Eliza Ei.sford 2928 Lawton Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. E. B. Dearden 4623 E. Sixteenth Avenue, Denver, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. R. E. Moore Aberdeen, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. Melnese Gibson 315 E. Broad Street, Salisbury, Md. 

Detroit Mrs. Will Curtiss 3229 Stanley Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Fannie McKnigiit Box 66, Bluefield, W. Va. 



Conference Officers. 21 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Erie Mrs. P. W. Anderson Box 94, Polk, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. K. O. McLaurin 754 N. Grove Street, Gainesville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. C. E. Frost Buffalo Road, N., Chili, N. Y. 

Georgia Miss Ethel Harpst Cedartown, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. Joe Hampston 1905 Bailey Avenue, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Idaho M rs. Dalas McNeil Payette, Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana Mrs. E. W. Stockdale 2531 Central Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. O. C. Boshart Wayland, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. Paul Simmons White City, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. Walter R. Horst, 

30 Crittenden Road, South Hills, Covington, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. Letha Mae King 2940 Indiana Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Louisiana Mrs. M. T. Brown 510 Boulevard, Lake Charles, La. 

Maine Mrs. Louis S. Staples Highland Avenue, Gardiner, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. W. H. Fleenor 610 S. Main Street, Eaton Rapids, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. R. Jay Wilson 996 Hudson Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. K. M. Stevens 140 W. Cohea Street, Jackson, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. Clarence E. Speer 2822 Mitchell Street, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. W. M. Adams 1321 First Avenue, N., Great Falls, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. Frank Pennington Wymore, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. Arthur R. Humble 65 Sandford Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. 

New England Mrs. C. E. Avey 130 Bellevue Road, Lynn, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. George R. Austin 21 Pleasant Street, Dighton, Mass. 

New Hampshire Mrs. R. H. Mitchell 160 Locust Street, Dover, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Harry H. Pratt. . .5504 We.stfield Avenue, Merchantville, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. E. Cletsoway 3329 Monte Vista, Albuquerque, N. M. 

New York Mrs. Frank N. McClure 19 Cummings Street, New York, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. DeForest Becker, 

1176 E. Twenty-ninth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

North Carolina Miss W. Marie Carter 1502 West Street, High Point. N. C. 

North Dakota Miss Hope Stubblefield Cando, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. B. H. Franklin 209 E. Jefferson Street, Goshen, Ind. 

North- East Ohio Mrs. Carl Bechberger 2681 Ashley Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. H. S. Lynde 312 Xerxes Avenue, N., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. B. L. Waters Massena, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. W. I. Wilson 103 Campbell Street, Valparaiso, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. A. W. VanderWilt Milford, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. H. P. Woertendyke Colby, Kan. 

Ohio ,. . .Mrs. C. R. Willis 210 South Ohio Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. Nellie Gayman Oilton, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. John B. Ulrich 1475 Saginaw Street, Salem, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. E. P. Dean 1612 N. Fifty-fourth Street, Seattle, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. J. Henry Schmidt 59 Stratford Avenue, Aldan, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. Albert Dawson 415 E. Tenth Avenue, Tarentum, Pa. 

Rock River Miss Clara O. Meyer 4433 N. Ashland Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

St. Johns River Miss Amy Stout 15 South Pine Street, Sebring, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Aline Holmes 804 Howe Street, Brunswick, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Beulah Caldwell 97 Treadwell Street, Orangeburg, S. C. 

South Florida 

Southern Mrs. Lee Loeffler Mason, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. Clarence Crowell 1415 7 Sherman Way, Van Nuys, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. Lloyd Melton Harrisburg, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. Polly T. Kemp 824 E. Fourth Street, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. Ross Hili.ard Pratt, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. W. D. Frierson Brentwood, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. J. L. Blue 2130 Brooklyn Avenue, Beaumont, Tex. 

Troy Miss Hazel M. Best 200K East Avenue, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. M.\ude King Woodall Monticello, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. Emm.\ Elzy Corinth, Miss. 

Utah Mission Miss Ada Duhigg Route 1, Box 30 B, Bingham Canyon, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. C. L. Wheaton Fairfax, Vt. 

Washington Miss M. Roberta Boston 1 144 Argyle Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

West Texas Mrs. E. E. Mosley Hallettsville, Tex. 

West Virginia Miss Beryl Stewart Mannington, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. Fred Balliett Augusta, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. A. H. Schoei.l R. F. D. 2, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. Marshall Born 2325 Fiftieth Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. Earl V. Tolley 224 S. Blakely Street, Dunmore, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. Richard W. Lungren . . , 444 Fourth Street, Rock Springs, Wye . 



JUNIOR 

Alabama Mrs. E. F. Daily Oneonta, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. E. V. Scott 347 Ashby Street, N. W., .Xtlanta. Ga. 

Baltimore Miss Julia Beach 605 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Miss Ervilla Masters Misenheimer, N. C. 

CaHfornia Mrs. W. E. Armstrong 5875 Picardy Drive, Oakland, Calif. 



22 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Central Alabama Mrs. Etta Benham 1518 Cooper Avenue, Anniston, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. H. C. Sears 206 E. Fourth Street, Watkins Glen, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. A. R. Turner 611 W. Philadelphia Street, York, Pa. 

Central West Miss Arsania M. Williams, 

4.n8 San Francisco Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. W. A. Beard 225 Remington Street, Ft. Collins, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. Charles Graham, 

1412 W. Seventeenth Street. Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. Mary E. Stewart 402 E. Church Street, Salisbury, Md. 

Detroit Mrs. John G. Peshek 1570 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Susie Morris 1816 Lucky Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Eric Mrs. Wilfrid Hodge 52 Plum Street, Greenville, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. M. Todd McKinzie 551 N. Pleasant Street, Gainesville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. Clyde Riipert 43 N. Willow Street, East Aurora, N. Y. 

Georgia Miss Florence Vann .... McCarty Settlement House. Cedartown, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. C. O. Douglass 211 N. Jackson Street, Athens, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. M. H. King 140 S. Conant Street. Durley, Idaho 

Illinois Mrs. Edgar C. Love Orion, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. T. E. Adams Brookville. Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. E. A. Marshall 215 D Avenue. E., Albia. Iowa 

Kansas Miss Floy Liston Baldwin, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. W. S. Peters 103 E. Southern Avenue, Covington, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. J. W. Patton 957 Preston Street, Louisville. Ky. 

Louisiana Mrs. R. A. Warmsley Morgan City, La. 

Maine Miss Emma Martin 45 Chapel Street, South Portland, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. W. R. Prescott 1400 Jerome Street, Lansing, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. Vern J. Neal 319 Hickory Street, Mankato, Minn. 

Mississippi Miss Annie B. Sherman 608 S. Seventh Avenue, Laurel, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. Fielding A. Poe 7725 Augusta Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. H. W. Woods Libby. Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. R. A. Thompson . . . 1138 N. Thirty-seventh Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. B. W. F. Randolph 116 Walnut Avenue, Cranford, N. J. 

New England Mrs. H. E. Snow 219 High Street, Greenfield, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. David Carter 31 Middle Street, Fairhaven, Mass. 

New Hampshire Mrs. J. R. Parkhurst 564 Middle Street. Portsmouth. N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Herbert J. Smith 26 Peters Place. Red Bank. N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. Frank Lakin Box 192. Santa Fe. N. M. 

New York Mrs. Eugene Verdin Dobbs Ferry. N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. William Trimble 512 Tenth Street. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

North Carolina Mrs. C. E. Bell 1018 Watkins Street, Winston-Salem. N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. G. A. Hample 234 N. Thayer Street, Bismarck, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. Lester Weir R. D. No. 4. LaGrange. Ind. 

North- East Ohio Mrs. E. E. Blair, Jr. . . . 135 W. Madison Avenue. Youngstown. Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. D. P. Larsen 4244 Alden Drive, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. A. E. Budd Vernon, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana M rs. L. H . Little Linden, Ind . 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. W. S. Handy Gilmore City, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. E. E. Kite St. Francis. Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. Charles R. South 1215 Edison Avenue, Dayton, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. J. W. Norman 210 E. Springer Avenue, Guthrie, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. E. C. Miller 155 S. Nineteenth Street. Salem. Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. A. S. Cory 1070 Washington Avenue, Chehalis, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. W. C. Halteman 527 Hamilton Street, Norristown, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. Joy R. Irvine 825 Clarissa Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. J. P. Smallwood 6258 N. Normandy Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. Edna Herriott Fern Hall, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Mary Anderson 714 Daniel Street, Waycross. Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Maggie V. Glover 556 S. Main Street. Sumter, S. C. 

South Florida Mrs. N. S. Powers 828 N. W. First Court. Miami. Fla. 

Southern Mrs. Don L. Harwell Kinder. La. 

Southern California Mrs. George A. Skewis 546 Ocean View Lane, Whittier. Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. J. W. Smith 208 N. W. Fourth Street. Fairfield. III. 

Southwest Mrs. H. E. C. Montgomery. 

„ ^ 4304 W. Seventeenth Street. Little Rock. Ark. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. A. M. Pammenter 1425 S. Water Street, Wichita, Kan. 

Tennessee 

Texas Mrs. Belle Jones ....'.'.'.'. '. ', '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. ' '. '. '. '. '. ' '. '. ' '. '. ' '. Galveston,' Tex. 

,V°y- • ■ Miss Marian Hemstreet 392 Morris Street. Albany. N. Y. 

Upper Iowa. Mrs. L. N. Johnson 408 N. Seventh Avenue. Marshalltown. Iowa 

Upper Mississippi 

Utah Mission Miss Hazel Cooper .'.' .' .' ." .' .' .' .' .' .475 Twenty-fifth Street. Ogden. Utah 

,\f "P?"' Mrs. Harry Colby Bradford. Vt. 

,V,^shington Miss Mary R. Martin .. .2352 Sixth Street. N. W.. Washington. D. C. 

West Texas Mrs. S. E. Jones 102 L'Overture. Cuero. Tex. 

,V,^s' Xir^'"'^. ^'*s- D. I. Whiting 207 Duncan Avenue, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. F. V. Powell 1908 Adams Street. Madison, Wis. 

vviimington Mrs. Thomas Brown . . . 2629 W. Eighteenth Street. Wilmington. Del. 

V\ isconsin Mrs. Frederick Bauer. 

,,r . , 7131 Milwaukee Avenue. Wauwatosa. Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. S.Oliver Bell 55 W. Main Street, Nanticoke, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. Mildred Rickeli 1 143 Cody Avenue, Cody, Wyo. 



Conference Officers. 23 



CHRISTIAN CITIZENSHIP 



CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Alabama Mrs. Ellis Moody Boaz, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. L. J. Royal Ill Chestnut Street, S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. J. C. Millian 3604 Cedardale Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge- Atlantic Mrs. W. A. Parsons Statesville, N. C. 

California Mrs. Shirley M. Coggins 728 Cole Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Central .-Mabama Mrs. M. M. Trammel 3201 Pine Avenue, .\nniston, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. Ella McCarthy 34 S. Hunter Avenue, Auburn, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. L. A. Welliver 2431 N. Second Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Amanda McQuire 710 N. Whittier Street, St. Louis, Mo . 

Colorado Mrs. Fred Thebus 1330 Gaylord Street, Denver, Colo. 

Dakota 

Delaware Mrs. A. B. Clark 453 N. Dearborn Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Detroit Mrs. J. E. MacDonough 1226 Virginia Park, Detroit, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Minnie Jennings 139 Exter .\ venue, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Erie Mrs. H. D. Webster 392 Main Street, Greenville, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. E. R. Reed Box 32, Reddick, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. John Sadler 18 Verdun Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Georgia 

Holston Mrs. Guy Shoun Greeneville, Tenn . 

Idaho Mrs. Edgar Oakes P. O. Box 347, Caldwell, Idaho 

Illinois Miss Emma Eberhardt Arthur, III. 

Indiana Mrs. W. W. Reedy Zionsville Road, New Augusta, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. William Leacox 404 Church Street, Shenandoah, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. Harry Smethurst 1212 Thurston Street, Manhattan, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. F. W. Moats 4100 S. Third Street, Louisville, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. Mayme Brooks 6729 St. Lawrence Avenue, Chicago, III. 

Louisiana Mrs. Octavia Stewart 2629 Second Street, Alexandria, La. 

Maine Mrs. C. O. Perry Old Orchard Beach, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. C. R. Sylvester 223 Fremont Street, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Minnesot^a Mrs. J. E. Rains Owatonna, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. M. E. Wilburn R. R. No. 2, Box 133, Benton, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. Charles Meyers Braymer, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. A. H. Maher P. O. Box No. 38, Whitefish, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. B. J. Burress 2424 Hartman .'\ venue, Omaha, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. A. E. Osborne 34 Netherwood Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. 

New England Mrs. G. D. Burns 28 Lincoln Street, Winthrop, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. Thomas P. Nichols 30 Grove Street, Westerly, R. I. 

New Hampshire Mrs. Anna L. Buckley 3 Maple Street, Woodsville, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Lillian Harvey 1 109 Empire Avenue, Camden, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. Roy Tucker 508 Broadway, Silver City, N. M. 

New York Mrs. Warren W. Churchill 720 N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. Glenn C. Pettit. .20 Lincoln Avenue, Rockville Center, N. Y. 

North Carolina Mrs. R. B. Withers 519 Bennett Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. Cora Cunningham, 

Care of School for Deaf, Devils Lake, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. A. C. Hoover Bunker Hill, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Mrs. A. L. Murray., 403 Burgess Street, Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. P. A. Barkuloo, 

3136 Thirty-fifth Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. P. DeFlorio Central Square, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Miss Julia H. Beal 1928 Lincoln Avenue, Whiting, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. J. A. Kettle Rock Valley, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. Minnie Summers Downs, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. Bess S. Kuntz E. Defiance Street, Leipsic, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. G. W. Kesselring 1624 W. Newton Street. Tulsa, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. D. G. Wilson 3137 N. E. Sixtieth Avenue, Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. O. H. McGill. . .4236 Eighteenth Street, N. E., Seattle, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. Geo. R. Lovell, 

222 E. Johnson Street, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. W. M. DeVinney 605 Hay Street, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. Herman Fabry 2405 Lincoln Street, Evanston, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. M. A. Bouvier 225 W. Tenth Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Violet Johnson 932 Hicks Street, Waycrof t, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Stella Aiken S. Main Street, Sumter, S. C. 

South Florida 

Southern Mrs. B. W. Baldwin 2721 Woodlawn Blvd., Denison, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. Thomas Clanin 328 G. Street, Bakersfield, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. J. J. Copeland R. F. D., Greenville, III. 

Southwest Mrs. M. O. Hunter 314 Poplar Street, Pine Bluff, .-Xrk. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. A. A. Etchison P. O. Box 853, Oxford, Kan. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Troy Mrs. R. T. Viets 1868 Becker Street, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. Lloyd Sisler Epworth, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi 

Utah Mission Mrs. Walter French 2604 Jefferson Avenue, Ogden, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. Arthur W. Hewitt Riverton, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Genevieve T. Stalev. .227 R Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



24 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

West Texas Mrs. Lola Reed 25\il4 Guillot Street, Dallas, Tex. 

West X'irginia Mrs. Robert G. Stewart 107 Virginia Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. Ralph Edgar ISIS S. Farwell Street, Eau Claire, Wis. 

Wilmington Miss Elsie Matthews Ridgeley, Md. 

Wisconsin Miss Laura Barnes 15S Wilbur Avenue. Waukesha, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. Thomas Edwards P. O. Box 181, Dalton, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. F. A. Mills Powell, Wyo. 



LENTEN OFFERING 

Alabama Mrs. Roy Rogers 1700 Mt. Drive, Tarrant, Ala. 

Atlanta Miss Celia Thornton 259 Crumley Street, S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. A. H. McKinley 308 A. Street, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. A. Fuecher Ocracoke, N. C. 

California Mrs. W. G. Davis 612 Thirty-first Street, Oakland, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. L V. Horton Cedar Bluff, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. J. W. Burton Mecklenburg, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. T. M. B. Hicks 332 Hepburn Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Central West Miss Edna Jackson 4526 Cottage Avenue, .St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. Charles Smiley Brush, Colo. 

Dakota 

Delaware Miss Frances Banks 211 Second Street, Salisbury, Md. 

Detroit Mrs. W. H. Perkens 4S9 W. Ferry Street, Detroit, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Rozella Watson North Mercie Street, Bluefield, W. Va. 

Erie Mrs. J. A. Lyons 9 N. High Street, DuBois, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. Katie Avery 2730 Lenot Avenue, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. Jesse Wilcox 94 Ontario Street, Corning, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. R. J. Burke 411 Thompson Street, East Point, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. J. M. Irwin Lenoir City, Tenn. 

Idaho .' 

Illinois Mrs. Jessie A. Cooke 1502 Hazel Street, Danville, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. D. H. Richards 904 Busseron Avenue, Vincennes, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Miss Bertha Dixon 512 S. Garfield Avenue, Burlington, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. Clyde Odom 1023 Washington Street, Emporia, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. H. C. Beach. . 1009 Winding Way, Kenton Hills, Covington, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. Louise Cooper 443 E. Forty-fifth Place, Chicago, 111. 

Louisiana 

Maine Mrs. F. H. Hall 24 Pleasant Street, Milo, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. A. I. Gilbert 227 Marshall Street, Lansing, Mich. 

Minnesota Miss Laura Slifer 837 Armstrong Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. N. K. Jones 908 S. Seventh Avenue, Laurel, Miss. 

Missouri Miss Elsie Swan 504 E. Tenth Street, Sedalia, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. W. C. Packer 520 N. Davis .Street, Helena, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. A. J. Singleterrv 718 Logan Street, Holdrege, Neb. 

Newark Miss Victoria A. Ralph 2350 Boulevard, Jersey City, N. J. 

New England Mrs. Alex Logan 200 Beethoven Avenue, Waban, Mass. 

New England Southern Miss Mildred A. Woolley Box 82, G. P. O., Fall River, Mass. 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico Mrs. J. T. Bainbridge Cimarron, N. M. 

New York Miss Mildred Hull 20 Linden Place, Ossining, N. Y . 

New York East Mrs. John Arrowsmith. .101 Kensington Avenue, New Britain, Conn. 

North Carolina Mrs. J. E. Brower 220 Woodfin Street, Asheville, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. O. A. Spillum Rugby, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. Thomas Davies Albion, Ind. 

North- East Ohio Mrs. J. Y. Montague 137 McDowell Avenue, Steubenville, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. I. M. Cook 3145 Irving Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. Nellie Richardson Fulton, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. F. T. Wilcox 1116 Indiana Avenue, Laporte, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. W. H. Lease Rolfe. Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. A. W. Cochran Rice, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. C. Lester Spaid 1325 Kurd Avenue, Findlay, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. Wayne Essley El Reno, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. John M. Canse. . .3324 N. E. Eighteenth Avenue, Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. J. Edgar Purdy 1403 W. Chestnut Street, Yakima, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. John Keiser 1032 Morgan Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Pittsburgh 

Rock River Mrs. W. E. Tower.'.'. '. . '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. 432 Normal Parkway.' Chicago! 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. W. S. Aldridge 214 South N Street, Lake Worth, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. E. B. Stripling Mosely Street, Waycross, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Maggie Smith Stokes Sumter, S. C. 

South Florida 

Southern Miss Frieda Sturm Route 2, Gonzales, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. C. H. Anson 1 18 E. Foothill Blvd.. Monrovia, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. A. R. Ransom Fairfield, III. 

Southwest Mrs. Maggie Hutson 807 N. Q Street, Ft. Smith, Ark. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. Mark Penland Langdon, Kan. 



Conference Officers. 25 



CONFERENCE 



Tennessee Mrs. G. W. Lewis 16 Miller Street, Nashville, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. A. W. Harley 908 Whetstone Street, Marshall, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. J. M. Harris 6() McElwain Street, Cohoes, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. R. S. Toogood, 

1528 Washington Street, S. E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Miss Rebecca Walker Fourteenth .Street, N., Columbus, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. L. A. Quivev. ... 415 S. Twelfth Street, E., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. John Davis Northfield, Vt . 

Washington Mrs. Lucinda E. Miner 1433 R Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

West Texas Mrs. C. A. Hamilton 1208 E. Twelfth Street, Austin, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. Frank Furbee 215 Locust Avenue, Mannington, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. B. L. Greenfield Viroqua, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. J. Harry Wright 201 Woodlawn Avenue, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin , 

Wyoming Mrs. Roy Henwood Sherburne, N. Y. 

Wyoming State Mrs. C. A. Nowlen Cody, Wyo. 



MISSIONARY EDUCATION 

.Alabama Mrs. Chas. C. Steward . . 2201 Fifteenth Avenue, N., Birmingham, Ala. 

.■\tlanta Miss Ellen Shirley Calhoun Street, Newnan, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. O. B. Langrall 2426 Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic 

California Mrs. E. J. McCarthy 50 Laguna Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. A. J. Jones 1120 Seventh Street, Birmingham, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. H. B. Dudley 113 Ferris Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. R. S. Tompkins 312 Louisa Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. L. R. Grant 56 Wesley Street, S., Kinloch Park. Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. E. E. Watkins. . 1128 N. Institute Street, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Dakota 

Delaware Mrs. Carrie Johnson Cheswold, Del 

Detroit Mrs. Leroy I. Lord 4873 Underwood Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Lettie Gan.\way Box 64, Cooper, W. Va. 

Erie Mrs. M. E. Shaffer 140 E. Long Avenue, DuBois, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. Ella Matthews Starke, Fla. 

Genesee 

Georgia Mrs. Rudolph Baker. . . . 1062 Hemphill Avenue, N. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. H. E. Little Clinton, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. E. R. Kaemmer Burley, Idaho 

Illinois Mrs. F. W. Disbrow 409 Beecher Street, Bloomington, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. G. A. Smith 2609 E. New York Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. B. R. Dawson 3820 Sixth Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 

Kansas Miss Grace Givin 931 Fremont Street, Manhattan, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. C. A. Wilson 1282 Everett Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. S. W. Bankhead 98 Kendall Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Louisiana Mrs. Le Roy Fields 217 N. Prieur Avenue, New Orleans, La. 

Maine. . . . , Mrs. Walter Willey 42 Roosevelt Avenue, Waterville, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. L. R. White 703 S. Barnes Street, Mason, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. C. A. Leaman 1382 Hewitt .'Kvenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Miss Nancy Houston 337 Jefferson Street, Laurel, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. Alfred Braithwaite Bolivar, Mo. 

Montana State 

Nebraska Mrs. Ida Bishop 1526 S. Twenty-eighth Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. L. L. MacAdams 7 Bird's Eye Glen, Verona, N. J. 

New England Mrs. Jonathan Cartmill. .260 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. Chas. H. Van N.\tter. .24 Hyland .Street, East Greenwich, R. I. 

New Hampshire Miss Louise Colby 122 Pleasant Street, Claremont, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. E. Y. Dobbins 241 Mountwell Avenue, Haddonfield, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. C. M. Thompson Las Vegas, N. M. 

New York Mrs. E. G. Wahl Goshen, N. Y. 

New York East Miss Jean Latham 184 Bon .-^ir Avenue, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

North Carolina Mrs. C. A. Peeler 803 Julian Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. F. W. Heidel 605 Normal .Avenue, Valley City, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. R. H. Lilly 1819 Prairie Street, Elkhart, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Mrs. L. B. Leighninger 1006 Walnut Street, Coshocton, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. J. J. Kikta 3239 First .Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York : . Mrs. Fred Lewis Mannsville, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. Katherine Landis Flora, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. Fremont Faul Farnhamville, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. Jessie Dennis Woodston, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. E. A. Kolb 373 Deshler .'Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. C. B. Hill Box 811, Guthrie, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. J. W. Working 432 W. Sixth Street. Eugene, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. E. C. Bowersox Wenatchee, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. P. G. Masters Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Miss Carrie N. Dixon 2000 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. C. T. Johnson 8115 Grandon Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. Max Rodes Melbourne, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Dora Bryant. . 1017 ,\. W. Thirty-seventh Street, Savannah, Ga. 



26 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

South Carolina Mrs. Bessie L. Dibble 716 Lafayette Street, Camden, S. C. 

South Florida :.■■ v,' '.■''■' 'A ^' ■ ' . ■ • v ' ' 

Southern Mrs. John Deschner 710 N. Austin Street, Seguin, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. Fred Eberhart 231 S. Citrus Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. Mattie Knight 706 S. Broadway, Salem, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. D. G. Franklin Guthrie, Okla. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. R. L. Wells 425 S. Erie Street, Wichita, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. T. B. Hardiman 901 Seventh Avenue, S., Nashville, Tenn. 

Texas . Mrs. M. A. Washinton 1106 Nolen Street, Narasota, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. F. F. Adams Warrensburg, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. R. A. Holdiman 607 State Street, Marshalltown, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Miss Annie L. Daniels Kilmichael, Miss. 

Utah Mission Miss Frances Knerr 475 Twenty-fifth Street, Ogden, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. N. Harlan Scott Groton, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Mary E. Griffin. . 1223 New Jersey Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

West Texas Mrs. L. E. Moore 1915 E. Twelfth Street, Austin, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. J. E. Henry 162 Elliot Street, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. H. R. Ralph Montfort, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. F. L. Dupree 2908 West Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Miss Bertha Fowler 3134 S. Logan Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. Ruth Clinton Plains, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. F. A. Mills Powell, Wyo. 



MITE BOXES 



Alabama Mrs. J. A. Bynum Oneonta, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. Carrie Gaither 614 Ashby Street, N. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. M. A. Andrew 2824 Maryland Avenue. Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. S. M. Gibson Marion, N. C. 

California Mrs. Ira Sanford 1033 Peralta Street, Berkeley, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. Bessie Williams. ... 1011 Cleveland Avenue, Montgomery, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. M. E. Bowman 403 Steuben Street, Horseheads, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. J. Resler Shultz 1211 Logan Avenue, Tyrone, Pa. 

Central West Miss Novella Jobe 3648 Finney Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. H. E. Green 1129 Sixth Street, Greeley, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. C. C. Truax Huron, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. Mary E. Miles Ridgely, Md. 

Detroit Mrs. John A. Coy 3953 Wabash Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Jessie P. Stephens. . .2104 Walker Avenue, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Erie Mrs. W. S. Weaver "Broadacres," Brookville, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. R. R. Robinson 2117 Venus Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. James E. Clark 237 Bedford Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. E. J. Hammond 706 Capitol Avenue, S. E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. G. T. Byrd Dayton, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. G. S. Samsel 246 N. Ridge Avenue, Idaho Falls, Idaho 

Illinois Mrs. W. H. Simmons 2316 Western Avenue, Mattoon, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. George Morris 419 Manchester Street, Aurora, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. J. G. Scroggs Clarinda, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. Foster Galloway R. R. 9, Topeka, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. H. C. Beach . . 1009 Winding Way, Kenton Hills, Covington, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. Kathleen Bright 306 La Belle Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Louisiana Mrs. A. B. Harris New Orleans, La. 

Maine Mrs. Elsie Hoyt Cushings Point, South Portland, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. C. O. VanderVort, 

28 Mayfield Avenue, N. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. W. A. Moore Rochester, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. Eddie McDonald 523 E. Seventh Street, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. C. B. Hamilton Trenton, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. Minnie McChesney Lewistown, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. Russell Richmond. .424 S. Forty-eighth Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. Edward Jenkins 57 E. McFarlan Street, Dover, N. J. 

New England Mrs. W. E. Munroe 71 Melrose Street, Arhngton, Mass. 

New England Southern Miss Florence B. Washburn Stafford Springs, Conn. 

New Hampshire Miss W. K. Dresser 23 Buttonwoods Avenue, Haverhill, Mass. 

New Jersey Mrs. Ira S. Pimm 2 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. H. M. Hilliard Mountainair, N. M. 

New York Mrs. Harry G. White 276 Church Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. F. H. Johnson 715 Capitol Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 

North Carolina Mrs. J. C. Waddy 1000 S. Ashe Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. C. W. Baumann New Rockford, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. G. W. Keisling 1901 Meridian Street, Anderson, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Miss Ada McCullough 319 E. Second Street, Uhrichsville, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. C. E. Blume 3126 Weenonah Place, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. H. A. Hoyt 221 William Street, Watertown. N. Y. 



Conference Officers. 27 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. Florence Canine 404 E. Main Street, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. Roy Hughes Sutherland, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. E. A. McFadden 1410 S. Santa Fe Avenue, Salina, Kan. 

Ohio Miss Fannie Black St. Paris, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. R. E. Bradshaw, 

1201 W. Forty-sixth Street, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. G. C. Osburn 2418 N. E. Eighth Avenue, Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. L. P. Lowry 1509 Interlaken Place, Seattle, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. E. S. Gault 11 Kirklyn Avenue, Kirklyn, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. Charles C. Heckman, 

3351 Delaware Avenue, Pittsburgh, N. S., Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. Harvey J. Price 4433 Greenwood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. J. I. Conklin 221 N. VV. Twenty-fifth Avenue, Miami, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Mattie Whitfield R. F. D., Waynesboro, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Wilhelmina Gupple Lynchburg, S. C. 

South Florida 

Southern Mrs. J. J. Brodhead 3548 University Blvd., Dallas, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. C. H. Anson 118 E. Foothill Blvd., Monrovia, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. F. P. Bracy 321 S. Fourteenth Street, Herrin, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. C. B. Holland Cotton Plant, Ark. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. Walton Sample 1201 Main Street, Hutchinson, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. Bessie Brooks 1054 Second Avenue, S., Nashville, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. L. E. Williams 2130 Brooklyn Street, Beaumont, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. I. H. Williams 3 Mill Street, Gloversville, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. Charles McGoon Hampton, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. Fannie Cauthon Greenwood, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. William Kerr 2730 Van Buren Avenue, Ogden, Utah 

Vermont Miss Edna Lockwood Springfield, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Ella W. Parker. . .1709 First Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

West Texas Mrs. Blanche Goff 1210 Paul Quinn Avenue, Waco, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. C. W. Flesher Box 1683, Charleston, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. O. E. Gray 122 Bayley Avenue, Platteville, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. Harman Henderer. . .203 Woodlawn Avenue, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. C. O. Dunning Route 8, Box 813K, Wauwatosa, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. Fred W. Church 148 Warren Street, Tunkhannock, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. Vernon Winkle Lyman, Neb. 



PERMANENT MISSIONARY FUND 

Alabama Mrs. Sherman Smith Boaz, Ala. 

Atlanta 

Baltimore Mrs. Fred C. Hall 518 E. Twenty-first Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. J. E. Manney Kings Mountain, N. C. 

California Mrs. J. E. Pi.\tt 2033 Hearst .A. venue, Berkeley, Calit. 

Central Alabama Mrs. Irma Park 15 Tuttle Avenue, Montgomery, .Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. William H. Powers 931 Comstock .Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. E. R. Heckman 951 Washington Avenue, Tyronne. Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Myrtle Jackson Box 71, South Kinloch Park, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. J. J. Lace 684 S. Williams Street, Denver, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. G. W. Zellhoefer 1505 S. First Avenue, Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. Mary E. J. Nichols 812 Tatnall Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Detroit Mrs. W. H. Perkins 459 W. Ferry Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Sydnia Logan 1402 Blackford Street, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Erie Mrs. Carl S. Hart 142 Garfield Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. Geneva M. Williams. . . 1464 W. Sixth Street, Jacksonville. Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. J. G. Meidenbauer 291 Maple Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. Lucille a. White. . . 135 Montgomery Drive, N. E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. J. W. Chasteen Danridge, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. W. Halsey Union, Ore. 

Ilhnois Mrs. J. H. Winters 207 W. Williams Street, Decatur, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. John Jordan 916 N. Main Street, Rushville, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. Horace Hollingsworth. . . 702 Maple Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. A. H. Latzke 1527 Humboldt .Avenue, Manhattan, Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. H. C. Beach. . 1009 Winding Way, Kenton Hills, Covington, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. Annie Y. Clemmons 100 W. Ferry Street, Detroit, Mich. 

Louisiana Mrs. G. W. Carter 2009 S. Loyola Avenue, New Orleans, La. 

Maine Mrs. C. W. Smith 166 Granite Street. Biddeford, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. C. N. Pierpont Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Minnesota 

Mississippi Mrs. L. R. Roseby 314 E. Church Street, Jackson, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. W. H. Walker 1908 Sargeant Street. Joplin, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. J. H. Bridenbaugh. 

1109 N. Thirty-second Street, Billings, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. C. E. Hedges Central City, Neb. 

Newark Miss Victoria A. Ralph Boulevard, N. J. 

New England Mrs. J. F. Knotts 440 Newtonville .Avenue, Newlonville, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. John C. Gallup Mossup, Conn. 

New Hampshire Mrs. A. E. Baum 350 Wibird Street, Portsmouth, N. H. 



28 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

New Jersey Mrs. John Pemberton, Jr 409 Penn Street, Camden, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. C. H. Appleton 1 730 Wyoming Street, El Paso, Tex. 

New York Mrs. Fred Newell. . . . 104 Westchester Avenue, Crestwood, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. J. W. Potter 115 Woodside Avenue, Waterbury, Conn. 

North Carolina Mrs. G. Haven Caldwell. .332 W. Bragg Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. W. L. Whitcher Grafton, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. J. W. McMillan SOI University Avenue, Muncie, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Mrs. T. C. Edmonds 3141 Corydon Road, Cleveland, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. Leslie Keves. ,3509 Humboldt Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. F. H. Clark R. R. 1, Potsdam, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. F. F. Wilcox 131 South Avenue, La Porte, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. D. B. Harrington 2122 St. Aubin Street, Sioux City, Iowa. 

North-vest Kansas Mrs. T. W. Wells Hays, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. R. J. Plate 1531 Lakewood Avenue, Lima, Ohio 

Oklahoma M rs. George Pass Edmond, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. James West 1934 N. E. Forty-ninth Avenue, Portland. Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. James Walsh 3206 Sixth Avenue, Tacoma, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. K. S. Burnett 4725 Northwood Street, Frankfort, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. George H. Alexander, 

6921 Perrysville Avenue, Ben Avon, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. F. E. Clendenen 126 N. Elmwood Avenue, Oak Park, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. W. J. Harkness New Avenue, DeLand, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Catherine Phinazee 873 Water Street, Waynesboro, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Lurline Blackburn Little Rock, S. C. 

South Florida Mrs. C. R. A. Banks 905 Fourth Avenue, S., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Southern Miss Nellie Johnson 1505 W. Gandy Street, Denison, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. E. M. Edler 5503 Romaine Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. Dee Small 107 N. Vicksburg Street, Marion, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. I. A. Pointer Boley, Okla. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. G. W. Ward 306 S. G, WeUington, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. H. H. Jones 906 Main Street, Nashville, Tenn. 

Te.xas Mrs. J. O. Williams 405 Carter Street, Marshall, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. Joseph Miller 6 Borthwick Avenue. Delmar, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. Charles Keves Mt. Vernon, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. M. C. Pulliman West Point, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. A. R. Dennis 864 W. Fourth Street, S., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. Inez Perkins Northfield, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Callie A. Nelson . . .4424 Hunt Place, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

West Texas Mrs. R. E. Waters Calvert, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. W. G. Morris 1 133 Edgewood Drive, Charleston, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. D. T. Teare Augusta, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. F. J. Wharton R. F. D. No. 3, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. O. C. Hamilton 150 S. Charles Street, Waukeska, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. H. C. Perkins 4 Lincoln Avenue, Binghamton, N. Y. 

Wyoming State Mrs. C. E. Hardesty Sheridan, Wyo. 



SPIRITUAL LIFE 

.-Alabama Mrs. C. P. Watson 4309 Walnut Street, Birmingham, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. Carrie Idlette Smith Street, Atlanta, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. A. H. McKinlev 308 A Street, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Blue Ridge-.\tlantic Miss Emma Madcliff Misenheimer, N. C. 

California Mrs. B. B. Conner Kentfield, Calif. 

Central .■Mabama 

Central New York Mrs. Alice Phillips . Ill 'McAllister Avenue,' Syracuse, N.Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. W. Emerson Karns 215 W. Tenth Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Martha J. Wilkerson 4147 Papin Street, St. Louis, Mo 

Colorado 

Dakota Mrs. c'. j. Semans '.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'. .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.".".'Rapid City, 's.'d. 

Delaware Mrs. A. L. Rasin 121 W. Bayview Street, Pleasantville, N. J. 

"^''■o'' Mrs. Alex Ross 701 E. Main Street. Flushing, Mich. 

tast Tennessee Mrs. Eugenia Davis Box 452, Pocahontas, Va. 

^"«._, Mrs. K. B. Lininger Sheakleyville, Pa. 

r^ioTida Mrs. M. M. GORDEN WaldsFla 

G«nesee Mrs. W. W. Daley 126 W. Berry Street, Olean, N. Y. 

iJ^°''8'a Mrs. E. D. Carlock 31 E. Morris Street, Dalton, Ga. 

"°'"on Mrs. Ellsworth Wilson 1 701 Union Avenue, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

}5|?"°. Mrs. C. C. Albertson Blackfoot, Idaho 

'"■"O's Mrs. Gay C. White 1406 Holmes Avenue. Springfield. 111. 

Indiana. . Mrs. J. C. Voris 233 W. Broadway. Shelbyville, Ind. 

lowa-Ues Moines Mrs. S. Grant Lewis. ... 1 1 1 2 Twentv-ninth Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

i>^"f ^'s, Mrs J. W. Terrell 926 New York Avenue, Holton, Kan. 

Kentucky 

Lexington Mrs. Mildred Watkins. ....'.'.' .' Wilis' Rhode's 'Xvenue,' Chicago^ 111'. 

i:;?H'^'^"^ M'<s. Roxanna Moore 2715 Willow Street, New Orleans, La. 

?J?'".^ Mrs. Andrew McDonald 440 Woodford Street, Woodsford, Me. 

^'«=*»'Ka" Mrs. W. E. Brown Portland, Mich. 



Conference Officers. 29 



CONFERENCE 



Minnesota Mrs. W. O. Henderson 2155 Goodrich Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. Nettie Rhodes 938 Blair Street, Jackson, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. John S. Slagle 327 N. Chelsea Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. O. A. Perkins 1935 Whitman Avenue, Butte, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. F. L.Blewfield. . . . 1744 S. Twenty-fourth Street, Lincoln, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. George G. Vogel 11 W. Milton Avenue, Rahway, N. J. 

New England Mrs. B. L. Babcock 24 Shepherd Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. Edith Eldridge 301 Washington Street, Fairhaven, Mass. 

New Hampshire Mrs. Merle Steeves 21 Elm Street, Dover, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Frank T. Phillips. . . .827 Belmont Avenue, Collingswood, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. C. O. Beckman. . . 1625 E. Rio Grande Avenue, EI Paso, Tex. 

New York Mrs. E. M. Berrien 52 N. Washington Street, Tarrytown, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. Otto Brand 136 Willis Avenue, Mineola, N. Y. 

North Carolina Mrs. L. M. Winchester 425 Bennett Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. O. Grunstead Mott, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. H. E. Wright Bristol, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Mrs. J. Y. Montague 137 McDowell Avenue, Steubenville, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. George Walker, 

153 Oakwood Road, Interlachen Park, Hopkins, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. Fred Hansen Norwood, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. Roll.\ Shepherd 1226 Mulberry Street, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. Paul E. Johnson 1504 M. S. Avenue, Sioux City, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. Paul Spencer Oakley, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. Theodore McKinney. . . .2434 Ingleside Place, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. L. E. Whitman, 

1441 N. W. Twenty-fourth Street, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. E. D. Flinn 3532 S. E. Sixty-second Avenue, Portland, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest •. . . Mrs. Mary D. Eddy, 

4721 Sixteenth Street, N. E., Seattle, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. John Keiser 1032 Morgan Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. Frank L. Toy 967 Wellesley Road, Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. Charles Lyons 309 Lemont Street, Lemont, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. Addyman Smith 2411 First Avenue, N., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Jessie Smith Byrd Street, Waycross, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Ella M. Page N. Boulevard, Orangeburg, S. C. 

South Florida 

Southern Mrs. Snider Houston, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. John Oliver 116 Berkley Way, Whittier, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. J. H. Landenberg, 

458 N. Twenty-sixth Street, East St. Louis, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. F. E. Darby Cotton Plant, Ark. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. G. L. Coppedge 213 N. Walnut Street, McPherson, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. J. S. McKay 12 Murrell Street, Nashville, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. M. L. Williams Carrier No. 3, Beaumont, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. Edgar Zeh 32 Broad Street, Waterford, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. Earl Hackbarth 302 Third Avenue, N. E., Hampton, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. R. L. Sweeney VVest Point, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. C. E. Wrathall, 

635 S. West Temple, Apt. 45, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. H. A. Lougee St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Della Simms. . . 1827 Corcoran Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

West Texas Mrs. E. L. B. Richardson, 

128 N. Mesquite Avenue, San Antonio, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. T. P. Lallance. . ; 105 Fifth Avenue, Huntington, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. John Birrell Rice Lake, Wis. 

Wilmington Mrs. Mary Cadman 3 Crestwood Place, Hillcrest, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. J. R. Cotton 1260 S. Thirty-sixth Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. Reeves C. Havens Vestal. N. Y. 

Wyoming State 



SUPPLIES 

Alabama Mrs. F. E. Green 1707 Damon Street, Tarrant, Ala. 

Atlanta Mrs. Rossie Williams 18 Gates Street, Newman, Ga. 

Baltimore Mrs. C. A. Weber 514 Anneslie Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. George Kennedy Kings Mountain, N. C. 

California Miss Irene Stratton 2218 K. Street, Sacramento, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. Lela Culver Sylacauga, Ala. 

Central New York Mrs. Roy Clark 912 E. State Street, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. E. B. D.widson 34 W. Main Street, Lock Haven, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Mae Diggs 710 N. Whittier Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. John L. Spargeo Ft. Morgan, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. Frank E. Briley Dell Rapids, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. Mary B. Fokman 1224 Tatnall Street, Wilmington, Del. 

Detroit Mrs. G. A. Zeigler 755 Madison Avenue, Birmingham, Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Anna B. Norman Pulaski, Va. 

Erie Mrs. George Butt 2034 Wagner Avenue, Erie, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. Corine Brown Route 6, Box 656, South Jacksonville, Fla. 



30 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Genesee Mrs. Charles Davenport Leicester, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. B. A. Chastain Route 2, Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. W. L. Pickering 1420 Freemont Avenue, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Idaho Mrs. D. H. Showers Filer, Idaho 

IlHnois Mrs. H. W. Bailey Orion, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. Margaret Laughlin, 

1723 N. New Jersey Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

lowa-Des Moines Mrs. Victor Gunn 1438 Dean Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 

Kansas Mrs. E. W. Daniels 905 Neosho Street, Emporia, Kan. 

Kentucky Miss Pearl Hopkins 382 Earle Avenue, Covington, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. Clara F. Webster 3425 Virginia Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 

Louisiana Mrs. H. M. Haves 5207 Constance Street, New Orleans, La. 

Maine Mrs. Agnes Shellenberger 86 Floral Street, Bath, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. J. C. DeVinney, 

600 Turner Avenue, N. W., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. O. J. Finstad Windom, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. M. L. Williams 215 E. Fifth Street, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. E. L. Scweppe 602 Grundy Avenue, Trenton, Mo. 

Montana State M rs. Elmer Hanson Havre, Mont . 

Nebraska Mrs. G. N. Simpson 403 E. Thirteenth Street, Grand Island, Neb. 

Newcirk Mrs. Walter J. Greene 255 Roseville Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

New England Mrs. F. C. Howland 314 Chfton Street, Maiden, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. J. S. Bridgford 11 Medway Street, Providence, R. I. 

New Hampshire Mrs. Maud Wood 13 Washington Street, Concord, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Robert Mumford Mantua, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. C. W. Thorne. .Motor Route 3, Box 585, Albuquerque, N. M. 

New York Mrs. Albert G. Norton ... 45 Washington Street, Middletown, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. W. H. Clark 27 Hubbard Avenue, Stamford, Conn. 

North Carolina Mrs. J. E. Allen Route 1 , Box 61, Lumberton, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. G. W. Best Hoople, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. Ward Painter Middletown, Ind. 

North-East Ohio Mrs. Lloyd R. F. D. No. 5, Wooster, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. A. B. Church 4928 Upton Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. Robert Young Little Falls, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. T. W. McCail 436 Detroit Street, Hammond, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. Thomas Birkett 340 K Street, Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Mrs. W. W. Enyeart Jamestown, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. John T. Vance 67 E. Twelfth Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. W. E. Garden 323 N. Cleveland Avenue, Gushing, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. P. J. Voth 814 S. Church Street. Dallas, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. R. J. Greenstreet Cashmere, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. David Rush 1234 N. Redfield Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Mrs. W. R. Newell. . . 22 S. Harrison Avenue, Bellevue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. C. A. Donnel 6140 Kimbark Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. Friend B. Hoyt Box 77, Station A, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. C. Emma Lewis 1219 E. Waldburg Street, Savannah, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Julia A. Jones 40 S. Washington Street, Sumter, S. C. 

South Florida 

Southern Mrs. John B. Looby 3109 jena Street, New Orleans, La. 

Southern California Mrs. F. W. Boerner 671u Benson Street, Huntington Park, Cahf. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. Earl Hamilton 207 W. Reed Street, Benton, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. E. Beasley 604 N. E. Second Street, Oklahoma Citv, Okla. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. H. S. Gibson 621 S. C, Arkansas City, Kan. 

Tennessee Miss Bertha GUeen 4S0 State Street, Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. C. V. Adair 3620 Bremond Street, Houston, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. L. E. Barker 16 Washington Avenue, Rensselaer, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. Robert Sanders 1326 Leavitt Street, Waterloo, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. G. M. Chisholm Greenville, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. E. A. Hall 532 Center Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. Percy Newton Bradford Vt 

Washington Mrs. Ida W. Norris 2337 Druid Hill Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

West Texas Mrs. M. S. McCollough Corpus Christi, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. W. S. Speece 1045 Ann Street, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. Sadie Spangenberg Tomah, Wis 

Wilmington Mrs. John Jolls Middletown, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. Robert Farley 352 Morris Street, Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Wyoming. Mrs. Gilbert Hinton 33 Maple Avenue, Carbondale, Pa. 

Wyoming State Mrs. M. L. Hendrickson . . .355 S. Jackson Avenue, Casper, Wyo. 



THANK OFFERING 

Alabama Mrs. O. G. Waid 300 Hollywood Blvd.. Birmingham, Ala; 

n u- ¥.^^- J"'-'-'^ Ables 507 Mitchell Street, S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

Ri„i"2°J5^»'4;r ":■ r;"*^- h f-^- ^^^^^ Allen 1719 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic Mrs. A. Fulcher Oracoke, N. C. 

Tpnf rir aiVko;^ ^''^- ^r^i'^^i^ Juvinall San Rafael, Calif. 

Central Alabama Mrs. W. L. Brown 120O First Street, N., Birmingham, Ala. 



Conference Officers. 31 

CONFERENCE NAME ADDRESS 

Central New York Mrs. F. W. Manly Phoenix, N. Y. 

Central Pennsylvania Mrs. C. W. Fields 425 Mifflin Street, Huntingdon, Pa. 

Central West Mrs. Mary Clark Georgia Street, Louisiana, Mo. 

Colorado Mrs. G. W. Inman La Junta, Colo. 

Dakota Mrs. Fred Stotmeister Harrold, S. D. 

Delaware Mrs. M. L. Hel.m 192 Bloomfield, Montclair, N. J. 

Detroit Mrs. W. E. Harrison 50.S Roosevelt Avenue, Ypsilanti. Mich. 

East Tennessee Mrs. Mae P. Campbell 943 E. State Street., Bristol, Tenn. 

Erie Mrs. J. A. Lyons 9 North High Street, DuBois, Pa. 

Florida Mrs. Fannie Thomas 962 W. Thomas Street, Gainesville, Fla. 

Genesee Mrs. A. T. Pollock Portville, N. Y. 

Georgia Mrs. W. M. Bishop 108 East Point Street, East Point, Ga. 

Holston Mrs. Kitty Lamons Greeneville, Tenn. 

Idaho Miss Eva White Boise, Idaho 

Illinois Mrs. Frank Auth 466 W. Eldorado Avenue, Decatur, 111. 

Indiana Mrs. D. H. Richards 904 Busseron Street, Vincennes, Ind . 

lowa-Des Moines 

Kansas Mrs. H. V. B. Pickering 340 W. Pine Street, Junction City. Kan. 

Kentucky Mrs. H. C. Beach . . 1009 Winding Way, Kenton Hills, Covington, Ky. 

Lexington Mrs. S. P. Jenkins 635 S. Center Street, Springfield, Ohio 

Louisiana Mrs. Betty Johnson. . . .916 S. Fourteenth Street, Baton Rouge, La. 

Maine Mrs. Elsie Hoyt Cushings Points, South Portland, Me. 

Michigan Mrs. A. I. Gilbert 227 Marshall Street, Lansing, Mich. 

Minnesota Mrs. W. A. Riley 1305 N. Cleveland Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Mississippi Mrs. H. B. McCann 1326 Thirty-fifth Avenue, Meridian, Miss. 

Missouri Mrs. R. D. Williams 4137 San Francisco Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Montana State Mrs. W. C. Packer 520 N. Davis Street, Helena, Mont. 

Nebraska Mrs. N. B. Foutch 614 W. Twenty-first Street, Kearney, Neb. 

Newark Mrs. J. Francis Burrowes 25 Girard Place, Maplewood, N. J. 

New England Mrs. Alex Logan 200 Beethoven Avenue, Waban, Mass. 

New England Southern Mrs. Milton C. Slade 222 Atlantic Avenue, Lakewood, R. I. 

New Hampshire Mrs. W. B. Sanborn 39 Gale Avenue, Laconia, N. H. 

New Jersey Mrs. Fred C. Brown Stratford, N. J. 

New Mexico Mrs. Elbert Sloat Raton, N. M. 

New York Mrs. P. Y. Kamenoff 2010 Valentine Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

New York East Mrs. F. H. Cupps 1141 Bergin Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

North Carolina Mrs. Lubertha Thompson P. O. Box 47, Johns, N. C. 

North Dakota Mrs. J. Jacobson Mott, N. D. 

North Indiana Mrs. E. E. Youse Markle, Ind. 

North- East Ohio Mrs. John Seward 902 N. Sixth Street, Cambridge, Ohio 

Northern Minnesota Mrs. I. M. Cook 3145 Irving .A. venue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northern New York Mrs. Charles Wallace Black River, N. Y. 

Northwest Indiana Mrs. Gustav Schlosser 502 S. Jackson Street, Frankfort, Ind. 

Northwest Iowa Mrs. J. G. Waterman Fenton, Iowa 

Northwest Kansas Miss Eva Rigg Kirwin, Kan. 

Ohio Mrs. H. J. Holcombe 222 W. Fourth Street, Greenville, Ohio 

Oklahoma Mrs. C. E. Park 913 W. Third Street, Tulsa, Okla. 

Oregon Mrs. John H. Carkin 735 Stewart Street, Salem, Ore. 

Pacific Northwest Mrs. W. F. Zobrist 2586 Fourth Street, W., Seattle, Wash. 

Philadelphia Mrs. H. C. Leonard 645 W. Ellett Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Miss Carrie N. Dixon 2000 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rock River Mrs. C. W. Poorman 424 N. Oak Park Avenue, Oak Park, 111. 

St. Johns River Mrs. O. I. Lenfers Davenport, Fla. 

Savannah Mrs. Jennie "Eubanks ^32 Thirty-seventh Street, Savannah, Ga. 

South Carolina Mrs. Lillian Wilson Care of 401 N. Cait Street, Florence, S. C. 

South Florida 

Southern Mrs. Thomas Merrei.l 4319 Deere Street, Dallas, Tex. 

Southern California Mrs. Esther M. Edler 5503 Romaine Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Southern Illinois Mrs. Frank C. Smith 1460 College Avenue, East St. Louis, 111. 

Southwest Mrs. Lillie Knox Hughes, .-^rk. 

Southwest Kansas Mrs. R. S. Kirk St. John, Kan. 

Tennessee Mrs. H. P. Gordon 2332 Herman Street, Nashville. Tenn. 

Texas Mrs. M. J. Baker Box 40, Palestine, Tex. 

Troy Mrs. Ralph Santosvvosso 4 Berncliff Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Upper Iowa Mrs. Harry Wright. .321 Fourteenth Street, N. W., Mason City, Iowa 

Upper Mississippi Mrs. M. L. Cole Clarksdale, Miss. 

Utah Mission Mrs. N. A. Dunyon 23 H Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Vermont Mrs. Eldon Martin St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Washington Mrs. Minnie L. Harvey 2224 Druid Hill Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

West Texas Mrs. L. M. Hall 1406 E. Twelfth Street, Austin, Tex. 

West Virginia Mrs. M. F. Snider 224 E. Main Street, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

West Wisconsin Mrs. Carey Dennis Platteville, Wis. 

Wilmington Miss N. Blanche Price P. O. Box 1456, Wilmington, Del. 

Wisconsin Mrs. Harriet Stewart 8201 Warren Avenue, Wauwatosa, Wis. 

Wyoming Mrs. Roy Henwood Sherburne, N. Y. 

Wyoming State Miss Marie Newell Riverton, Wyo 



Workers in National Projects 

ALASKA AND THE NORTHWEST 

Jesse Lee Home, Seward, Alaska 

Founded: 1890 at Unalaska; moved to Seward in 1925 
Capacity: 120 residents 

Aim: To give a Christian home and industrial training to the homeless children of 
Alaska 

Mr. Harold Newton, B.A., Superintendent 

Mrs. Harold Newton, B..\.. .•\ssistant Superintendent 
tMiss Isabelle Knapp, Girls' Matron 
*Miss Naomi Coger, Girls' Matron, Sewing 
tMiss Edna Jones, B.A., Girls' Matron, Librarian 
♦Miss Elizabeth Bonney, Boys' Matron, Kindergartner 
tMiss Blanche Thornton, R.N., Nurse 

Mr. Tracy Clarke, Farm and Boys' Worker 

Mrs. Tracy Clarke, Girls' Matron 

Mr. Dean Bedford, Farm and Boys' Worker 

Mrs. Dean Bedford, Boys' Matron 

Miss Anna Gould, Dietitian 

Miss Susan Gould, Assistant Dietitian 



Seward General Hospital, Seward, Alaska 

Founded: 1930 

Capacity: 22 beds 

Aim: Christian hospitalization 

Miss Elizabeth J. Geijsbeek, Superintendent 
*Miss Ruth Murrell, Head Nurse 

Miss Ethel Anderson, R.N., Nurse 

Miss Hazel Johnson. R.N., Nurse 

Miss Alta Peterson, R.N., Nurse 

Miss Abbie Rouse, R.N., Nurse 

Miss Alice Lloyd, Technician 
*Miss Ethel Ard, Office 

Mrs. Marie Bondi, Dietitian 

Mrs. Minnie Belle Muir, Assistant Dietitian 

Lavinia Wallace Young Mission, Nome, Alaska 

Founded: 1913 

Aim: To provide a religious and recreational program for the Eskimo, and to de 
velop native Christian leadership 

Miss Pearl Woodfin, Superintendent 

Maynard-Columbus Hospital, Nome, Alaska 

Founded: 1913 

Capacity: 21 beds 

Aim: To serve the sick of Nome and surrounding community 

Dr. Thomas Morcom, M.D., Superintendent 
Miss Alice Hoplund, R.N., Nurse 
Miss Lennie Mae Nelson, R.N., Nurse 
Miss Rude. R.N., Nurse 



Unalaska Mission, Unalaska, Alaska 
Founded: 1903 

Aim: To serve in a vast expanse of territory on the Aleutian Islands where no other 
Protestant missionary work is carried on 

Rev. J. Dean King, B.A., Superintendent 
Mrs. J. Dean King, Assistant Superintendent 



♦Deaconess. tEnrolled Missionary. 

32 



Workers in National Projects. 33 

Catherine Blaine Home, 318 Eleventh Avenue, Seattle, Wash. 

Founded: 1912 
Total Number Served: 6,172 

Aim: To help the Japanese people to have a deeper personal knowledge of Jesus 
Christ 

fMiss Mary Winchell, Superintendent 
Rev. Ton Sakahara, Young People's Pastor 

Helen Kelly Manlev Community Center, 2828 S. W. Front Street, Portland, Ore. 

Founded: 1912 

Aggregate Attendance: 54,321 

Aim: To serve the present age by teaching Christ's way of living 

fMiss Ethel Decker, Superintendent 

Miss Eunice Allen, B.A., Music, Office, Clubs 
*Miss Millicent Fuller, R.N., Nurse, Physical Education 

Miss Aubrey Gibson, Home Economics 

Mr. S. Willard Hilton, Boys' Director 

Miss Gladys Harding, B.F..^., Religious Education 

Mrs. Irene Taylor, Kindergartner 

CALIFORNIA AND HAWAII 

Angel Island, U. S. Immigration Station, San Francisco, Calif. 

Since 1910 daily visitation to Immigration Station 
Aim: Christian service to strangers within our gates 

*Miss Katharine R. Maurer (1441 Jones Street) 

Chinese Home, 940 Washington Street, San Francisco, Calif 

Founded: 1893 

Capacity: 40 residents; enrollment, 35; 60 kindergarten children 

Aim: Christian home and training for Chinese girls 

fMiss Isabel Fleming, Superintendent 
*Mrs. Anna Othiem, Assistant Superintendent 
♦Miss Mary E. Hill, Kindergartner 
fMiss Mabel Wiggins, Nursery Matron 

Miss Helen Palmer. B.M., Dormitory Matron 
*Miss Bertha McCreight, Kitchen Matron 

Miss Harriet Fish, Music (part time) 

Miss Rose Jang, Language (part time) 

Mrs. Amy Chan, R.N., Daily Visitation 

Dr. David K. Chang, Physician on Call 

Ellen Stark Ford Center, 2025 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Founded as children's home in 1906; closed in 1935 and community work established 
Aim: To conduct a Christian community center in co-operation with the Japanese 
Methodist Church 

Rev. S. E. Nauman 

Chinese Bible Woman and Home Visitor, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Mrs. Loy Chan (2309 East Third Street, Los Angeles) 

Frances DePactw School, 4952 Sunset Boulevard. Los Angeles, Calif. 

Founded: 1899 

Capacity: 100 residents; enrollment, 95 

Aim: A Christian home and school for Mexican girls 

fMiss Helen Aldrich, Acting Superintendent 
fMrs. Nettie Kennerly, Assistant Superintendent 

Miss Margaret Carnighan, M.A., Teacher (High School) 

Miss Delia Lovato, B.A., Teacher (High School) 

Miss Elizabeth Jane Smith, B.S., Teacher (High School) 
fMiss Louise Murray, B.A., Teacher (Junior High) 
fMiss Faye Straley, B.A., Teacher (Grade) 

Miss Doris White, Teacher (Grade) 

Miss Norine Parker, B.E., Music 

Miss Mildred Rohrs, B.A., Home Economics 

Miss Thelma Laidoner, Athletics, Language Adjustment Class 
fMiss Cora Mitchell, Social Service, Business Course 
fMiss Mabel Edwards, Matron 
fMiss Nellie Jones, Matron 

Miss Bertha Hamilton, Laundry Matron 

Mrs. Delia Miller, Kitchen Matron 

, Kitchen Matron 



♦Deaconess. fEnroUed Missionary. 



34 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Jane Couch Center, 1224 West Thirty-Fifth Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Founded: 1912 as children's home. Closed in 1933 and community work begun 

in 1935 
Aim: To conduct a Christian community center in co-operation with the Japanese 

Methodist Church 

Rev. Lester Suzuki 

Mexican Border Work 

Aim: A community work among Mexicans in Calexico and Mexicali co-operating 
with the Board of Home Missions 

♦Miss Ruth E. Ferguson (406K Mary Avenue, Calexico, Calif.) 

Susannah Wesley Home, 1143 Kaili Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Founded: 1899 

Capacity: 100 residents; enrollment, 90 

Aim: A Christian home and training for girls of many nationalities 

Miss Frances L. Taylor, B.S., Superintendent 
Mrs. Grace Monsen, Assistant Superintendent 
Miss Ada Clark, Sewing 
Mrs. Alpha White, High School Mother 
Miss Mary Moore, Intermediate Supervisor 
Miss Marion Frank, Junior Supervisor 
Miss Loretta Rolf, Junior Supervisor 
Miss Myrtle Swick, Junior Supervisor 
Miss Beatrice Hayashi, Cooking 
Mr. T. Tsuruma, Yardman 
Mrs. T. Tsuruma, Janitress 
Mrs. Oda, Laundress 



CITY MISSIONS 
CENTRAL 

Campbell Settlement, 2244 Washington Street, Gary, Ind. 

Founded: 1914 

Enrollment: 2,058; total attendance, 91,075 

Aim: To develop Christian friendliness in a bi-racial community 

Mr. Gilbert W. Collins, B.S., Superintendent 

Mrs. Gilbert W. Collins, B.A., Matron 

Miss Nettie Arnold, B.A., Worker with Negro Women and Children 

Mr. Warren Arthur, Physical Director 

Mrs. Warren Arthur, Girls' Worker 

Miss Billie Bradley, Office Employment 

Mr. Nick Lefko, Boys' Worker 

Miss Bertha Sabo, Office Assistant 

Marcy Center, 1539 South Springfield Avenue, Chicago, III. 

Founded: 1883; new building, 1930 

Enrollment: 6,109; attendance, 202,068 

Aim: To demonstrate the Christian life in a Jewish community 

tMiss Anna Heistad, Superintendent 

tMiss Fae L. Daves, Girls' Worker 

fMiss Eda Jacobson, Children's and Adult Worker 

Mrs. Isabel C. Freeman, Assistant Girls' Worker 

Miss Annie Golley, Assistant Children's and Adult Worker 
tMiss Bertha Engel, Office Secretary 

Miss Madaline Overhulser, Nurse 

Miss Mina Klayman, Music 

Mr. Forrest Freeman, Director Boys' Work 

Mr. Gordon Hearn, Club Leader 

Mr. David Misner, Physical Director 

Mr. Hymie Levine, Assistant Boys' Work 

Mrs. Harriet Seeds, Housemother 

Dr. Henry Siegel 

Dr. Norman Shure 

Dr. Louis Terman 

Dr. Martin Urist (Nose and Throat) 

Dr. Nathan Lazar (Eye) 

Dr. S. Goldberg (Dentist) 

Dr. E. D. Uditsky (Dentist) 



♦Deaconess. fEnrolled Missionary. 



Workers in National Projects. 35 



Newberry Avenue Center, 1335 Newberry Avenue, Chicago, III. 

Founded: 1883 

Enrollment: 985; attendance, 71,330 

Aim: To develop Christian character in an unchristian environment 

Mr. Arlington A. Smith, Head Resident 
Miss Genevieve Byrne, Head Girls' Worker 
Miss Dympna Dowling, Assistant Girls' Worker 
Mr. Verner Begg, Head Boys' Worker 
Miss Virginia Hegg, Home Service 
Miss Jane McCredie, Secretary 



Peek Home, Polo, III. 

Founded: 1916; new building, 1930 

Capacity: 48 residents 

Aim: To give a Christian home to homeless children 

tMiss Grace E. Brandes, Superintendent 
*Miss Laura Robbins, B.A., Girls' Matron 

Miss Avis Gatz, Girls' Matron 

Mrs. W. O. Kelley, Boys' Matron 
*Miss Ruth Grunert. Practical Home Economics 

Mr. W. O. Kelley, Farm Manager 



CENTRAL WEST 



East St. Louis Settlement, 1132 North Ninth Street, East St. Louis, III. 

Founded: 1910 

Enrollment: 650 

Aim: To provide all phases of an active program for a community center 

tMiss Lillie R. Sheffer, Superintendent 
tMiss Mae Z. Badger, Kindergartner 
tMiss Ethel Vanek, Assistant Kindergartner 
tMiss Monica Purviance, Nursery Director 
tMiss Mary Carol Cone, Nursery Assistant 
tMiss Lena Larcom, Parish Worker 
tMiss Emma Vanek, Housemother 



Epworth School, Elm and Marshall Place, Webster Groves, Mo. 

Founded: 1909 

Capacity: 50 residents; enrollment, 47 

Aim: To provide a home and school for "problem girls of teen age' 

Miss Elva Lee Perry. Ph.B., Director and Social Worker 
Miss Helen Pierce, M.A., Superintendent 
tMiss Esther Claus, B.-i^., Teacher 

Miss Hilda Huppert. Vocational Teacher and Social Worker 
Mrs. Leta Sands, Domestic Arts. Relief 
Mrs. Myrtle Myall, Housemother 
Mrs. Ella Ross, Housemother 



Mothers' Jewels Home, York, Neb. 

Founded: 1900 

Capacity: 100 residents; enrollment, 87 

Aim: A Christian home for normal dependent children 

Rev. J. N. Smith, B.A., Superintendent 

Mrs J. N. Smith, B.S., Assistant Superintendent 
tMiss Helen Meredith. M.A., Girls' Matron. Social Worker 

Mr. William Coupland. Boys' Director 

Mrs. William Coupland. Boys' Matron 
tMrs. Winifred Roe, Girls' Matron 
tMiss Frieda Wirz. R.N., Girls' Matron, Nurse 

Mr. H. M. Pangborn, Boys' Director 

Mrs. H. M. Pangborn, Boys' Matron 

Miss Leona Pearson. Babyfold Nursery 

Miss Sara Reger. Babyfold Nursery 



♦Deaconess. tEnroUed Missionary. 



36 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

EAST CENTRAL 

Esther Hall, 221 West Ninth Street, Cincinnati. Ohio 

Founded: 1891 

Capacity: 38 residents 

Aim: A Christian home for young business women and students 

Miss Sadie Markee, Superintendent 

Mrs. Joanna Milligan, Assistant Superintendent 

McCrum Community House, 26 Nutt Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Founded: 1909 
Reaching 500 

Aim: To minister to the physical, mental, social, and spiritual needs of residents of 
the coke villages of Fayette County, Pa. 

tMiss Bessie K. Van Scyoc, Superintendent 
JMiss Ethel Van Duren, Kindergartner 

Oliver No. 1, Uniontown, Pa. 

tMiss Bozena Sochor. Kindergartner, Club Worker 

Leisenring No. 3, R.F.D., Dunbar, Pa. 

tMiss May L. Webster, Superintendent 
tMiss Edna C. Poole, Club Worker 
Miss Louise Goldsmith, Kindergartner 

FRIENDSHIP HOMES 

Friendship Home, 549 West Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Founded: 1920 

Capacity: 24 residents 

Aim: A Christian home for young Negro women away from home 

tMrs. Willa F. Stewart. Superintendent 
Miss Jimmie Rae Hayes, B.A.. Assistant Superintendent 

Mothers' Memorial Center, 547 West Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Founded: 1920 
Total Enrollment: 1,312 

Aim: A center for the care, training, and wholesome recreation for Negro children, 
young people, and adults 

tMrs. Willa F. Stewart, Superintendent 
tMiss Ethel M. Miles, B.S., Assistant 
tMrs. Effie V. Madden, Assistant 
Miss Helen E. McCreary, Assistant 
tMiss Myrtle E. Thompson, B.A., Nursery School 

NORTH EAST CENTRAL 

Blodgett Memorial Community House, 950 Peace Street, Hazleton, Pa. 

Founded: 1905 

Total attendance for year. 28,359; average monthly enrollment. 763 
Aim: To be a friend to the needy and to exercise a Christian influence in the com- 
munity 

tMiss Grace Bate. Superintendent 

Miss Dorothy Gage. Social Worker 
tMiss Genevieve Bartkiewicz, Director at Harwood 

Miss Muriel Manning. Director at Hollywood 
tMiss Dorothy Marsh. Kindergarten, Clubs 
*Miss Mildred Avery. Housekeeper 

Mr. Edgar Kessel. Boys' Worker 

North Barre Community Center, 101 Smith Street, Barre, Vt. 

Founded: 1908 

Total attendance for year, 22,130; average monthly enrollment, 373 

Aim: To help bring a vital Christian experience to the people of the community 

tMiss Frances K. Calkins, B.R.E., Superintendent 
tMiss Helen V. Miller, B.R.E., Religious Education 

Miss Lorna Ford. Kindergartner 

Miss Mildred Ralston. Housekeeper 

Mr. H. Osgood Bennett, B.S., Boys' Worker 



♦Deaconess. tEnrolled Missionary. 



Workers in National Projects. 37 

Italian Settlement, 615 Mary Street, Utica, N. Y. 
Founded: 1906 

Total attendance for year, 22,199; average monthly enrollment, 465 
Aim: Friendship and guidance for the foreign-born and their children that they 
may be Christian Americans 
tMiss Helen Marie Edick, Superintendent 
tMiss Ruth Wright, Arts and Crafts 
JMiss Dorothy Norton, Home Economics 
tMiss Genevieve Poppe, Nursery School 
Miss Erna A. Smith, Nursery School 
Miss Margaret McDonald, Housekeeper 
Mr. Carl Mazzo, Boys' Worker 



WEST 

Iowa National Esther Hall, 921 Pleasant Street, Des Moines, Iowa 
Founded: 1931 
Capacity: 90 residents 

Aim: A Christian boarding home for young business women and students 
Mrs. J. M. Williams, Superintendent 
*Miss Leona Gill, Office Secretary 

, Matron 

Miss Mabel Fisher, Assistant Matron 

Bingham and Copperfield, Utah 
Founded: 1936 

Aim: To assist the Methodist Episcopal Church in these large mining communities 
with hundreds of children to be trained for the church 
*Miss Frances Irene Knerr 

Davis Esther Hall, 347 South Fourth East Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 
Founded: 1883 as Deaconess Home; 1936 as Esther Hall 
Capacity: 14 residents 

Aim: A Christian home for working girls and students 
Mrs. Margaret Platts, Superintendent 
*Miss Nelle Wright, B.R.E., Conference Religious Educational Director 

Esther Hall, 475 Twenty-Fifth Avenue, Ogden, Utah 
Founded: 1913 
Capacity: 25 residents 

Aim: A Christian boarding home for young women 
*Miss Anna Corneliussen, Superintendent 
Miss Hazel Cooper, Matron 
Miss Grace Wasem, B.A., Parish Worker, First Methodist Episcopal Church 

Highland Boy Community House, Route 1, Box 30 B, Bingham Canyon, Utah 

Founded: 1918 

Reaching hundreds in Sunday school, church, kindergarten, classes, and groups 
Aim: To build Christian American lives 
*Miss Ada B. Duhigg, Superintendent 
Miss Alice V. Brown, Kindergartner 
*Miss Marie Button, Community Worker 
Miss Vera Duhigg, R.N., Matron-Nurse 

Marysvale, Utah 

Founded: 1935 
Mrs. Ruth Savin Gififen, Pastor 

Pavillion Project, Riverton, Wyoming 

Founded: 1935 

Aim: To build a Christian community in a large rural district 
*Miss Marie Newell, Parish Worker 
*Miss Grace Arnold, Parish Worker 

Rock Springs. Wyoming 

Settlement founded 1915 

Aim: To assist the pastor of the church to build a Christian community 
*Miss Sarah Taylor 



♦Deaconess. fEnroIled Missionary. 



3S The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

HOSPITALS 

Brewster Hospital, Seventh and Jefferson Streets, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Founded: 1901 

Capacity: 75 beds; 32 student nurses 

Aim: To be a teaching institution and health center; building health and character 
into the lives of a large group of Negro people 
Mr. Fred W. Kelley, Superintendent 
Miss Elin Von Goertz, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Bertha E. Kartell, Bookkeeper 
*Miss Mary Anderson. B.S., Librarian 

*Miss Lora Edwards, B.A., Religious Education, Housemother 
Miss Grace Reardon, Secretary 
Miss Vernis Fraser, B.A., Dietitian 
Miss E. E. Moore, Technician 
Miss Ethel Harris, R.N., Supervisor 
Miss Matilda Walker, R.N., Surgical Supervisor 
Miss Hettie Thompson, R.N., Night Supervisor 
Mis.s Susie Davis, R.N., Floor Supervisor 
Miss Ruth A. Barnes, R.N., Instructor 
Mr. Albert Folsom, Technician 
Dr. Arthur C. Signer, Resident Physician 

Medical Mission Dispensary, 36 Hull Street, Boston, Mass. 

Founded: 1894 

Dispensary patients: 13,884 

Aim: To help the sick and underprivileged both physically and spiritually 
Miss Catherine L. Perry. R.N., Superintendent 
Miss Frieda Landfors, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Lillian Hoyt, R.N., Clinic Nurse 
Miss Sadie Kendall, R.N., Clinic Nurse 
Miss Gladys Puderbaugh, B.S., Dietitian 
Miss Viola Valvo, Admitting Clerk 

Miss Dorothy Wetherald, Medical Social Service Worker 
Dr. Rosario Gori, Resident Physician 
Dr. Dom:nic Ferruci, Resident Physician 
Dr. Louis Sciarillo, Resident Physician 
Dr. Frank Ames, Visiting Dentist 
Dr. Adrian Solo, Visiting Surgeon 

Sibley Memorial Hospital, 1140 North Capitol Street, Washington, D. C. 

Founded: 1894 

Capacity: 347; 60 student nurses 
Dr. Lewis H. Taylor, M.D., President 
Mrs. Helen Shoemaker, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses 
Mrs. Elsie Casassa, R.N., Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Gladys Jorgensen, M.A., R.N., Instructor of Social Sciences 
Miss Lillian Fisher. R.N., Instructor of Nursing Arts 

Miss Mary Ruth Cross, M.A., Instructor of Nutrition and Dietetics, Assistant Dietitian 
Miss Katherine Heiberger, R.N., Operating Room Supervisor 
Mrs. Harriet Dutton, R.N., Supervisor of Student Health Service 
Mrs. Josephine Blackman, R.N., Supervisor of Delivery Room; Instructor in Delivery Room 

Technique 
Miss Stella Dinkelspiel, R.N., Supervisor of Obstetrical Nursing 
Mrs. Flora Roseneau, R.N., Supervisor of Obstetrical Nursing 
Miss Florence Whitaker, R. N., Supervisor of Obstetrical Nursing 
Miss Janet Jensen, R.N., Surgical and Medical Supervisor 
Miss Millina Realini, R.N., Surgical and Medical Supervisor 
Mrs. Helen Simms, R.N., Surgical and Medical Supervisor 
Mrs. Loretta Wood, R.N., Assistant Medical and Surgical Supervisor 
Miss Ruth Overly, R. N.. Assistant Obstetrical Supervisor 
Mrs. Mae Murray, R.N., Assistant Delivery Room Supervisor 
Miss Viola Strawsbaugh, R.N., Assistant Delivery Room Supervisor 
Mrs. Lucille Dennis, R.N., Assistant Operating Room Supervisor 
Miss Wilhelmina Goudelock, R.N., Head Nurse, Nursery 
Miss Hazel Hinds, R.N., Head Nurse, Surgery 
Miss Ella Lee Large, R.N., Head Nurse, Surgery 
Miss Mabel Kramer, R.N., Head Nurse, Obstetrics 
Miss A. C. Jennings, R.N.. Head Nurse, Obstetrics 
Miss Lucy Scaggs. R.N., Head Nurse, Male Surgical 
Miss Frances Gladden, R.N., Head Nurse, Female Surgical 
Miss Gertrude Norden, R.N., Head Nurse, Medicine 
Miss Elizabeth Buxton. R.N., Head Nurse. Private Floor 
Miss Rowena Roberts. Chief Dietitian 

Miss Josephine Zaneski, R.N., Secretary of Training School Office 
Miss Mary Pickering, R.N., Hostess, Hospital 
Mrs. Beulah Mumford, R.N., Admittance Nurse 
Miss Louise Welch, R.N., Admittance Nurse 
Mrs. Augusta Colman, R.N.. X-ray Technician 
Miss Caroline Reece, Executive Assistant to the President 
Miss Edith V. Youngquist, Treasurer 
Mrs. Pearl B. Swann, Dietitian Nurses' Residence 
*Miss Alta Ice, Director of Religious and Social Activities 
Miss Anna L. Roat, Hostess, Rust Hall 
Miss Hazel King, Housekeeper, Rust Hall 
Mrs. Oneida Robertson, Housekeeper, Hospital 

♦Deaconess. 



Workers in National Projects. 39 

INDIAN 

Navajo Methodist Mission School, Farmington, N. M. 
Founded: 1890 
Enrollment: 108 residents 
Aim: To train the Navajo Indians for Christian leadership 

Mr. Charles C. Brooks, B.A., Superintendent 

Mr. Virlin Metzger, B.A., Assistant Superintendent and Farm Supervisor 

Mr. Willard P. Bass, B.S., Principal and Coach 
tMiss Gladys Hays, Upper Grades 

Mrs. Roy True, B.A., Intermediate Grades 
tMiss Mabel Huffman, Primary Grades 

Miss Etta Devine, B.S., Home Economics 

Miss Margaret Jones, B.M., Music 

Mr. William M. Malehorn, B.A., English 

Mr. Roy True, Th.B., Shop Teacher and Boys' Supervisor 

Miss Dorothy Ivey, Office Secretary 
tMiss Bessie UUery, Boys' Housemother 

Mrs. Virlin Metzger, Girls' Housemother 

Miss Bertha Vanden Hoek. R.N., Nurse 
tMrs. Mary A. Leckliter, Kitchen Matron 

Miss Katy Clark, Assistant Kitchen Matron 

Mr. Glenn Girdner, Dairyman 

Ponca Methodist Mission, Ponca City, Okla. 

Founded: 1885 

Reaching over 700 Indians 

Aim: A Christian center for Ponca Indians and neighboring white residents 
Rev. Don J. Klingensmith, B..\., Superintendent 
Mrs. Don J. Klingensmith, Assistant Superintendent 

Potawatomi Methodist Mission, Mayetta, Kan. 

Founded: 1903 

Reaching over 250 Indians 

Aim: A Christian center for Indians 
Rev. J. H. Schlapbach, Superintendent 
Mrs. J. H. Schlapbach, Assistant Superintendent 

Yuma Methodist Mission, Yuma, Ariz. 
Founded: 1904 
Reaching 300 Indians 

Aim: To furnish community life and religious training for Yuma and Cocopah 
Indians 
Rev. Adolph M. Krahl, Superintendent 
Mrs. Adolph M. Krahl, Assistant Superintendent 
Mr. James Hammond, Interpreter 



MEXICAN AND THE SOUTHWEST 

Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Maternity Hospital, 1109 East Fifth Street, 
El Paso, Texas 
Founded: 1921 
Capacity: 18 beds 

Aim: To help bring health and happiness to the Spanish-speaking people 
tMiss Emma Brandeberry, Superintendent 
tMiss Millie Rickford, R.N., Head Nurse 
tMiss Jessie Belden. B..A.., R.N., Nurse 
Miss Thelma Shepherd, R.N., Nurse 

Dr. Mildred Lee Murray, M.D. (Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat) 
Dr. Jesson L. Stowe, M.D. (Maternity) 
Dr. Charles Rennick, M.D. (Baby and Child Specialist) 
Mrs. Grace G. Pina, Office Secretary 

Rose Gregory Houchen Settlement, 1119 East Fifth Street, El Paso. Te.xas 
Founded: 1893 

Reached more than 13,000 last year 

Aim: .A. settlement and recreation center for Spanish-speaking people in the con- 
gested section of El Paso 
tMiss Emma Brandeberry, Superintendent 
tMiss Kate Frazier, Home Economics 
Miss Hester Easley, B.A.. Girls' Worker 
tMiss Dorothy Little, Kindergartner 
Miss Margaret Bauman, B.A., Kindergartner 



tEnroUed Missionary. 



40 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Harwood Girls' School, 1114 North Seventh Street, Albuquerque, N. M. 
Founded: 1887 
Capacity: 90 residents 

Aim: A home and school to help develop Christian character and leadership among 
Spanish-speaking girls 
jMiss Verr H. Zeliff, Superintendent 

tMiss Mary Schickedantz, M.A., Principal and Teacher (High School) 
Miss Mary Huffstutter, B.S., Teacher (High School) 
*Miss Carrie Miller, B.S., Teacher (High School) 
fMiss Pauline E. Scranton, B.S.. Teacher (Vocations) 
Miss Clara M. Case, B.Di., Teacher (Grade) 
Miss Donna Loew, B.A., Teacher (Grade) 
Miss Louise Weaver, B.S., Teacher (Grade) 
tMiss Iva Maye Carruth, B.A.. Music 
Miss L. Evangeline White, B.A., Commercial Teacher 
fMiss Louise Cushman, B.A., Home Economics 
Miss Eula Nyhouse, B.S., Social Service 
fMiss Phoebe P. Powell, Housemother 
Miss Florence L. Peel, Housekeeper 
Miss Isabel Aitken, Ph.B., Practical Home Economics 
Miss Lucy Whiteman, B.S., Practical Home Economics 
Mrs. Ruth Harding, Nurse 

Methodist Sanatorium, Albuquerque, N. M. 
Founded: 1912 
Capacity: 65 beds 

Aim: To give nursing care to tubercular patients 
*Mrs. Minnie G. Gorrell, Superintendent 
Miss Alta M. Tucker, R.N., Head Nurse 
Mrs. Ellen Bankston, Nurse 
Miss Lulu Lowe, Nurse 
Mrs. Ida Smith, Nurse 
Miss Avoline Spry, Nurse 
Mrs. Frieda Hoffman, Dietitian 
fMiss Mary H. Pittard, Housekeeper 
Mrs. Nina Reader, Housekeeper 
Miss Regina C. Chini, Office Secretary 



MOUNTAINEER 
GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE 

Ethel Harpst Home, 740 Fletcher Street, Cedartown, Ga. 
Founded: 1923 
Capacity: 100 residents 

Aim: To give a real home and Christian nurture to dependent and underprivileged 
children from the mountain districts of Georgia 
fMiss Ethel Harpst, Superintendent 
Miss Victoria Perry, Girls' Matron 
Miss Gertrude Sink, R.N., Nurse 
♦Miss E. Louise Nichols, Secretary, Music Teacher 
Miss Audrey Wall, Boys' Matron 
Miss Katherine Gilliland, Girls' Matron 
Miss Edith Evans, Dietitian 

Deborah McCarty Settlement House, Cedartown, Ga. 
Founded: 1913 
Capacity: SO day students 

Aim: To aid the people of the cotton-mill villages 
fMiss Ethel Harpst, Superintendent 
fMiss Florence Vann, Kindergartner, Club Worker 
Mrs. Carl Thomas, Assistant Kindergartner and Club Worker 
Mrs. Bessie Wilson, Superintendent of Day Nursery (Paid by Goodyear Rubber Co.) 

Elizabeth Ritter Hall, Athens, Tenn. 
Founded: 1891 
Capacity: 88 residents 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for women students attending Tennessee Wes- 
leyan Junior College and to help worthy students secure an education 
*Mrs. Elizabeth Brubaker, M.A.. Superintendent, Dean of Women, Bible 
fMrs. Anita Collins, Assistant Superintendent, Nurse 
fMiss Ethel Pryor, B.S., Home Economics 
Miss Lois Fenn, B.S., Dietitian 
Mrs. Nora Thompson, Assistant Housekeeper 
Miss Marjorie Alderfer, B.R.E., Teacher 



♦Deaconess. fEnrolled Missionary. 



Workers in National Projects. 41 

KENTUCKY, MISSISSIPPI, AND NORTH CAROLINA 

Erie School, Aiken Hall, Walker Neighborhood House, Olive Hill, Ky. 

Founded: 1913 

Capacity: 63 residents; 104 day students 

Aim: To provide Christian education and training in homemaking for mountain 
girls and children 

tMiss Edna Lukens, B.S., Superintendent 
JMiss Ruth Adams, B.A., Principal 

Mrs. Edna Coble Whitson, B.A., Religious Education 

tMiss Esther Edwards, B.S., Home Ek:onomics • 

JMiss Eunice Thomas, M.A., Latin, Science 
JMiss Helen Holliday, B.A., Social Science 

Miss Valma Motes, B.S., Music, Physical Education 
tMiss Grace Reuter, Teacher (7th and 8th grades) 

Miss Beryl Miller, Teacher (4th, 5th, and 6th grades) 
tMiss Gertrude Morgan, Teacher (1st, 2d, and 3d grades) 
tMrs. Margaret Weatherstone, R.N., Nurse 

Mr. Wayne Leitch, Vocations 

Mrs. Cordia Tabor, Dietitian 

Mrs. Thurl Huff, House Director 

Mr. Thurl Huff, Caretaker 

Pfeiffer Junior College, Misenheimer, N.C. 

Founded 1903 

Capacity: 165 resident students 

Aim: To train men and women to be spiritually alert, mentally alive, socially 
equipped, and physically fit to meet life's situations 

Mr. W. S. Sharp, M.A., D.Ed., President 

Mr. Exiward W. Seay, M.A., Dean of Instruction 

Mrs. Frank Armfield, B.S., History, Social Science 

Mr. Frank Armfield, M.A., History, Language 

Mr. Geo, S. Boase, M.S., Science 

Mr. Robert W. Conboy, M.A., Language 
tMiss Emma L Madciff, M.S., Mathematics 
tMiss Ervilla Masters, M.S., Home Economics 

Miss Edythe Moore, M.S., Commerce 

Miss Edith Rylander, B.Mus., Music 
tMiss Maud Spencer, M A., English 
tMiss Veda Stryker, M.S., Religious Education 

Mr. Wilmer H. Tolle, M.S., Science, Physical Education 

Miss Helen Aull, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian 
tMiss Mabel Edgerton, Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Anna Rawson, House Director, Merner Hall 

Mrs. E. C. Carpenter, House Director, Cline Hall 

Mrs. Helen Dunn, House Director, Rowe Hall 

Mrs. Geo. Boase, House Director, Freeman Hall 

Miss Jane L. Wilson, M.S., Dietitian 

Mr. Hubert Selle, Engineer 

Mr. J. Eldon King, Practical Farmer 

Miss Evelyn Miller, Assistant Dietitian 

Wood Junior College, Mathiston, Miss. 

Founded: 1885 

Capacity: 110 residents; 150 non-residents 

Aim: To provide Christian education for young people of limited financial resources 
and train them for intelligent Christian leadership 

Rev. Jasper Weber, Ph.B., D.D., President 

Mrs. Stella M. Weber, B.A., Registrar 

Miss Esther Compton, M.A., Mathematics 
tMiss Julia Drake, M.A., History, Social Science 
tMiss Corinne Garner, M.A., English 
tMiss Frieda Gipson, M.A., Education, Psychology 

Mr. Brooks Haynes, B.S., Music 
tMiss Sylvia Huitema, B.A., Commerce 

Mr. Charles J. Jacobs, M.A., S.T.B., Th.D., English, Religious Education 

Miss Elma S. Jones, M.S., Home Economics 
tMiss Mary C. Okey, B.S., Science 

Miss Mary Pierce, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian 

Miss A. Mabel Taylor, M.A., Modern Languages 

Mr. Benjamin H. Thompson, B.S., Science, Horticulture, Dairying 

Mr. Alvin K. Banman, M.S., Agriculturist 

Mr. Gerhard E. Roe, B.S., Industrial Arts 
tMrs. F. A. Hendricks, Director of Miller Hall 

Mrs. Frank B. Wilson, Director of Wood Hall 

Miss Ethelyn Hester, Secretary 
tMiss Glenna Ford, Dietitian 

Miss M. Smith, Assistant Dietitian 



tEnroUed Missionary. 



42 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

NEGRO 

Allen Home and School. 331 College Street, Asheville, N. C. 

Founded: 1887 

Capacity: 45 residents; ISO day students 

Aim : To serve the Negro people of western North Carolina in furnishing educational 
opportunities that cannot otherwise be provided 

tMiss Carmen Lowry, M.S., Superintendent 
fMiss Julia Titus, B.A., Principal 

Miss E. Louise McConnell, B.A.. French, History, Sociology 
tMiss Gertrude Meredith, M.S., Latin, English, Librarian 
tMiss Julia Noell, B.S., Science 

Miss Jennie Hann, B.A., Teacher (5th and 6th grades) 

Miss F. Mozelle Albright, B.S., Home Economics (Clothing) 

Miss Estelle E. Harris, B.S., Home Economics (Foods) 
tMiss Isabelle R. Jones, Music 

tMiss Anna E. Scudder, M.A., Religious Education 
tMiss Mabel Weir, B.S., Dietitian 

Miss Bess Van Deusen, M.A., History, Extension Work 

Mrs. Belle Lewis, Office Secretary 

Boylan-Haven Home School, Jessie and Franklin Streets, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Founded: 1886 

Capacity: 55 residents; 150 day students 

Aim: To train Negro girls for Christian living 

tMiss A. Jennette Lehman, Superintendent and Principal 
tMiss Mary T. Ale.xander, .\ssistant Superintendent 
tMiss Ella Bebermeyer, B.A., History 

Mrs. Onah Bell Hawkins Taylor, B.A., French, Latin 

Miss Wilhelmina Gilbert, B.A., Science, Physical Education 

Mrs. Pauline Smith, B.A., Mathematics 

Miss Louise Singletary, B.A., Engl sh. Community Work 

Mrs. Sallie Blocker, Home Economics (Clothing) 

Miss Willie Guy Sykes, B.A., Home Economics (Foods) 

Mrs. Alice M. Taylor, B.M., Music 

Miss Helen E. Hillhouse, B.A., Religious Education 
tMiss Georgia A. Hurd, Office Secretary 

Browning Home and Mather Academy, Camden, S. C. 

Founded: 1886 

Capacity: 100 residents; 225 day students 

Aim: To train boys and girls for leadership through Christian education 

Miss Clara F. Sykes, M.A., Superintendent 
tMiss Lulu B. Bryan, B.A., Principal 

Miss Woodie Collier, B.A., Mathematics 

Mr. E. L. Marsh, B.S., Science 

Mr. J. Wendell Martin, B.A., History, Athletics 
tMiss Frances Peacock B.A., English 

Miss Golda Tague, B.A., French 

Miss" Beatrice Reynolds B.A.. High School 

Miss Addie Pickett, B.A , Junior High School 
tMiss Lulu Breckerbaumer, B.A., Teacher (5th and 6th grades) 

Miss Mattie O. Evans, B.A., Teacher (3d and 4th grades) 

Mrs. J. R. Harper, B.A., Teacher (1st and 2d grades) 

Mr. J. R. Harper, B.S., Industrial Arts 
*Miss Avis Wallace, M. A., Music 
*Mrs. Edith Carter, Music 

Miss Alma Metcalfe, B.A., Religious Education 

Miss Wilma Wigham, B.S., Librarian 

Miss Annie Eaton, B.S., Home Economics (Clothing) 

Miss Etta E. Duren, B.S., Home Economics (Foods) 
tMiss Caryl Moar, B.A., Financial Secretary 

Miss Evelyn V. Gittens, B.S. Dietitian 

Miss Lelia C. Lewis, B.A., Domestic Supervisor 

Mr. James Aiken, B.S., Agriculturist 

Eliza Dee Hall, Co-operative, Samuel Huston College, 1203 East Avenue, Austin, Texas 

Founded: 1888 

Capacity: 50 residents; enrollment 48 residents, 37 day students 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for the college girls 

♦Miss Vievie M. Souders, Superintendent 

Mrs. Elizabeth McKeoun, M.A., Home Economics (Clothing) 
tMiss Ethel Keith. M. A., Home Economics (Foods) 

Miss Jessie Ford, B.S., Domestic Supervisor 



*Deaconess tEnrolled Missionary. 



Workers in National Projects. 43 

E. L. Rust Hall, Co-operative, Rust College, Holly Springs, Miss. 

Founded: 1884 

Capacity: 60 in Rust Hall; 50 in college dormitory; enrollment in two dormitories, 

88; 50 day students 
Aim: A Christian home for college and high school girls 

Miss Elfleda Myser, M.A., M.R.E., Superintendent 
Miss Ruth E. Collins, Office Secretary 
fMiss Clara Woods, M.S., Home Economics (Clothing) 
Miss Harriette Carlos, B.S., Home Economics (Foods) 
Miss Ida Gooden, Domestic Supervisor 
Miss Alberta Michael, Supervisor College Dormitory 

Thayer Hall, Co-operative, Clark Unixersitv, South Atla.nta, Ga. 

Founded: 1883 

Capacity: 70 residents; enrollment 68 residents, 65 day students 

Aim: A Christian home for the college girl 

tMrs. Winifred Myser Smith, B.A., Superintendent and Dean of Women 

Miss Marie R. Vernon, M.A., Assistant to the Dean, Chaperon 
fMiss Fannie Bell Gore, Assistant Superintendent 
fMiss Lucille Campbell, B.A., Office Secretary 

Miss Mildred Kenyon, M.S., Home Economics (Foods) 

Mrs. Arra B. Robinson, B.S., Home Economics (Clothing) 

Miss Constance Arnold, M.A., M.R.E., Director of Woman's Work in Gammon Theological 
Seminary 

Peck Hall, Co-operative With Gilbert Academy, 5323 Pitt Street, New Orleans, La. 

Founded: 1889 

Capacity: 50 residents; enrollment 25 residents, 298 day students, 30 night school 

students 
Aim: A Christian home and school for Negro boys and girls 

fMrs. D. M. McDonald, B.A., Superintendent 
Mrs. Margaret Davis Bowen, M.A., Principal Gilbert Academy 
Mrs. Louise Fife Guilyot, Home Economics 
Miss Marjorie Lee, B.A., Teacher (Mathematics) 
Miss Laura Tucker, B.A., Teacher, Librarian 
Miss Rose Milton, Domestic Supervisor 

Sager-Brown Home, Baldwin, La. 

Founded: 1921 

Capacity: 60 residents; enrollment, 50 residents, 30 day students 

Aim: A Christian home for homeless Negro boys and girls 

*Miss Agnes M. Little, Superintendent 

Miss Gladys Crawford, B.A., Principal 
*Miss Dorothy Strine, Teacher 

Miss Carrie Patillo, B.A., Teacher 
fMiss Rosa A. Cobb, B.A., Home Economics 

Miss Gwendolyn C. Gilkes. Music 

Mrs. Elizabeth Reed, Boys' Matron 

Mrs. Charlotte O. Johnson, Girls' Matron 

Mrs. Elnora Bernard, Kitchen Matron 

Mr. Charles Wright, Farmer 

Italian Kindergarten. 609 Esplanade Avenue, New Orleans, La. 

Founded: 1884 

Enrollment: 75 (6 nationalities) 

Aim: Christian training for children of foreign parents 

Mrs. Hazel Palmisano, Superintendent and Kindergartner 
Mrs. Ella Palmisano, Assistant 

Faith Community Center, 526 South^Claiborne Avenue. New Orleans. La. 

Founded: 1915 

Enrollment: 265 

Aim: Christian training for children and youth 

fMiss Eva Callaway, Superintendent 
♦Miss Margaret McLaughlin, Kindergartner 

Miss Evelyn Evans, Assistant Kindergartner, Club Work 

Mrs. May T. Ward, Girls' Club Work 

Mrs. W. A. Adams, Boys' Club Work 



♦Deaconess. fEnrolled Missionary. 



44 The Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

JOINT ADMINISTRATION WITH BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C. 

Founded: 1926 

Capacity: 173 residents; 77 day students 

Aim: To give college education to young Negro women 

Mr. David D. Jones, M.A.. LL.D., President 

Mr. Pritchett A. Klugh. M.A., Dean of the College, Chemistry 
JMr. William J. Trent, Jr.. M.A., Economics 

Miss Flemmie P. Kittrell, Ph.D., Dean of Students, Home Economics 

Miss Willa B. Player, M.A., Registrar, French, Latin 

Mrs. Theophile, C. Taylor, B.A., Business Manager 

Miss Mildred A. Burris, M.A., Physical Education 

Miss Beulah E. Cooper B.A., Librarian 

Mr. R. Nathaniel Dett, D.Mus., Music 

Mrs. R. Nathaniel Dett, M.Mus., Music 

Mr. Leonard E. Davis, M.A., Education 

Mr. W. Edward Farrison, Ph.D., English 

Miss Virginia P. Foster, M.A., Physical Education 

Mrs. Osceola Adams, M.A., Dramatics 

Mrs. Marian G. Wyatt. M. S., Home Economics 

Miss Eva K. Hamlin. Art 
JMiss Lydia M. Jetton, B.S., Home Economics 

Mrs. Grace Hayes Johnson, M.A., History (part time) 

Miss Coragreene Johnstone, M.A., English 

Mr. William A. Banner, B.D., Philosophy, Religion 

Mr. James T. Morton, Jr., M.A., Psychology, Education 

Miss Merze Tate, B. Litt., History, Sociology 

Mr. Timothy R. Wells, M.S., Chemistry, Biology 

Miss L. Feme Wood, M.A., French 

Mrs. L. E. Davis, M. Ed.. Assistant Nursery School 

Mr. F. Nathaniel Gatlin, B.S., Music 

Miss Frances Johnson, M.A., History 

Mrs. B. R. Raiford, M.A., French 



PUERTO RICO AND NEW YORK 

George O. Robinson School, P. O. Box 966, San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Founded: 1902 
Capacity: 65: enrollment, 75 

Aim: To provide a Christian home and elementary school for children who have no 
home 

Mrs. Estella S. Howard, B.A., Superintendent 
Miss Esther Feliciano, Spanish 
Miss Virginia Linden, B.M., Music 
Miss Nazen Kazian, M.S., Sewing and Crafts 
Miss Gertrude Montgomery, B.S., Physical Education 
tMiss Ruth McKinnon, History, English 
Mrs. Esther Nunez, Teacher (3d and 4th grades) 
Miss Gloria DeZengitita, Teacher (1st and 2d grades) 
Miss Helen Parry, M.A., Mathematics and Science 
Miss Alta Rivera, Housekeeper * 

Miss Carolina Ortiz, Dietitian 



Kindergartens 

Founded: 1901 
Capacity: 176 

Aim: To provide a wholesome environment and Christian influence for the pre- 
school child 

tMiss Bernice Huff, M..^., Director 

Miss Mercedes Nunez. Teacher First Grade, McKinley Kindergarten, Sol Street, San Juan 
Mrs. Carmen Perez, Teacher at Ponce Kindergarten 
Mrs. Maria Maldenado. Teacher at Barrio Brera Kindergarten 
Miss Marita Rosich, Teacher at .A.ibonito Kindergarten 



tEnrolled Missionary. JOn leave of absence. 



Workers in National Projects. 45 

Santo Domingo (Co-operative Work) 

Mr. Barney Morgan, Cuidad Trujillo, Field Director 

Mrs. Carolyn McAfee Morgan, Cuidad Trujillo, Music 

Miss Eunice A. Baber, Superintendent of Nurses, Hospital Internacional, Cuidad Trujillo 

Medical Staff — Dr. Arturo Damiron 

Dr. R. R. Cohen 

Dr. Manuel F. Pimentel 



Alma Mathews House, 273 West Eleventh Street, New York, N. Y. 

Founded: 1889 
Capacity: 22 residents 

Aim: A Christian co-operative house for business and professional women of the 
lower-salaried group 

Miss Maurine Paas, M.R.E., Director 



Japanese Bible Woman, New York, N.Y. 

Mrs- Tokuji Komuro (323 W. 108th Street, New York, N. Y.) 



REST HOMES 

Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Founded: 1896 

Capacity: 60 residents 

Aim: A cheerful, happy home for retired missionaries and deaconesses 

Mrs. Orah T. Hilkert, Superintendent 

Mrs. Ida K. Latshaw, Associate Superintendent 

Miss Nellie LaPorte, Head Nurse 

Mrs. Marion Cunard, Nurse 



Robincroft Rest Home. 275 Robincroft Drive, Pasadena, Calif. 

Founded: 1925 

Capacity: 18 residents 

Aim: A cheerful, happy home for retired missionaries and deaconesses 

fMiss Mabel M. Metzger, Superintendent and Nurse 



Chautauqua Mission House, Chautauqua, N. Y. 

Founded: 1923 

Capacity: 20 residents 

Aim: A vacation home for missionaries 



Superintendent 



Fenton Memorial Home, Chautauqua, N. Y. 

Founded: 1917 

Capacity: 8 deaconesses 

Aim: A vacation home for deaconesses 

♦Miss Claribel Winchester, Hostess 



Thompson Rest Home, Mountain Lake Park, Md. 

Founded: 1899 

Capacity: 40 residents 

Aim: A vacation home for missionaries and deaconesses 

♦Miss Octavia Hicks, Superintendent 



♦Deaconess. fEnrolIed Missionary. 



46 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

COMMITTEES 

David and Margaret Home for Children, La Verne, Calif. 

Founded: 1910 

Capacity: 105 residents 

Aim: To maintain a Christian home for homeless ch' dren 

Mr. W. D. Michener, Superintendent 

Mrs. Ethna C. Michener, Assistant Superintendent 

Mrs. Lillie P. Kuns, Senior Boys' Matron 

Miss Ida Clements, Senior Girls' Matron 

Mrs. Cora Parker. Junior Boys' Matron 

Miss Sarah Charles, Junior Girls' Matron 

Mrs. Catherine Fox, Nursery Boys' Matron 
♦Miss Josie Ragle. Nursery Girls' Matron 

Miss Edna Wehrman, R.N.. Nurse 

Mrs. Almeda Tapp, Relief Matron 
♦Miss Ada M. Tarr, Matron 

Esther Hall, 2580 C Street, San Diego, Calif. 

Founded: 1921 

Capacity: 25 residents 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for business and school girls away from home 

tMrs. Clara B. Butler, Superintendent 



The National Training School for Christian Workers, Fifteenth Street and Denver 
Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

Founded: 1899 

Capacity: 80 residents 

Aim: To train workers for various types of educational, social, and religious service 

under the Society and to provide opportunity for others who may wish training 

for Christian work 

♦Miss Anna Neiderheiser, D.Pd., President 

♦Miss Ruth E. Decker, Ph.D.. History. Philosophy 

♦Miss Louise Dutcher, B.A., English Literature. Physical Education 

Miss Nina Griffith, Piano 
♦Miss Aletta M. Garretson, M.A., Bible and Education 
♦Miss Martha M. Hanson, B.A., Home Economics 
♦Miss Elizabeth Hartman, M.A., Christian Education 

♦Miss Grace Hutcheson, B.E.. Christian Education, Early Childhood Education 
♦Miss Dale C. Keeler, B.R.E., Christian Education 
♦Miss Minnie Pike, Ph.B , Science and Spanish, Office Secretary 

Miss Ellen E. Smith, M.A., B.D., Bible, English 
♦Miss Mary F. Smith, M.A., Early Childhood Education 
tMiss A. Louise Sumwalt, B.A., Music 

Miss Eureath White, B.A., Th.M., Social Science 

Rev. Mills M. Anderson, B.A.. S.T.B.. Christian Doctrine 

Rev. J. B. Bisceglia. Th.D., Italian 

Mrs. George W. Miller, B.E., Parliamentary Law 
♦Miss Anna Banman. Office Assistant 
♦Miss Eunice Britt, B.A., Field Representative 
♦Miss Bertha Cowles. B.S., Dietitian 
♦Miss Pearl M. Eddy, Field Representative 

Miss Hazel Gilmore, Assistant to Dietitian 

Miss Nettie Judd, Librarian 
♦Miss Anna Oltmanns, School Nurse, Housekeeper 
♦Miss Grace A. Vause, Stenographer 



SPECIAL 

Leper Work, Carville, La. 

Rev. A. Preston Boyd, Chaplain of U. S. Marine Hospital, No. 66 

Soldiers and Sailors, Portsmouth Navy Yards, Portsmouth. N. H. 
♦Miss Edith L. Smith (383 Pleasant Street. Portsmouth, N. H) 



♦Deaconess. tEnrolled Missionary. 



Workers in Conference Projects 

BALTIMORE- 
BALTIMORE Deaconess Home, 605 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Founded: 1892 

*Miss Nancy E. Dorey, Superintendent 

*Miss Julia Beach 

*Miss Neoma May Harris 

*Miss Mary C. Hedinan 

*Miss Mary Lou Huck 

*Miss Ruth E. Kitzmiller 

*Miss Helen D. Long 

*Miss Dorothy J. Troutman 

Swartzell Methodist Home for Children, 6200 Second Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Founded: 1912 

Capacity: 60 residents 

Aim: To make a real home for normal Protestant children 

Miss Dorothy E. Grafflin, Superintendent 
Mrs. O. F. Gregory, Girls' Matron 
Miss Ethel Stier, Nursery Matron 
Mrs. Frank Smith. Boys' Matron 
Mr. Frank Smith, Boys' Counselor 

Washington Deaconess Home, 2907 Thirteenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 

Founded: 1889 

*Miss Mae Smith. Superintendent 
*Miss Dixie F. Carl 
*Miss Viola Sanders, B.S.L. 
*Miss Helen E. Newman 
*Miss Lily Schwab, B.S. 

Wo-Ho-Mis Lodge, 607-609 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Founded: 1919 

Enrollment: 65 residents 

Aim: A home for business women of many nationalities and many denominations 

Mrs. M. V. Hubbard, Superintendent 

CALIFORNIA— 

Beulah Rest'Home. 4690 Tompkins Avenue, Oakland, Calif. 

Founded: 1900 
Capacity: 43 residents 

Aim: A rest home for ministers, missionaries, deaconesses, and retired Christian 
workers 

Miss Lurene Seymour, Superintendent 

San Francisco Deaconess Work 
Founded: 1901 
*Miss Ella Baker (3256 Twenty-first Street. San Francisco, Calif.) 

CENTRAL NEW YORK— 



Italian Mission, Church of the Redeemer, 212 Catawba Street, Syracuse. N. Y. S ) ^ 

C^ '^ 'I 



Founded: 1915 

Reaching 400 people 

Aim: To bring to the Italian people the more abundant life 7ff 

Miss Elizabeth J. Taylor, B.A. 



Saint John's Italian Mission, West Sixth Street, Elmira, N.Y. 

Aim: To serve the Italian people through church activities 
Mrs. Josephine Buono 
♦Deaconess. 

47 



48 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA— 

Harrisburg Deaconess Center, 1220 North Seventh Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Founded: 1901 
Enrollment: 379 

Aim: To uphold Christian standards of living, provide Christian training, and en- 
rich lives through Christian fellowship 

*Miss Ula M. Garrison, Superintendent and Industrial Worker (265 Cumberland Street) 
*Miss Bertha M. Rogers, Kindergartner and Industrial Worker (265 Cumberland Street) 

Italian Methodist Episcopal Church, 804 Sixth Street, Altoona, Pa. 

Founded: 1906 
Reaching 300 people 

Aim: To minister to the people in this lailroad center and help them to find Christ 
as their friend and guide 

*Miss Anna K. Nestor (1128 8th Avenue) 

Mission, Kulpmont, Pa. 

Aim: A fourfold program for the building of Christian characters in a mining town 

Mission, Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

COLORADO- 
DEACONESS, Leadville, Colo. 

Enrollment: 412 

Aim: To carry on a Christian community work in this mining town, especially with 
the children and young people 

*Miss Rachel Pease 

Margaret Evans Deaconess Home, 1630 Ogden Street, Denver, Colo. 

Founded: 1898 

Mrs. Cora B. Hold, Superintendent 
*Miss Martha Bebermeyer 
*Miss Iva Tibbetts 
*Miss Minnie M. Robison 
*Miss Alice M. Funk 

DELAWARE- 
FRIENDSHIP Home, 1939 North Twenty-Second Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Founded: 1923 
Capacity: 17 residents 

Aim: To give to the business, domestic, or school girl friendship and a Christian 
home at a moderate cost 

tMrs. Eleanor P. Thomas, Superintendent 
Miss Viola Cooper, Matron 

DETROIT- 
CITY Missions, Detroit, Mich. 

Detroit Deaconess Home, 437 Putnam Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Founded: 1889 

*Miss Florence K. Eslinger, Superintendent 
*Miss Bernice Anderson 
*Miss Sally Chesser 

Miss Mildred Cline 
*Miss Florence Daniels (569 Elizabeth Street, East, Detroit) 
*Miss Doris Devore (Westlawn Methodist Episcopal Church) 
*Miss Jennie Eddington (190 Ford Avenue, Highland Park) 

Miss Edna Ruth Hayes 

Miss Mary Belle Stewart 

Miss Beulah Woodcock 
*Miss Lois Zimmerman 



♦Deaconess. tEnroIled Missionary. 



Workers in Conference Projects. 49 

Detroit Esther Hall. 1191 Merrick Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Founded: 1922 

Capacity: 40 residents 

Aim: A Christian home for working girls 

Miss Lillie M. Macomber, Superintendent 
Mrs. Edith Bacon, Assistant to Superintendent 

Detroit Friendship Home, 6100 Scotten Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Founded: 1927 

Capacity: 9 residents 

Aim: A Christian home for Negro working girl 5 

Mrs. Maude Bowdoin, Superintendent 

Erie- 
Irene Maitland Deaconess Home, 107 Phillips Street, New Castle, Pa. 
Founded: 1910 

*Miss Ida Schnackel, Superintendent 
*Miss Alma E. Wolverton 

Ruth M. Smith Children's Home, Sheffield. Pa. 

Founded: 1921 

Capacity; 30; present enrollment 21 

Aim: A Christian home for homeless and dependent children 

tMiss Dora M. Feldman, B.A., Superintendent 
Miss Gladys R. Mudford, Girls' Supervisor 
Miss Zoe Hersh, Boys' Supervisor 

GENESEE— 

Buffalo Friendship Home, 300 Jefferson Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Founded: 1924 

Capacity: 14 residents 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for self-supporting Negro girls 

Mrs. Margaret Smith, Superintendent 
Mrs. Ann L. Billingslea, Assistant 

Methodist Deaconess Home and Settlement House, 24 Kosciuszko Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Founded: 1890 

Enrollment: 1.100 

Aim: Christian Americanization among Polish-Americans 

*Mrs. Emmeline Lonsdale, Superintendent 

*Miss Marie H. Frakes, Religious Education 

*Miss Fannie L. Graves, Domestic Science, Parish Work 

Mr. Russell Renner, Boys' Worker 

Miss Lola B. Timm, -Associate Worker, Office Secretary 

Miss Donna Evans 

ILLINOIS- 
CUNNINGHAM Children's Home, Urbana, III. 

Founded: 1895 

Capacity: 80 children 

Aim: To provide a Christian home and training for children from broken homes 

Mrs. Charlotte Fitzgerald. Superintendent 

Miss Luverne Waltmire, Office Secretary 
tMiss Emily Guigou, Boys' Matron 

Miss Margaret Fulton. Primary Girls' Matron 

Miss Ellen Gustafson, Junior Girls' Matron 
*Miss Ethel Wolf, Intermediate Girls' Matron 

Miss Cleo Lawyer, Nursery Assistant 

Mrs. Laura Mills, Supply Matron 

Miss Ethel Blair, House Matron 

Miss Ilia Wood, Kitchen Matron 

Mrs. Ed. Epperson, Laundry Matron 

Mr. Ed. Epperson, Farmer 

Langleyville Settlement House, Langleyville. III. 

Founded: 1924 

Aim: To serve a foreign constituency in a mining settlement 

tMiss Zoe L. King, Superintendent 



♦Deaconess. tEnroUed Missionary. 



50 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

INDIANA— 

Glenburn-Van Hook Mission, Linton, Ind 
Founded: 1923 

Aim: A place for worship and service 
*Miss Nola D. Yoder (360 H Street, N.W.) 

Indiana Conference Deaconess Home, 1241 North New Jersey Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Founded: 1915 
*Miss Mae Ledgerwood, Housemother 
*Miss Irene S. Duncan, Bible Teacher 
*Miss Edna L. Muir, Parish Worker 
*Miss Vera C. Nicklas, Parish Worker 

lOWA-DES MOINES— 

BiDWELL Deaconess Home, 921 Pleasant Street, Des Moines, Iowa 
Founded: 1893 

Enrollment: In sewing class, 123 

Aim: To bring a vital Christian experience to homes, groups, individuals through 
a well-organized religious, educational, and social program 
*Miss Hannah K. Binau, Supervisor of Social Service Department 
*Miss Sylvia M. Rankin, B.S.L. 

Riverside Community House, S.E. Fourteenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa 
Founded: 1909 
Enrollment: 150 

Aim: To exemplify the spirit of Christ in all activities 
*Miss Sylvia M. Rankin (921 Pleasant Street) 
Miss Edith Compton (3116 Rollins Avenue) 

KANSAS— 

Methodist Mexican Mission, 1044 South Twenty-Sixth Street, Kansas City, Kan. 
Founded: 1921 
Enrollment: 350 

Aim: To serve a Mexican community among whom we are the only Protestant 
missionary organization 
*Miss Catherine Ferguson, B.A., Superintendent 



Italian Methodist Episcopal Churches, 130 Federal Street and 360 Warren Avenue, 
Portland, Maine 
Founded: 1904 
Church membership: 168 

Aim: To develop Christian-American citizens through the activities of the only 
Protestant work among Italians in Maine 
*Miss Agnes E. Vose 

MICHIGAN— 

Aldrich Deaconess Home, 523 Lyon Street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Founded: 1894 
*Miss Lela I. Powers 
*Miss Rosa M. Bradley 

Miss Letta Adams (1208 Third Street, Kalamazoo) 
*Miss Mildred Hewes (1138 Maywood Avenue, Kalamazoo) 
*Miss Katherine Stroven (1407 Cooper Street, Jackson) 
*Miss Mary E. Shoemaker (308 W. Goguac Street, Battle Creek) 

Esther Hall, 523 Lyon Street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Founded: 1920 
Capacity: 26 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for working girls 
Mrs. Kathryn C. Peasley, Housemother 

Olnev Rest Home, Ludington, Mich. 

Aim: A desirable vacation place for missionaries and deaconesses 
Mrs. Nellie McFarland, Superintendent 

♦Deaconess. 



Workers in Conference Projects. 51 



MINNESOTA- 



GIRLS' Club, 181 West College Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

Founded: 1917 
Capacity: 28 residents 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for business girls and women 
Mrs. K. Elden GuUette, Housemother 



MISSOURI— 

Oronogo, Mo. 

Founded: 1921 
*Miss Bernice Johns, Pastor, Methodist Episcopal Church 

Sheffield Neighborhood Center, Sheffield, Kansas City, Mo. 

Founded: 1919 
Enrollment: 500 

Aim: To create a spirit of Christian brotherhood among Mexicans, Greeks, and 
Americans 

*Miss Gladys Hobbs (East Fifteenth Street and Denver Avenue) 



NEBRASKA- 
OMAHA City Mission, 2201 Cass Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Founded: 1922 
Enrollment: 1,044 

Aim: To befriend and uplift the people of the neighborhood by Christian contact, 
inspiration, and instruction 

*Miss Alice McCurry, Superintendent 

Miss Johanna Anderson, B.F.A., M.S.E., Music 
*Miss Flora B. Bennett, Sewing, ReHgious Education 

Mr. Dean S. Collins, B.A, B.Th., Boys' Worker 
*Miss Ruth K. Fricke, Craft, Nursery, ReUgious Education 
*Miss Ruby N. Owens, Cooking, Recreation, Religious Education 



NEWARK- 
NEWARK Deaconess Home, 219 Fairmount Avenue, Newark, N. J. 
Founded: 1899 

Mrs. Lillian Beidelman, Superintendent 
*Miss Lillian B. Ellis (605 Villa Avenue., Port Richmond, Staten Island. N. V.) 

Mrs. Grace Griffiths 
*Miss Rebecca A. Robertson 



NEW ENGLAND— 

Hattie B. Cooper Community Center, 36 Williams Street, Roxbury, Mass. 

Founded: 1916 
Enrollment: 381 

Aim: To minister to the underprivileged people In the heart of the Negro section 
of the south end of Boston 

Miss Frances Barber, Superintendent 

Miss Ella Bynoe, Nursery Worker 

Mrs. R. D. Kinney, Sewing, Arts, and Crafts 

Mrs. Effie MacKerrow, Music 

Miss Lilian R. A. Stone, ReHgious Education 

Mrs. John Wallace, Natural Expression 



NEW ENGLAND SOUTHERN— 

Silver Lake Center, 267 Pocasset Avenue, Providence, R. I. 



Aggregate monthly attendance: 500 

Aim: To provide a religious and social life for Italians 

♦Miss Ethel Young (136 Prairie Avenue) 



♦Deaconess. 



52 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

NEW JERSEY- 
NEW Jersey Conference Deaconess Home and Community Center, 278 Kaighn Avenue, 
Camden, N.J. 
Founded: 1912 
Enrollment: 800 

Aim: To provide a Christian community center 
*Miss Harriet E. Laney, Superintendent 
♦Miss Ethel M. Agans, Social Worker 
*Miss Leota E. Kruger, Nursery School, Club Worker 
*Miss Myrtle E. Pylman, Physical Education, Club Worker 

NEW YORK east- 
Jefferson Park Parish, 407 East 114th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Founded: 1894 

Aim: A religious and social center for Italians (This conference contributes to the 
fresh-air work at Long Branch, N. J.) 

Brooklyn Deaconess Home and Industrial School, 902 President Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Founded: 1890 

Enrollment: 200 

Aim: Through the industrial school to serve a congested Italian community by 
rehgious and industrial teaching 
*Miss Alice I. Leonard, Superintendent 
*Miss Martha E. Burnton 
*Miss Sarah D. Church 
*Miss Gertrude M. Davey 
*Miss Alice Hedell, B.S. 
*Miss Nellie Mae Keneval 
*Miss Grace E. Merwin 
*Miss Minnie F. Peppiatt 
*Miss Lois Tice 

NORTH-EAST OHIO— 

Cleveland Deaconess Home and West Side Community House, 3000 Bridge Avenue, 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Founded: 1890 

Total attendance, 110,668; enrollment, 3,257 

Aim: To serve human need and train to physical, mental, and spiritual power 
♦Mrs. Luella M. Evelsizer, Superintendent 
fMiss Frances Ballou 
♦Miss LaDonna Bogardus, B.R.E. 

Miss Edna J. Brand 
♦Miss Elizabeth M. Brown, B.A., R.N. 

Miss Mary Louise Chapman 
♦Mrs. Mildred B. Cheever 

Miss Lydia E. Gerhart 
♦Miss Louise E. Gill 
♦Miss Lura Goodier, B.A. 

Miss Florence Hawes, B.A. 

Miss Stella Johnston 
♦Miss Dorothy A. Judd 
♦Miss Ruth Lancaster 
♦Miss Effie M. Lewton 

Miss Emily Maiolatesi 
♦Miss Grace McCallister 
♦Miss Lalah McClellan 
♦Miss Beatrice McKee 
♦Miss Elizabeth S. McLaughlin 
♦Miss Orpha Moffet 

Miss Evelyn Niswander 
♦Miss Edith E. Porter 
♦Miss Edna M. Rhodes 
♦Miss Gertrude G. Saathoff 
♦Miss Electa Schaefer 
♦Miss Emma M. Smith 
♦Miss Martha O. Smith 
♦Miss Emma Lou Tucker 
♦Miss Bernice R. Whipple, B.E. 

Mr. Jack Bale, B.A. 

Mr. Frank Larimer 

Guernsey Valley Parish, Kings Mine and Trail Run, Ohio 
Founded: 1910 
Enrollment: 568 

Aim: To serve the people of two communities 
♦Miss Julia A. Lakey (902 North Eighth Street, Cambridge) 
Mrs. Ada Armer 



♦Deaconess. fEnroUed Missionary. 



Workers in Conference Projects. 53 

HoLLOWAY Deaconess Home, 303 Howard Street. Bridgeport. Ohio 
Founded: 1900 
♦Miss Mary J. Lockhart, Superintendent 
♦Miss Rena M. Crawford. Ph.B. 
♦Miss Ruth E. Holt, B.A. 
♦Miss Nellie M. Schwab 
♦Miss Miriam R. Stauffer 
♦Miss Exlna M. Stephan 
♦Miss Nellie O. Stevens 
♦Miss Mae Strickler 

Pearl Street Community House, 334 North Pearl Street, Youngstown, Ohio 
Founded: 1925 
Enrollment: 6,402 

Aim: To develop Christian character and citizenship through religious, educational, 
and social activities 
tMiss Phoebe Geyer, Superintendent 
Mrs. Ruth O'Dea, Kindergartner 
Mr. J. Bryant Howard, Boys' Worker 

Rebecca Williams Community House, 1089 Pine Avenue, S.E.. Warren, Ohio 
Founded: 1924 
Enrollment: 650 

Aim: To provide spiritual, mental, and recreational training for the foreign-born 
and Negro people in the steel-mill section 
♦Miss Emily M. Fox, Superintendent 
♦Miss Evelyn Bloomer, Associate Worker 
Mr. Maurice Radclfff. Boys' Director 
Mr. Paul Uhlinger, Assistant Boys' Worker 

NORTH INDIANA- 
KATE BiLDERBACK NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE. 2004 JOHN STREET, FoRT WaVNE. InD. 

Founded: 1921 

Enrollment: 2,321 

Aim : To Christianize, Americanize, and educate a large foreign-speaking group 

Miss Mary Metts, Superintendent 

NORTHWEST INDIANA— 

North Hammond Clinic, Hammond. Ind. 
Founded: 1928 
Enrollment: 250 

Aim: To advise and help mothers with children under six years of age in problems 
of feeding and other situations of life 
Mrs. Louise Fruehling, Superintendent (637 Mulberry Street) 

NORTHWEST IOWA— 

Shesler Deaconess Home, 1308 Nebraska Street, Sioux City, Iowa 
Founded: 1901 
♦Miss Martha Younglove 
♦Miss Ethel Lehn 
Miss Myrtle Beck 

Shesler Hall, 1308 Nebraska Street, Sioux City, Iowa 
Founded: 1924 
Capacity: 30 residents 

Aim: A Christian home for young business women 
Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson. Matron 

Harriet Ballou Day Nursery and Industrial Work of Wall Street Mission, 312 South 
Wall Street, Sioux City, Iowa 
Founded: 1914 
Reaching 288 families 

Aim : To care for babies left for the day by working mothers and to carry on religious 
and educational programs 
Mrs. Leona Austin, Nursery Matron 
♦Miss Ethel Lehn 
♦Miss Martha Younglove 

OHIO— 

Flower Esther Hall, 1324 Superior Street, Toledo, Ohio 

Founded: 1908 
Capacity: 35 residents 
Aim: A Christian home for business girls 
Mrs. J. H. Basden. Superintendent 

♦Deaconess. fEnrolled Missionary. 



54 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Friendly Center, 1334 Superior Street, Toledo, Ohio 

Founded: 1927 

Enrollment: 550 

Aim: To be a good neighbor to a large foreign group of Syrians and Greeks 
Miss Mildred Huber, Girls' Worker 
Mr. Ernest Marks, Boys' Supervisor 
Mr. Philip Robinson. -Athletic Director 

South Side Settlement, 363 Reeb Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 
Founded: 1900 
Enrollment: 1,590 

Aim: To help people achieve a purposeful and happy life through the clubs, classe?, 
and trained Christian leadership 
Mr. William Kaufman, Director 
*Miss Roberta Alexander, Kindergarten, Girls' Gym, Library 
Miss Margaret James. B.S., Home Economics 
Miss Doris Leonard, Family Service 

Miss Eleanor Riley, B.A., Girls' Clubs, Music, Dramatics 
Mr. John F. Dickey, Director of Boys' Work 

McKelvey Deaconess Home, 72 South Washington Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 
Founded: 1900 
*Miss Grace Nettleton, Superintendent 
*Miss Roberta .'\lexander 
Miss Margaret James 
Miss Doris Leonard 
Miss Eleanor Riley, B.A. 

OREGON— 

Methodist Old People's Home, 1625 Center Street, Salem, Ore. 
Founded: 1909 
Capacity: 42 residents 

Aim: A home for worthy, needy people of Oregon over seventy years of age 
Mrs. Beatrice Blatchford, Superintendent 

PACIFIC northwest- 
Japanese Methodist Mission, Spokane, Wash. 
Founded: 1902 
Enrollment: 150 

Aim: To carry on a religious and social program for 350 Japanese people and to be an 
international center in eastern Washington 
Rev. S. Niwa 

^ Tacoma Community House, 1311 South M Street, Tacoma, Wash. 
Founded: 1923 
Enrollment: 812 
\ ^ Aim: To minister to the spiritual, social, and recreational needs of the community 

*Miss M. Blanche Kinison, Superintendent 

*Miss Jennie C. Trumbull. Assistant Superintendent, Women's and Girls' Work 
*Miss Mildred Williams, Kindergarten, Recreation 
Mr. George Chessum, jr., B.A., Boys' Director 

Wilkeson Community House, Wilkeson, Wash. 
Founded: 1923 
Enrollment: 255 

Aim: To uphold Christian standards in this coal-mining section 
Mr. and Mrs. William Haggarty, Superintendents 

PHILADELPHIA- 
PHILADELPHIA Deaco.n'ess Home and Settlement, 611 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Founded: 1898 
Total attendance: 44.747 

Aim: To provide a religious, educational, and recreational program in a Christian 
character-building community center 
♦Miss Rena E. Keiser, Superintendent 
Miss Eleanor Balph, M.D. 
Miss Jessie Bailey, English 
Miss Janet Bohler, R.N., Dispensary 
*Miss Neva Carden, Music 
*Miss Edith Deel, Secretary 
♦Miss Ruth Dowling 
tMiss Leola Greene, Sewing, Club 
tMiss Mary Hanawalt. Social Work 
tMiss Nelle Herbst, Dietitian 
Miss Margaret Milligan, M.D. 
♦Miss Almeda Parsons 
tMiss Edith Roher, Kindergarten 

♦Miss Agnes Strong (162 East Walnut Street, Germantown) 
♦Miss Aubrey Tyree (1838 Wallace Street) 
♦Miss Ethel Weisz, Library, Club Work 

♦Deaconess. tEnrolled Missionary. 






Workers in Conference Projects. 55 

Philadelphia Esther Hall, 2021 Mount Vernon Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Founded: 1926 

Capacity: 15 residents 

Aim: To provide a Christian and homelike atmosphere for young women 
Mrs. A. Poticher, Superintendent 
Miss Maud Hughes, Assistant Superintendent 

Pittsburgh- 
Elizabeth A. Bradley Children's Home, 214 Hulton Road, Oakmont, Pa. 
Founded: 1905 

Capacity: 28 residents 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for Methodist boys and girls 
♦Miss Olive M. Morgan, Superintendent 
*Miss Frances Angell 
*Miss Esther Leach, B.A. 

Louise Home for Babies, 336 South Aiken Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Founded: 1913 
Capacity: 29 residents 
Aim: To give a Christian home to dependent children 

Morals Court of Pittsburgh 

Aim: To follow court cases with careful investigation, give counsel, and help make 
readjustment 
Mrs. Eleanor H. Srodes, Social Worker 

Neighborhood Center, 714 Foreland Street, N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Founded: 1925 

Enrollment: 394 

Aim: To help our people to realize the value of practicing the teachings of Jesus 
*Miss Ruth E. Wheatley (2000 Fifth Avenue) 
tMiss Helen Pabis (2000 Fifth Avenue) 

Pittsburgh Deaconess Home, 2000 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Founded: 1890 
Mrs. Frederick Spielman, Superintendent 
*Miss Carrie N. Dixon, B.S. 
*Miss Ella M. Fieger 

♦Miss Ruth Fuessler (225 W. Fulton Street, Butler. Pa.) 
♦Miss Laura Galliers, B.R.E. 
♦Miss Florence R. Jury 
♦Miss Ora Leigh Kemp 
♦Miss Helen M. Leach, B.R.E. 
tMiss Helen Pabis 
♦Miss Ruth L Pope, B.A. 
♦Miss Dorothy M. Russell 
♦Miss Lena L. Sisco 
♦Miss Lura A. Turner 
♦Miss Ruth E. Wheatley 
♦Miss Mabel J. Whited 

Travelers' Aid, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Co-operative Work) 

ROCK river- 
Esther Hall, 527 Melrose Street, Chicago, III. 
Founded: 1916 
Capacity: 27 residents 

Aim: To provide a Christian home for young business women 
Miss Marietta Eckerman, Superintendent 

First Bohemian Methodist Episcopal Church, 1109 West Nineteenth Place. Chicago, III. 
Founded: 1884 

Enrollment: 500 ^ .. 

Aim: To serve those in need of civic, legal, and spiritual advice; to be a mediator 
between children and foreign-born parents 
Miss Anna Sterba, Church Missionary 

Halsted Street Daily Vacation Bible School, 1935 South Halsted Street. Chicago, III. 
Aim: To teach children representing seventeen diflferent nationalities and eight 
different denominations 

Lincoln Street Institutional Church, South Wolcott Street and Twenty-second Place. 
Chicago. III. 
Founded: 1881 

Membership: 388 / ,^, ■ • , 

.Aim: Home-mission and social-settlement activities in one ot Chicago s most 
densely populated centers of underprivileged people oi twenty-five different 
nationalities 
♦Miss ."Mta L. Wade 



♦Deaconess. tEnrolled Missionary. 



56 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA- 
METHODIST Hospital, 2826 South Hope Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Founded: 1903 

Available beds, 180; bassinets, 40 

Aim: To aid in the promotion of community health; to care for the sick regardless 
of class, color, or creed 

Miss Mary K. West, R.N., Superintendent . 

Miss Millie Christenson, R.N., Secretary and Record Librarian 

Miss Nora Kesling, R.N., Director of Nurses 

Miss Edith Palmer, R.N., Night Supervisor 

Mrs. Emma Rickert, R.N., Operating Room Supervisor 

Mrs. Myrtle Smith, R.N., Obstetrical Floor Supervisor 

Miss Elsie Bachle, R.N., Floor Supervisor 

Miss Agnes Patt, R.N., Floor Supervisor 

Miss Ruth Penney, R.N., Floor Supervisor 

Miss Mary L. Smull, M.S., Dietitian 

Miss Ruth Whitney, R.N., X-ray Technician 

Miss Helen Gaylord, R.N., Physical Therapy Technician 

Church of All Nations 

*Miss Marie Hoge, Kindergarten (603 Gladys Street, Los Angeles) 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS— 

HoLDEN Hospital, C.\rbondale, III. 

Founded: 1916 

Capacity: 50 beds 

Aim: To give Christian, medical, surgical, and nursing care for the sick 

Miss Mattie Boyd Pangburn, R.N., Superintendent 
Miss Jennie A. Johnson, R.N., Nurse Supervisor 
Mrs. Flossie Russell, R.N., Assistant Nurse Supervisor 
Miss Esther Krump, R.N., Surgical Supervisor 
Miss Naomi Hampton, R.N., Night Supervisor 
*Miss Sara Gene Hoffman, Deaconess, Chaplain 

SOUTHWEST KANSAS 

Harriet Campbell Esther Hall, 1002 South Broadway Street, Wichita, Kan. 

Founded: 1923 
Capacity: 20 residents 

Aim: To provide an attractive home and wholesome atmosphere for business and 
working girls 

*Miss Florence Garwood, Superintendent 
Miss Lillie Erdwin, House Supervisor 

Mexican Mission, Lyons, Kan. 

Reaching 100 people 

Aim: To serve the Mexican population in this salt-mining town 

Rev. J. S. Valenzuela, Pastor 

Mexican Mission, Wichita, Kan. 

(Co-operative work with Woman's Department of the Federal Council of Churches) 

Southwest Kansas Conference Deaconess Home, 1002 South Broadway Street, Wichita. 
Kan. 

Founded: 1898 

*Miss Florence Garwood, Superintendent 

*Miss Gladice Bower (Wesley Hospital) 

*Miss Glenice Courter (Associate Pastor, Spivey Parish, Nashville) 

*Miss Clara Dutrow (First Methodist Episcopal Church) 

*Miss Elsie L. Miller, M.A. (Director Religious Education, Wichita Council of Churches, 210 

Elks Bldg.) 
*Miss Kathryn Millsap (Wesley Hospital) 
♦Miss Ruth Sample (Young People's Director, First Methodist Episcopal Church, Hutchinson) 

UPPER IOWA— 

John Huss Methodist Episcopal Church, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Founded: 1914 

Enrollment: Sunday school, 241; church membership, 112 

Rev. V. C. Grant (1320 First Street. S.W.) 
♦Deaconess. 



Workers in Conference Projects. 57 

WEST VIRGINIA— 

Engle Settlement House, 137 Maple Avenue, Fairmont, W. Va. 
Founded: 1922 
Enrollment: 801 

Aim: To do religious educational work in the mining camps of a rural and industria\ 
community 
Miss Rebecca Moddelmog, B.A , Superintendent 
Miss Margaret Moe 

Holloway Deaconess Home, 303 Howard Street, Bridgeport, Ohio 
Founded: 1900 
♦Miss Mary J. Lockhart, Superintendent 
*Miss Rena M. Crawford, Ph.B. 
*Miss Ruth E Holt, B.A. 
♦Miss Nellie M. Schwab 
*Miss Miriam R. Stauffer 
♦Miss Edna M. Stephan 
♦Miss Nellie O. Stevens 
♦Miss Mae Strickler 

Minnie Nay Settlement House, 43 Marshall Street, Benwood, W. Va. 

Founded: 1912 

Enrollment: 359, 8 nationalities 

Aim: To open doors of opportunity for Christian citizens 
♦Miss Sophia Fetzer, Superintendent- 
♦Miss Dorothy Gleason, Kindergartner 

Scott's Run Settleme.vt, R.F.D. No. 7, Box 380, Morgantown, W. Va. 
Founded: 1922 

Aim: To meet the spiritual and educational needs of the people through organiza- 
tions and activities 
Mr. William Russell, B.S., Superintendent 
Mrs. William Russell, Assistant 

Willa Parsons Community House, Clarksburg. W. Va. 

WEST WISCONSIN- 
ITALIAN Mission, 103 South Lake Street, Madison, Wis. 
Founded: 1922 
Enrollment: 525 

Aim: To minister in his name to the physical, mental, social, and spiritual needs of 
the community 
♦Miss Carrie E. Adams (715 Regent Street) 

WILMINGTON- 
MARY Todd Gambrill Neighborhood House, 400 South Heald Street, South Wilmington, 
Del. 
Founded: 1928 
Enrollment: 467 
Aim: Aiding Christian living 
Miss Elizabeth Colton 

Riddle Memorial Deaconess Home, 307 West Sireet, Wilmington, Del. 
Founded: 1914 
Mrs. Agnes Brown, Housemother 
♦Miss Daria Brown 
♦Miss Arabella G. Crothers 
♦Miss Louise Whitsitt 
Miss Elizabeth Colton 

Wyoming- 
Children's Ho.ME of Wyoming Conference, R.F.D. No. 4, Binghamton, N.Y. 

Founded: 1913 

Capacity: 60 residents 

Aim: To give unfortunate children their chance; to serve them willingly, cheerfully 
and well 
Rev. E. H. Lowry, B.A., Superintendent 
Mrs. E. H. Lowry, R.N., Associate Superintendent 
Mrs. Elsie Crawford, House Matron 
Mrs. Mary E. Davis, Special Matron 
Mrs. Mabel McKune, Relief Matron 
Mrs. Dove Wells, Boys' Matron 
Miss Eugenia Gage, Girls' Matron 
Mrs. EHzabeth Tinklepaugh, Nursery Matron 
Miss Ruth Sowden, Assistant Nursery Matron 

♦Deaconess. 



Deaconesses 

IN STATIONS 

*Miss Mary L. Blaschko Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, Kansas City, Mo. 

Residence, Fifteenth Street and Denver Avenue. 

*Miss Cora Cole Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church, 1023 Lyon Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

♦Miss Osta A. Coulter Wayside Community House, 811 E. Tuscarawas, Canton, Ohio 

♦Miss Goldie Cowman, B. A., R.N Alton Memorial Hospital, Alton, 111. 

♦Miss Dorothy Culp, B.A Grace Church, Waterloo, Iowa 

♦Miss Edith M. Curl, Robertson Blvd. Methodist Church, Robertson at Whitworth, Los Angeles, Calif. 

♦Miss Lora Bell Denniston First Methodist Episcopal Church, 11th at Boulder, Tulsa, Okla. 

♦Miss Georgia Derby Bethany Methodist Episcopal Church, Detroit, Mich. 

Residence, 10100 Woodlawn Street, Detroit, Mich. 

*Miss Lucile Estes, B.A Methodist Episcopal Church, Milford, Utah 

♦Miss Mildred Flack Methodist Deaconess Orphanage, Lake Bluff, 111. 

♦Miss Ruth Flaherty Washington Park Methodist Episcopal Church, Providence, R. I. 

♦Mrs. Florence E. Gaither Conference Field Work, Washington, D. C. 

Residence. 401 T Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
♦Miss Jennie M. Gasser Plaza Community Center, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Residence, 3945 West Avenue Forty-three. 
♦Miss Helen M. Graham New York Deaconess Home, New York, N. Y. 

Residence, 1175 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

♦Miss Mae I. Greer Methodist Deaconess Orphanage, Lake Bluff, 111. 

♦Miss Edith Hargrave First Methodist Church, Harlingen, Texas 

♦Miss Mary J. Harrison Michigan Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, Leavenworth, Kan. 

Residence, 703 S. Sixth Street, Leavenworth, Kan. 

♦Miss Mary Hebrew, R.N The Methodist Children's Home, 191 E. Center Street, Berea, Ohio 

♦Miss Sarah B. Heisler. . . .Goodwill Industries of New Jersey, 574 Jersey Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. 

♦Miss Beulah L. Hill Methodist Deaconess Orphanage, Lake Bluff, 111. 

♦Miss Lulu Hiner 1 135 College Avenue, Topeka, Kan. 

♦Miss Mearle R. Hoppock Goodwill Industries, Baltimore, Md. 

Residence, 1713 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, Md. 

♦Miss Janet Howard, B.R.E Box 1444, Great Falls, Mont. 

♦Miss Virginia Hubley Christ Methodist Episcopal Church, New York, N. Y. 

Residence, 1175 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
♦Miss Mame Jericho General Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Residence, 2821 Manitau Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 
♦Miss Mary E. Keniston Broadway Temple, New York, N. Y. 

Residence, 1175 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

♦Miss Violet Larson, B.A Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, Neb. 

♦Miss Madeline Lary, B.S Director of Religious Education, Maine Conference 

Residence, Gorham, N. H. 

♦Miss Beulah I. Magruder, R.N Freeman Hospital, Joplin, Mo. 

♦Miss Nina McCosh Colorado Springs, Colo. 

♦Miss Pearle McKeeman Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, Neb. 

♦Miss Clara A. Mills First Methodist Episcopal Church, Pasadena, Calif. 

Residence, 1439 North Garfield, Pasadena, Calif. 

♦Miss Lena E. Moffet Methodist Episcopal Church, Oelrichs, S. D. 

♦Miss Alice Murdock First Methodist Episcopal Church, Bridgeport, Conn. 

♦Miss Eleanor Nye Hyde Park Community Church, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Residence, 3314 Montieth Avenue, Hyde Park, Cincinnati, Ohio 
♦Miss Laura C. Price First Methodist Episcopal Church, Santa Monica, Calif. 

Residence, 1230 Howard Street, Santa Monica, Calif. 

♦Miss Lillian Pugh Box 103, Waveland, Miss. 

♦Miss Beulah Rayson West Side Methodist Episcopal Church, Great Falls, Mont. 

Residence, Apartment 22, 426 First Avenue, S.W. 
♦Miss Ethel Ristine, B.R.E Westwood Community Church, Santa Monica, Calif. 

Residence, 1333 B. 26th Street, Santa Monica, Cahf. 

♦Miss Ruth Robb, B.A Montana Deaconess School, Helena, Mont. 

♦Miss Lavinia Russell 36 Woodlawn Street, Everett, Mass. 

♦Miss Mary J. Ryan, M.A Good Samaritan Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz. 

♦Miss Bertie Sawtelle, B.R.E Park Boulevard Methodist Episcopal Church, San Diego, Calif. 

Residence, 4445 Mississippi Avenue, San Diego, Calif. 
♦Miss Lucy Senrick First Methodist Episcopal Church, Long Beach, Calif. 

Residence, 634 Cedar Avenue, Long Beach, Calif. 
♦Miss Helen Spessard Methodist Episcopal Church, St. John, Kan. 

Residence, 512 N. Exchange Street, St. John, Kan. 
♦Miss MoUie Stahley Methodist Episcopal Church, Westfield, N. Y. 

Residence, 117 East Main Street, Westfield, N. Y. 
♦Miss Wilma Swartslander Central Methodist Episcopal Church, Spokane, Wash. 

Residence, Methodist Deaconess Hospital. 
♦Miss Mildred E. Sweet, B..\ Wesley Foundation, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Residence, 616 E. Huron Avenue. 

♦Miss Grace Thompson Methodist Deaconess Orphanage, Lake Bluff, 111. 

♦Miss Pearle Tibbetts Grand Avenue Temple, Kansas City, Mo. 

Residence, Fifteenth Street and Denver Avenue. 

♦Deaconess. 

58 



Deaconesses. 59 

♦Miss May W. Trimble The Strawbridge Home for Boys. Sykesville. Md. 

♦Miss Cecile B. Walden First Methodist Episcopal Church, Cortland, N. Y. 

♦Miss Sadie L. Walker First Methodist Episcopal Church, Des Moines, Iowa 

Residence, 700 Gray Street. 

♦Miss Tennie Yoder Methodist Deaconess Orphanage, Lake Bluff, 111. 

♦Miss Esther Young Methodist Episcopal Church, Cowles, Neb. 

Leave of Absence to Attend School 

♦Miss Leila Dickman 110 Sherman Street, Hartford, Conn. 

♦Miss Bessie Estep Bethany Hospital, Kansas City, Kan. 

♦Miss Mae Fullmer Milford, Mich. 

♦Miss Ethel M. Graves 110 Sherman Street, Hartford, Conn. 

♦Miss Beatrice Greene 110 Sherman Street. Hartford. Conn. 

♦Miss Carlotta Henne Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 

♦Miss Ruth Lower Methodist Episcopal Hospital, Great Falls, Mont. 

♦Miss Leah Bell Lyman Turner, Mich. 

♦Miss Golden E. Mills Bethesda Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 

♦Miss Grace Newman Cleveland, Ohio 

♦Miss Maye Parker Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, 111. 

♦Miss Maurine Reager 110 Sherman Street, Hartford, Conn. 

♦Miss Vesta Roberson 110 Sherman Street, Hartford, Conn. 

♦Miss Anna Schautz 35 Temple Street, Boston, Mass. 

Leave of Absence Because of Illness 

♦Miss Willa Mae Brown 404 East Fourth Street, Laurel, Miss. 

♦Miss Mary E. Darling Ilion, N. Y. 

♦Miss Hattie Davis 126 E. Kelso Street. Inglewood, Calif. 

♦Miss Bertha Goodale 1073 Chestnut Street, Kulpmont, Pa. 

♦Miss Elisabeth Hanson 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove. N. J. 

♦Miss Helen Phillips 227 Bellevue Avenue. Trenton. N. J. 

♦Miss Harriet M. Russell 16 Brooklawn Terrace. Bridgeport, Conn. 

♦Miss Flora Taylor Sac City. Iowa 

♦Miss Grace Yoakam R. D. No. 4, Mt, Vernon, Ohio 

Leave of Absence Because of Home Duties 

♦Miss Mary Brownrigg Welda, Kan. 

♦Miss Catherine E. Frey R.D., Lyons. N. Y. 

♦Miss Mabel Hopkinson Roadside Settlement, Des Moines, Iowa 

♦Miss Alta McFerrin Indianola. Iowa 

♦Miss Bertha Moore Monroe, N. Y. 

♦Miss Grace Alice Packer 542 S. Belmont. Wichita. Kan. 

♦Miss Velma L. Pickett 13875 Mitchell Avenue. Detroit. Mich. 

♦Miss Mary Ellen Ritter Route 1 . Olney . III. 

♦Miss Frieda Schmickle Central City. Iowa 

♦Miss Ruth Stow Horseheads. N. Y. 

♦Miss Claribel Wright, B.A., M.A 22 East Ninth Street, Holland, Mich. 

Awaiting Appointment 

♦Miss Agnes Gerken, B.R.E R. No. 1. Republican City. Neb. 

♦Miss Helen Louise Gould Fifteenth Street and Denver Avenue, Kansas City. Mo. 

♦Miss Ella Hayward 1762 27th Avenue, San Francisco. Calif. 

♦Miss Ada Hindman Springville. Iowa 

♦Miss Margaret McDonald R.R. No. 3, Morristown. Tenn. 

♦Miss Alice Nearhood Ethan. S. D. 

♦Miss Lulu M. Patterson 202 East Avenue, Hutchinson, Kan. 

♦Miss Gladys Pautz 74 Cookman .Avenue. Ocean Grove. N. J. 

♦Miss Ary M. Shough Fifteenth Street and Denver Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

♦Miss Rachelle Lucille Stocks R. No. 1. Flat Rock, Ala, 

♦Miss Anna Zenkovich 2414 Shields Avenue, Sioux City, Iowa 

Pension and Retirement Pending 

♦Miss Elizabeth Curry Box 15, Akron, Colo- 

♦Miss Ruby Davis Belleville, Kan- 

♦Miss E. Hilda Evans 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J- 

♦Miss Sara E. Eyler 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J- 

♦Mrs. Lorena Finley 1630 Ogden Street, Denver, Colo- 

♦Miss Edith Gorby R.R. No. 3, Gering, Neb. 

♦Miss Elsie Hartline 104 Bittman Street, Akron, Ohio 

♦Miss Edna Harvey 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Florence H. Hill 439 West Washington Street, Suffolk Va. 

♦Miss Verta Naylor 1427 North Garfield Street, Pasadena. Calif. 

♦Mrs. Carrie E. H. Reynolds 1054 E. Thirty-fifth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

♦Miss Eva Rigg Kirwin, Kan. 

♦Mrs. Rosa Simpson 1418 Solo Street, Houston, Texas 

♦Miss Miriam L. Throckmorton Derby. Iowa 

♦Miss Irene Worrell 603 Villa Avenue, Port Richmond, Staten Island, N. Y. 

♦Deaconess. 



60 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Working Outside 

♦Miss Amy Boobar, B.A Family Welfare Work, St. Paul, Minn. 

♦Miss LeMardred Brushwood 3105 Franklin Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio 

♦Miss Minnie Pabst 1019 Sanford Avenue, Irvington, N. J. 

♦Miss Edith Wilson, M.A Jackson County Parental Home, Kansas City, Mo. 



Retired 

♦Miss Grace G. Adams 615 S. Virgil Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

♦Miss Lucia E. Belding 4 College Street, Poultney. Vt. 

♦Miss Margaret F. Bell 4901 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, D. C. 

♦Miss Addie Benedict Fullerton, Neb. 

♦Mrs. Helen L Benson 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Caroline E. Beyer 5571 Taft Avenue, Oakland, Calif. 

♦Miss Katherine A. Blackburn 150 Sandwich Street, E., Sandwich, Ontario, Canada 

♦Miss Susette Blackman 99 Ross Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

♦Miss Elizabeth Boardman 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Myrtle Chapin R.D. No. 3, Box 67, Oswego, N. Y. 

♦Miss Cedora E. Cheney 379 Thirtieth Street, Oakland, Calif. 

♦Miss Martha J. Collins Trowbridge, Ontario, Canada 

♦Miss Stella Corbin Lookeba, Okla. 

♦Miss Frances A. Cosden Green Haven, Anne Arundel Co., Pasadena, Md. 

♦Miss Irene Cummings 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Mrs. Alice Curtis 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Bertha E. Deen, R.N 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Mary DeGroat In care of I. M. Travis, Blooming Grove, Pa. 

♦Mrs. Helen D. Evans 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Cornelia Farrington 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Amanda Ford 3132 Chesley Avenue, Hamilton, Baltimore, Md. 

♦Miss Priscilla W. Foster 601 Laurel Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 

♦Miss Mollie M. Freedeman 512 S. Wooster Avenue, Strasburg, Ohio 

♦Miss Margaret Fries 829 Loma Drive, Hermosa Beach, Calif. 

♦Miss Alice M. Fulton 249 Edith Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

♦Miss Emmeline Garrett 1425 N. Garfield Avenue, Pasadena, Calif. 

♦Miss Sarah Ellen Greenhalgh 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Mrs. Ella C. Hartshorn 275 Robincroft Drive, Pasadena, Calif. 

♦Miss Octavia Hicks Thompson Rest Home, Mountain Lake Park, Md. 

♦Miss Harriet E. Hiles 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Mrs. C. W. Horton 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Jennie L. Johnson 140 Bassett Street, New Britain, Conn. 

♦Miss Mary E. Johnston 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Emily K. Judd 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Mary A. Knapp 74 Cookman .'\venue. Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Albertina Kullenberg 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Dorothy Leavitt 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Capitola Leohner 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Geneva McCrory 518 E. View Drive, Los Angeles, Calif. 

♦Miss Lida C. Manning 275 Robincroft Drive, Pasadena, Calif. 

♦Miss Rebecca Mewshaw 1458 Columbia Road, N.W., Washington, D. C. 

♦Miss Martha Morgan 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Laura Morris, M.A 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Lulu R. Morse 1114 Lipan Street, Denver, Colo. 

♦Miss Susie Morton Spirit Lake, Iowa 

♦Miss Martha Neese 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Gertrude O'Rear 115 W. Second Street, Newton, Kan. 

♦Miss Kirstine M. Petersen 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Jessie A. Pratt 236 N. Eastlake Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

♦Miss Mathilda Reeves 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Emma Ridler 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Rosa Santee 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Sadie J. ShefTer 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Melda Sherman Wickliffe, Ohio 

♦Miss Bertha Lenora Smith 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Demis E. Smith 115 N. Almansor Street, Alhambra, Calif. 

♦Miss Cartes K. Swartz 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Elva Wade 74 Cookman .'\ venue. Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Rebecca Weigle 264 Robinson Road, Pasadena, Calif. 

♦Mrs. Lillian H. Welday 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Kathleen Weybrew 380 N. Fifth Street, San Jose, Calif. 

♦Miss Daisy Whipple Locust Villa, Lititz, Pa. 

♦Miss Mary E. Whitehead, R.N 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss S. Erminie Wilber 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Claribel Winchester 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

♦Miss Cynthia Wrikeman Kilgore, Ohio 

♦Deaconess. 



Missionaries. 61 

Retired Workers and On Leave of 
Absence 

Miss S. E. Abbott Box 1 13. Falls Church, Va. 

Miss M. Rebecca Barbour 12 College Avenue, Oxford, Ohio 

Miss Louisa A. Bell 576 E. Thirty-third Street, Paterson, N. J. 

Miss Florence Bower Welsh, La. 

Miss Francina Bryant 416 W. Jefferson Street, Orlando, Fla. 

Miss Elizabeth Condy Route 3, Claremont, Ontario, Canada 

Miss Mary Belle Evans Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Miss Harriet Fink Nottingham Primary, Boaz, Ala. 

Mrs. Emma W. Fisher 3719 Edenhurst Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Miss Ruth Forsberg 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Miss Bertha Fowler 3134 S. Logan Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Anna B. Gowell Misenheimer, N. C. 

Rev. A. E. Griffith 1335 Fortieth Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

Miss Marjorie Hanton Box 28, White Haven, Pa. 

fMiss Frances Harms (Awaiting Appointment) Wellington, Kan. 

Miss Eva Hicks 2005 Thirty-sixth Avenue, W., Seattle, Wash . 

Miss Rachel Irwin 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Miss Clara Jakes Route 1, Lafayette, Ind. 

Miss Erma Jenkins 833 Seventh Street, Portsmouth, Ohio 

Miss Louella Johnson 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Miss Ida L. Kahlo 275 Robincroft Drive, Pasadena, Calif. 

Miss Mabel Keech Centreville. Mich. 

Mrs. M. G. Lawrence 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Mrs. Carolyn Lomison 275 Robincroft Drive, Pasadena, Calif. 

Miss Oma McCumber New Berlin, 111. 

Miss Jennie Mathias 1605 N. Mariposa Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Miss Cozy Miller 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N.J. 

Mrs. Ada Murphy 137-41 172d Street, Springfield Gardens, Long Island, N. Y. 

Miss Edith Orvis 521 Warren Street, Berwick, Pa. 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Pendergrass 917 Forest Avenue, North Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Miss Cecilia Sheppard 2103 W. Fayette Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Miss .\nna Sipek In care of Mrs. Spurgeon, 184 Morgantown Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Miss Marjorie Louise Smith 422 W. Broadway, Anaheim, Calif. 

Miss Olive L. Smith Paradise, Calif. 

Miss M.J. Tripp 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Mrs. S. A. Winold 74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, N. J. 

Mrs. May L. Woodruff 71 Mt. Tabor Way, Ocean Grove, N. J. 



Special Workers— 1938-39 

Graduates of the National Training School of The Woman's Home Missionary Society in the 
past three years who are serving under the church. Credentials have been received, but they are not 
serving as missionaries or deaconesses. 

N.\ME Position Address 

Ester McGaughey. '38 Pastor's Assistant Lexington, Nebraska 

Doris Miller, '38 Young People's Worker, Seymour Care of Dr. Sumner L. Martin, 

District, Indiana Conference 227 Calvin Blvd., Seymour, Ind. 



tEnrolled Missionary. 



Minutes of the Board of Managers 



INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 
October 12-18, 1938 



'T'HE fifty-seventh Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers of The 

Woman's Home Missioiiary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
assembled at 9.45 Wednesday morning, October 12, 1938, in the Roberts 
Park Methodist Episcopal Church, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Following the oi^gan prelude, "Laus Deo,'' (Dubois) by Mrs. C. C. Mc- 
Mutrey, Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, national President, opened the convention. 
The opening hymn, "God of Grace and God of Glory," was followed by a 
worship service led by Dr. E. E. Aldrich, pastor of Roberts Park Church. 

Mrs. F. Howard Ake, chairman of the Committee on Credentials, re- 
ported that from 82 conferences, 277 delegates were entitled to vote. 

Mrs. P. E. Powell, chairman of Registration, reported a registration of 
42 missionaries and deaconesses, 175 conference delegates, 18 national offi- 
cers, 24 bureau secretaries, 18 Trustees, and 500 visitors, with more wait- 
ing to be registered. 

Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver, national Recording Secretary, organized the 
convention. 

In the roll call of officials, the following were absent: Mrs. M. L. 
Robinson, Third Vice-President; Mrs. B. M. Hochswender, Mrs. Edward A. 
Martin, Mrs. G. Bromley Oxnam, and Mrs. Henry Pfeift'er, of the Board 
of Trustees; Mrs. C. C. Travis and Mrs. B. W. Meeks, Bureau Secretaries. 

The roll call of the conferences showed 199 delegates and more than 
150 visitors present in the room at the opening of the convention. 

The convention voted unanimously to send greetings to the absent mem- 
bers of the official family. 

By authorization of the Board of Trustees, the Recording Secretary 
will use the report of the proceedings in the "Annual Meeting Daily'' as 
the basis of the official minutes of the Board of Managers, with the fol- 
lowing assistants to edit them: Mrs. H. R. Clarke, Mrs. H. F. Clark, Mrs. 
A. G. Hoovens, Mrs. M. A. Stewart, Mrs. H. F. Young. 

Mrs. H. F. Gilmour, Nebraska Conference, chairman of tellers, an- 
nounced the names of tellers: Mrs. H. R. Shanberger, Erie Conference; 
Mrs. R. F. Tyler, Idaho Conference; Mrs. A. C. Kaufman, Northern Min- 
nesota Conference; Mrs. D. P. Moore, Southern Illinois Conference; Mrs. 
F. J. Raymond, Detroit Conference; Mrs. L. F. Freeland, local chairman; 
Mrs. Ross Beem, Mrs. W. S. Ennes, Mrs. John Goetz, Mrs. George Morris, 
Mrs. D. H. Richards, Mrs. S. D. Robinson, Miss Eloise Palmer, Mrs. F. G. 
Johns, Mrs. Royer Brown, Mrs. Clara Nelson, Mrs. C. P. Shulhafer. Mrs. 
Gilmour announced that the first ballot would be I'eceived at the opening 
of the afternoon session, and gave general directions for balloting. • 

Mrs. J. H. Smiley, general chairman, introduced the local committee. 

Miss Muriel Day, secretary of Education and Personnel, introduced the 
missionaries present as follows: 

Helen Edick, superintendent of Italian Settlement, Utica, New York; 
C. C. Brooks, superintendent of Navajo Indian Mission, Farmington, New 
Mexico; Wayne Leitch, boys' worker at Walker Neighborhood House, Olive 
Hill, Kentucky; Gilbert W. Collins, superintendent of Campbell Settlement, 
Gary, Indiana; Mrs. Geo. S. Boase, boys' matron, and Geo. S. Boase, science 
teacher, Wilmer H. Tolle, physical education and science teacher, Pfeiffer 

62 



Minutes. 63 

Junior College, Misenheimer, North Carolina; Mrs. A. M. Krahl, assistant 
superintendent, Yuma Indian Mission, Yuma, Arizona; Myrtle Thompson, 
nursery school supervisor. Mothers' Memorial Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
Mrs. J. H. Schlapbach, assistant superintendent, Potawatomi Indian Mis- 
sion, Mayetta, Kansas; Helen Meredith, girls' matron. Mothers' Jewels 
Home, York, Nebraska; Constance Arnold, Woman's Department Gammon 
Theological Seminary, Atlanta, Georgia; Esther Claus, Epworth School, 
Webster Groves, Missouri; Eda Jacobson, children's and adult worker, and 
Annie Golley, Marcy Center, Chicago, Illinois; Maurine Paas, director of 
Alma Mathews House, New York City; Catherine L. Perry, superintendent 
of Medical Mission Dispensary, Boston, Massachusetts; Mrs. E. T. Hilkert, 
Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, Ocean Grove, New Jersey; Carmen Lowry, 
superintendent of Allen School, Asheville, North Carolina; Lillie R. Sheffer, 
superintendent, Emma Vanek, housemother. East St. Louis Settlement, 
East St. Louis, Illinois; Mrs. Margaret Davis Bowen, principal, Gilbert 
Academy, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mary Metts, superintendent, Kate Bil- 
derback Neighborhood House, Fort Wayne, Indiana; Louise Gold- 
smith, kindergartner, Leisenring No. 3, Dunbar, Pennsylvania; Ethel Van 
Duren, kindergartner, McCrum Community House, Uniontown, Pennsyl- 
vania; Ethel Harps t, superintendent, Ethel Harpst Home, Cedartown, 
Georgia. 

Miss Grace Steiner, secretary of the Deaconess Department, introduced 
the following deaconesses: 

Eunice Britt, field representative. The National Training School, Kan- 
sas City, Missouri; Nelle Wright, religious education director in Utah; 
Vera C. Nicklas, Indiana Conference Deaconess Home; Mabel J. Whited, 
Pittsburgh Deaconess Home; Rena E. Keiser, superintendent, Philadel- 
phia Deaconess Home; Irene S. Duncan, city Bible teacher, Mae Ledger- 
wood, housemother, Indianapolis Deaconess Home; Sara Gene Hoffman, 
Holden Hospital, Carbondale, Illinois; Ruth I. Pope, Deaconess-at-large, 
Pittsburgh Conference; Mrs. Minnie Gorrell, superintendent, Methodist 
Sanatorium, Albuquerque, New Mexico; Ella Hay ward, superintendent, 
Swartzell Methodist Home for Children, Washington. D. C; Emma Spiel- 
man, superintendent, Carrie Dixon, field worker, Pittsburgh Deaconess 
Home; Dr. Anna Neiderheiser, president. The National Training School; 
Esther Leach, Elizabeth Bradley Children's Home, Oakmont, Pennsyl- 
vania; Ruth Ferguson, Mexican Border Work, Calexico. California; Marie 
Newell and Grace Arnold, Pavillion Project, Riverton, Wyoming; Mary E. 
Shoemaker, Forest Glen Community House, Battle Creek, Michigan; Grace 
Thompson, Methodist Deaconess Orphanage, Lake Bluff, Illinois; Julia A. 
Lakey, Guernsey Valley Parish, Cambridge, Ohio; Mildred Hewes. pastor, 
Kalamazoo, Michigan; Mary L. Lockhart, superintendent, and Nellie 0. 
Stevens, Holloway Deaconess Home, Bridgeport, Ohio; Edna Muir, parish 
worker, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Mrs. Cline and Mrs. Dennis, former bureau secretaries, were next pre- 
sented to the convention and seated with the bureau secretaries. 

Miss Ethel Harpst and Miss Victoria Perry brought the triplets of 
Harpst Home (Isaac, Rebecca, and Rachel) to the platform. 

Mrs. Daniel Stecker presented the Program of the convention and 
moved that it be made the official program. It was so accepted. The 
theme of the program: "To Serve the Present Age." 

After singing of "I Know Not What the Future Holds," the President, 
Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, gave her address. 

Mrs. M. C. Slutes conducted the memorial service for friends, national 
officers, deaconesses, missionaries, and confei'ence and district officers. 
She was assisted by the pages, gowned in white satin capes, who placed 
on the altar a large basket of lilies. Mrs. Rodeheaver read the names 
of those memorialized as the audience stood. The sei-vice closed with the 
singing of McAfee's "The Heart of God," sung by Mrs. R. E. Higgs. 

Dr. E, E. Aldrich pronounced the benediction. 



64 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Wednesday Afternoon, October 12, 1938 

HPHE session opened at 1.45 o'clock with the President presiding. Mrs. 

John Kolmer played an organ prelude, "Vesper Bello," following with 
hymn 287, "A Charge to Keep I Have," was sung. 

Prayer was led by Mrs. W. R. Fruit, of Detroit, Michigan. 

Dr. N. F. Forsyth, Secretary of Religious Education in the Local Church, 
Board of Education, was then presented by the President, and spoke on 
leadership education. 

The Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. V. F. DeVinny, prefaced her report 
by asking the audience to sing hymn No. 402, "And Are We Yet Alive?" 

Mrs. Merle N. English then spoke on the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

The chairman of tellers brought the returns of the first ballot and the 
four general officers for 1938-39 were introduced: President, Mrs. W. H. C. 
Goode; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. V. F. DeVinny; Recording Secre- 
tary, Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver; Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Freeman. 

Mrs. Mildred A. Knight, secretary of Young People's Department, gave 
her report, challenging the women to find leaders for the young people, 
referring to God's command to Moses to "call Joshua." 

A ladies' trio from Princeton, Indiana — Mrs. Sanford Trippet, Mrs. 
T. M. McDonald, Mrs. Louis Rothschild, Jr., sang two numbers, accompanied 
by Miss Jessie Jeffrey: "How Beautiful Upon the Mountains" and "Open 
Our Eyes." 

Dr. E. E. Aldrich pronounced the benediction. 

The afternoon closed with sectional conferences of the following groups: 
Bureau Secretaries, Presidents, Corresponding Secretaries, Treasurers, 
Wesleyan Service Guilds, Young People, Juniors, Spiritual Life Leaders, 
Christian Citizenship, Supplies. 



Wednesday Evening, October 12, 1938 

TPhE Fellowship Banquet was held on Wednesday evening, October 12, 

at 6.30 o'clock in the Riley Room of the Hotel Claypool. Flowers and 
flags added to the charm of the room, the walls of which were inscribed 
with famous sayings of the poet Riley. 

Mrs. J. H. Smiley, general chairman of the convention, presided. 

Bishop Edgar Blake, of the Detroit Area, offered the invocation. 

Mrs. Jane Johnson Burroughs, of the Burroughs School of Music, ac- 
companied by Mrs. Arthur Monninger, sang a group of songs: "I Heard 
a Forest Praying," by DeRose and "Joy," by Wintter Watts. Later she 
sang "Visi D'Arte," from the opera Faust, by Puccini. 

Greetings were brought from the Detroit Area by Mrs. Edgar Blake, 
Detroit, Michigan; from the Indiana Conference by the president of the 
conference, Mrs. E. L. Hutchens, Indianapolis; from the ministerial as- 
sociation by Dr. W. C. Hartinger, superintendent of Indianapolis District. 

The response was given by Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, national President, 
who introduced fraternal visitors, the official group, missionaries, and 
deaconesses. 

How the work of The Woman's Home Missionary Society is carried 
on was told by the following: 

Through Publicity — Miss Ruth Esther Wheaton, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Summer Schools — Mrs. Dan Brummitt, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Promotional Secretaries — Miss Helen L. Johnson, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania; Mary Holman, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Missionaries — Miss Mina Klayman, Chicago, Illinois. 

Deaconesses — Miss Ruth Pope, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

The sextette from Rust College, Holly Springs, Mississippi, sang "I'm 
Trampin' Trying to Make Heaven My Home" and "I've Got Good Reli- 
gion Down in My Heart." 

In closing the large group sang "America the Beautiful," led by Mrs. 
J. N. Greene. 



Minutes. 65 

Thursday Morning, October 13, 1938 

jyj ORNING WATCH was held at 8.30 o'clock in the auditorium with Mrs. 
W. E. Longstreth, national chairman of Spiritual Life, in charge. 
She was assisted by Miss Sara Estelle Haskin, of the Women's Missionary 
Council of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The theme for the 
worship services was "Finding Unity With God," and the meditations were 
directed by Miss Haskin. 

Immediately following the morning watch, the classes assembled in 
their assigned rooms with the following subjects and leaders: "The Amer- 
ican City and Its Church," Mrs. D. B. Brummitt; "City Shadows," Mrs. 
E. R. Bartlett; "Street Corner," Mrs. W. M. Hubbard; "Leadership Educa- 
tion Course," Mrs. Coi'a Downs Stevens. 

The convention reassembled at 10.30. After singing the hymn, "The 
Church's One Foundation," the assembly listened to an address on "Home 
Missionary Fields," by Dr. E. D. Kohlstedt, secretary of the Board of 
Home Missions and Chui'ch Extension. 

Mrs. William Elliott, wife of the treasurer of the Board of Home Mis- 
sions, was then presented. 

The chaii'man of tellers, Mrs. H. F. Gilmour, reported the election of 
Mrs. W. Raymond Brown as First Vice-President. 

The chairman of Courtesies, Mrs. E. L. Hutchens, then introduced 
Bishop and Mrs. Edgar Blake and also Mrs. J. H. Slutes, seci-etary of 
stewardship for the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 

The President introduced Mr. Lane Stephens, the auditor, who spoke 
briefly but emphatically of the sound financial condition of the Society and 
stated that the annuity contracts were sounder than ever before because 
they are backed by sound securities, the result of wise procedure on the 
part of our Treasurer in recent years. 

Following the auditor, the national Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Freeman, gave 
her annual report. 

Continuing the subject of "Meeting the Need With Funds," Mrs. Austin 
L. Prynn, secretary of the Junior Department, brought her report assisted 
by Mrs. Charles Smith, bureau secretary and the conference Junior sec- 
retaries. 

The results of the Treasure Hunt were given by secretaries who opened 
miniature treasure chests, telling what "treasure" each held. They were 
then presented to the national President. 

Appreciation for Junior Neighbors and the splendid work of Miss Bertha 
M. Stephenson, editor of Junior Publications, was expressed. 

The noontide message was brought by Dr. Rollin H. Walker, who pro- 
nounced the benediction at the close of the session. 



Thursday Afternoon, October 13, 1938 

TTiHE afternoon session opened at 1.45 o'clock with an organ prelude, 

"Prelude and Fugue" (Handel) played by Mrs. Bernice Fee Mozingo. 
"Break Thou the Bread of Life," hymn 387, was sung, followed by prayer 
by Mrs. Edgar Blake, of Detroit, Michigan. 

Mrs. I. D. Jones was then presented to the audience by the President. 

The financial report of the Young People's Department was given by 
Mrs. Harry Hamilton, bureau secretary. 

The chairman of tellers announced the election of Mrs. Daniel Stecker 
as Second Vice-President. ^ ,r tdt 

The report of the Supply Department was given by Mrs. O. V. Moon. 

The Rust College Sextette rendered two numbers: "Study War No 
More" and "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." 

Mrs. Raymond S. Meek, bureau secretary of Puerto Rico and New York, 
was presented, and spoke on needs of the Dominican Republic after which 
she presented Miss Paas, superintendent, who gave a description of life 
at Alma Matthews House in New York City. 



66 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Mrs. Frank B. Carter, bureau secretary for Alaska and the Northwest, 
told of the hospital at Nome, Jesse Lee Home, and the Seward General Hos- 
pital, Catherine Blaine Home, and Helen Kelly Manley Community Center, 
Portland, Oregon. She then presented Miss Annie Golley, a product of 
Jesse Lee Home and of the National Training School, Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, who is now working at Marcy Center. 

Mrs. A. G. Scudder, bureau secretary for California and Hawaii, told 
of the program carried on in the institutions of her bureau and pre- 
sented iVliss Ruth Ferguson who told of her experiences on the Mexican 
border. 

Mrs. Wilmot Smith told of the work at LaVerne, California, in the 
David and Mai'garet Children's Home and San Diego Esther Hall, two 
institutions which have been handed over to the national Society by the 
Southern California Conference. 

Rev. P. Gordon Gould, who was raised in Jesse Lee Home, gave the 
story of his life and his evaluation of the Home today. 

Dr. Merle N. English was presented and spoke on the tragedy of the 
situation in China. 

The following resolution was presented by the Recording Secretary: 

"The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church in its annual meeting at Indianapolis, Indiana, October 13, 1938, 
having heard Dr. Merle N. English present the situation in China and the 
need of relief for its millions of people who suffer for the necessities of 
life — food, clothing, shelter, and medical attention as a result of present 
war in China, wish to express to the women of Methodism 

1. Our deep concern for the suffering millions in China. 

2. Our desire as Christian women to co-operate in every way pos- 
sible with the Church Committee for China Relief in the enlistment of 
prayers and gifts in this important Christian service." 

It was moved and carried that this resolution be adopted. 
Greetings from Mrs. David Jones were read. 

The Rust College Sextette sang "Lord I Want to Be a Christian," after 
which Rev. P. Gordon Gould pronounced the benediction. 

Thursday Evening, October 13, 1938 

T'^HE session was called to order at 7.45 with an organ prelude, "Bells 

Through the Trees" and "Mountain Sketches," played by Miss Lucile 
Pritchard. 

The worship service was led by Dr. Joseph N. Greene, Indianapolis, 
opening with hymn 286, "Fight the Good Fight." The Scripture lesson 
was from The Acts 20. 

The President presented Dr. Hartinger, district superintendent, who 
presented Rabbi Charry, who made a strong appeal for the Jews of 
Europe. 

Upon vote of approval by the audience, the following telegram was 
sent to the President of the United States: "The Board of Managers of 
The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in session in Roberts Park Methodist Episcopal Church, In- 
dianapolis, Indiana, deeply concerned over the rumored proposed action 
of the English government in closing Palestine to Jewish immigration 
urges you to send an earnest protest against such rumored proposed 
action Stop Voted by an audience of 1,200." Signed, Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, 
President; Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver, Recording Secretary. 

Greetings from Mrs. M. L. Robinson were read. 

Miss Jeanette Roberts and Miss Elizabeth Valentine from Arthur 
Jones Conservatory of Music played two numbers on the harp and violin. 

The chairman of tellers was recognized and reported the election of 
Mrs. M. L. Robinson as Third Vice-President. 

Mrs. Goode presented Miss Ada Townsend. chairman of Citizenship 
Committee, who in turn presented Dr. Murray H. Leiffer, of Garrett Bib- 
lical Institute, who gave an address on "Mission Fields in a Growing 
City." - -^ 



Minutes. 67 

The sextette from Rust College sang "Crucifixion." Miss Ethel Harpst 
asked the blessing on the offering. 

Miss Townsend reviewed the development of her committee which now 
embraces six divisions, each under the supervision of a "specialist" in that 
field. 

She introduced Dr. Mary Ross Potter, of her committee, who spoke 
on alcohol education. 

Mrs. Joy Elmer Morgan, of Washington, D. C, spoke on the movies 
and radio. 

The Rust College Male Quartet sang "Mammy's Little Baby Boy." 

Dr. Joseph Greene pronounced the benediction. 

Friday Morning, October 14, 1938 

A T 8.30 the morning watch was in charge of Mrs. W. E. Longstreth and 

Miss Sara Estelle Haskin, who used "Finding Unity Through Human 
Brotherhood," as the theme for meditation. 

Following the study classes the women reassembled in the auditorium. 
"Lead on King Eternal," was the opening hymn. 

Mrs. Rodeheaver stated that Mrs. H. F. Clark, of Wyoming Conference, 
was called home by the death of her mother. A message of sympathy was 
voted. Mrs. Veenboer was appointed to fill Mrs. Clark's place on the com- 
mittee assisting the Secretary. 

It was moved that the following message be sent to radio station 
WFBM from this body: "The officials and staff of radio station WFBM 
have been so generous in giving time to our Society during our stay in 
Indianapolis that we wish to express to them our deep appreciation of 
this generous gift." 

Mrs. Keen, publisher, announced that there were to be no copies of 
the "Annual Meeting Daily" in the study course this year. 

Mrs. Merle N. English gave her report as secretary of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild. 

The secretary of Christian Citizenship, Miss Ada Townsend, presented 
her statistical report, mimeographed copies of which were distributed to 
the audience. 

Mrs. Wilbur Longstreth, chairman of the Committee on Spiritual Life, 
gave her report; 

The election of Mrs. Dan B. Brummitt as Fourth Vice-President was 
announced. 

Miss Laura May Robinson, bureau secretary for Mexican and the 
Southwest, gave the report of her bureau and introduced Mrs. Minnie G. 
Gorrell, of the Methodist Sanatorium, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, who 
told of the work of the Sanatorium. 

Mrs. L. E. Hoover, bureau secretary of Indian Work reported on her 
bureau and presented Mrs. A. M. Krahl, of the Yuma Indian Mission, who 
spoke of her work among the Yumas. 

Mrs. Frank E. Day, bureau secretary of City Missions, West, told of 
*the work in her bureau. 

Dr. W. C. Hartinger gave the noontide message and pronounced the 
benediction. 

Friday Afternoon, October 14, 1938 

IVfRS. J. RUSSELL PAXTON played for the organ prelude, "Sonata 
in C Minor," by Guilmant. following which the hymn, "In Christ 
There Is No East or West," was sung. 

Dr. M. S. Davage led the opening prayer. 
:• Miss Nelle Wright, conference education director in Utah, spoke of her 
work. 

The President then introduced Mrs. J. W. DoAvns, Secretary of Home 
Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, who gave an ad- 
dress on "Methodist Women at Work." 

The chairman of tellers announced that Mrs. Anna Kresge was elected 
Fifth Vice-President. 



68 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Miss Bettie S. Brittingham, Executive Secretary, Methodist Protestant 
Church, gave an address on "Methodist Women at Work." 

Dr. M. J. Holmes, Secretary for Negro schools of the Board of Educa- 
tion and Miss Grace Demetriades, chairman of World Friendship of the 
"National Council of Methodist Youth" were introduced, and spoke briefly. 

In the absence of Mrs. C. C. Travis, bureau secretary City Missions, 
Central, her report was read by the Recording Secretary. 

Mr. Gilbert W. Collins, superintendent of Campbell Settlement, Gary, 
Indiana, brought a message from his work and the other projects in this 
division of the city work. 

Mrs. C. A. McPheeters, accompanied by Mrs. W. E. Duthrie, sang 
"Light," by John Prindle Scott. 

Mrs. Frank L. Davis, bureau secretary of City Work, Central West, 
continued the discussion on "Localizing Needs" and told of the conditions 
at Mothers' Jewel Home and Epworth School, announcing the recent mar- 
riage of Miss Virginia Cutler, director. Miss Alva Lee Perry is the new 
director. 

Mrs. Davis stressed the need for the new building at East St. Louis 
Settlement and introduced Miss Helen Meredith, case worker at Mothers' 
Jewel Home who brought stories of the work and children there. 

The audience sang a verse of "Above the Hills the Cross of Time is 
Gleaming." 

Dr. Flemmie Kittrell, dean of students at Bennett College, who had 
chaperoned the Bennett choir to Indianapolis, was introduced. 

Mrs. Anna L. Zook, bureau secretary for ten pieces of our Negro work, 
continued the thought of "Localizing Needs" by telling of conditions, 
problems, and opportunities at Peck Hall and Gilbert Academy, Italian 
Kindergarten and Faith Kindergarten, Sager-Brown Home, Boylan-Haven 
School, Allen Home and High School, Browning Home, Eliza Dee Hall, 
E. L. Rust Hall, and Thayer Hall. 

Miss Elfleda Myser, superintendent at Rust Hall, spoke briefly on 
campus life at Rust College. 

Miss Constance Arnold, of Gammon Theological Institute, told of her 
classes in religious education at Gammon and Clark. 

Mrs. Gilmour, chairman of tellers, announced election of the following 
members of the Board of Trustees: Mrs. J. Howard Ake, Mrs. H. C. Black, 
Mrs. C. P. Colegrove, Mrs. David D. Forsyth, Mrs. B. M. Hochswender, 
Mrs. Adelaide Hudd, Mrs. Franklin F. Lewis, Miss Hannah P. Miller, Mrs. 
G. Bromley Oxnam, Mrs. Henry PfeifFer, Mrs. F. C. Reynolds, Mrs. M. C. 
Slutes, and Mrs. Foss Zartman. Mrs. Edward Martin had requested that 
her name be not used. 

Another verse of "Above the Hills the Cross of Time is Gleaming," 
was sung by the audience, and Bishop Edgar Blake pronounced the 
benediction. 

Friday evening at dinner time a banquet for the Young Peoples' De- 
partment and Student Department was held at Central Avenue Methodist 
Episcopal Church with Dr. H. D. Bollinger, Secretary of Wesley Founda- 
tions, Board of Education, as the main speaker. 

Friday Evening, October 14, 1938 

A MUSICAL program of organ, cello, and violin numbers, conducted by 
Dr. Van Denham Thompson, director of the DePauw University choir, 
opened the evening session. 

Dr. E. L. Hutchens led the worship service beginning with the hymn 
"Are Ye Able?" and using portions of the twelfth chapter of Luke for 
his text. 

Bishop Charles W. Flint, of the Atlanta Area, gave an address on "To 
Serve the Present Age." 

Following the offertory the Rust College sextette sang and Bishop 
Blake pronounced the benediction. 



Minutes. 69 

Saturday Morning, October 15, 1938 

THiHE morning watch was held at 8.30, with Miss Sara Estelle Haskin 
;and Mrs. W. E. Longstreth leading the service. The meditation was on 
"Church Unity." 

After the classes, the audience assembled in the auditorium and sang 
"Fling Out the Banner." 

Dr. D. B. Brummitt, editor of the Christian Advocate (Central and 
Northwestern editions) gave an address on "The Process of Unification." 

Two baskets of flowers, one from Northwest Indiana Conference and 
one from North Indiana Conference, were presented and placed on the 
platform. 

Mrs. H. D. Dennis, former bureau secretary, who was celebrating her 
eighty-eighth birthday, was presented. 

Dr. M. S. Davage, of Clark University, gave an address on "A New 
Clark University," and spoke of the proposed move from the present 
campus to another site in Atlanta, where Clark will join with several 
other colleges in a co-operative educational program. 

Dr. M. J. Holmes, Secretary for Negro Schools of the Board of Educa- 
tion, spoke on "Lifting the Level of Life for Those Below the Average." 

Mrs. Myron S. Collins, secretary of Student Work, was introduced and 
in turn presented Mrs. Josephine Froid, from Ball State Teachers' Col- 
lege, at Muncie, Indiana, who spoke of some phases of student thinking 
and what the Wesley Foundations are doing to shape it. Miss Mona J. 
Wilson, student at Indiana University, told about the activities of Kappa 
Phi. 

Miss Myrtle Thompson, of Mothers' Memorial Center, Cincinnati, told 
stories about Negro work in Cincinnati. 

Members of the Wesleyan Service Guild Central Committee were pre- 
sented and greeted by the assembly. 

Mrs. Gilmour, chairman of tellers, reported that the ballot for the four- 
teenth Trustee had resulted in no election. Delegates were instructed to 
prepare another ballot. 

Miss Nola D. Yoder, deaconess at the Glenburn-Van Hook Home Mis- 
sion, at Linton, Indiana, was introduced. 

Dr. 0. W. Fifer, editor of Christian Advocate, (Cincinnati edition), 
brought a noontide message from the 113th Psalm and made the closing 

prayer. 

******* 

The Saturday afternoon Auto View (ought to view) ride to points of 
interest ended at the Nurses' Home of the Methodist Hospital, where tea 
was served by Mrs. Edgar Blake, Mrs. E. L. Hutchens, and Mrs. 0. W. 
Fifer. 



Saturday Evening, October 15, 1938 

TJeV. E, E. ALDRICH gave the call to worship. 

Miss Lucile Pritchard played the following numbers on the organ: 
"Dreams," by McAmis; "Kamennoi-Ostrow," by Rubenstein; and "Sunset 
and Evening Bell," by Federlin. 

Dr. Chester McPheeters led the service of worship. 

The chairman of tellers announced the election of Mrs. W. H. Veenboer, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, as the fourteenth Trustee. 

The Bennett College choir, Gi-eensboro, North Carolina, under the 
direction of Dr. R. Nathaniel Dett, gave a concert of vocal and instru- 
mental numbers, following which Dr. McPheeters pronounced the bene- 
diction. 



70 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Sunday Morning, October 16, 1938 

At 7.30 A. M. the Wesleyan Service Guild members and friends gath- 
ered at the Business and Professional Women's Club for breakfast. 

The members of the Central Committee were introduced. Miss Brit- 
tingham, of the Methodist Protestant Church; and Miss Lora Lee Peter- 
son, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, spoke briefly. 

At 9.30 A. M., at Roberts Park Church, Holy Communion was s6rved. 

This was followed by the consecration of the following deaconesses: 

Mabel Whited and Esther Leach, of Pittsburgh Conference; Doris De- 
Vore, Detroit Conference; and Sara Gene Hoffman, Southern Illinois. 

The Commission service of the following missionaries was then held: 
Esther Claus, Epworth School; Ethel Van Duren, McCrum Community 
House; Frieda Gipson, Wood Junior College. These services were in 
charge of Bishop Edgar Blake. 

The convention guests joined in the regular morning service of the 
church when Bishop Blake preached the sermon, using as Scripture reading, 
Luke 24. 36-53. 



Sunday Afternoon, October 16, 1938 

At 2.30 p. M. a procession of 500 white-robed children singing "Love 
Divine," opened the Junior Hour. Mrs. Austin Prynn, secretary of 
the Junior Department, presided. Dr. Kayser gave the offertory prayer 
and the offering was taken by Queen Esthers. 

A young people's quartet sang "Are Ye Able," as robed young people 
gave a pantomime call to worship. 

Dr. E. L. Hutchens led in prayer. 

The pageant "My City Beautiful," by Mary F. Smith and A. Louise 
Sumwalt, members of the faculty of the Kansas City Training School, 
was given by a large group of children and their leaders. All of the 
music was furnished by the robed children's choir of 500, under the 
direction of Mr. Ralph Wright, director of music, Indianapolis Public 
Schools. '■:',_ 

The program closed with the recessional "America, the Beautiful." 



4.30 P. M. — Young People's Sunday Afternoon Vesper Hour 

An organ prelude by the church organist opened the program. The 
following musical numbers were given: Vocal solo by Mrs. Chester Mc- 
Pheeters, "I Love Life"; solo by Jane Butler, a Queen Esther girl, "Prayer 
Perfect"; Mr. Brooks Haynes, of Wood Junior College, gave a piano solo, 
"By the Sea"; The Bennett choir sang, "Go Down Moses" and "I'm So 
Glad Trouble Don't Last Always." 

The prayer was given by Mrs. Harry Hamilton, bureau secretary of the 
Young People's Department. 

There was a short statement made concerning the Youth Council at 
Boulder. 

The missionary speaker was Eda Jacobson, of Marcy Center, who 
spoke on "And Jesus Beheld the City and Wept Over Them." 

"The Evening Hymn" was sung by the audience in closing. 



5.30 P. M.— Sunday Afternoon, October 16, 1938 

The Wesleyan Service Guild Tea, at Roberts Park Church, was largely 
attended. Units which were present were introduced and members of the 
Board of Trustees who were present were also introduced. Miss Herbst, 
Mrs. L. E. Hoover, and Mrs. H. C. Metcalfe spoke briefly on the work which 
they are doing. 



Minutes. 71 

7.30 P. M.— Sunday Evening, October 16, 1938 

At 7.30 o'clock Mr. Dale Young played the following numbers: "Pre- 
lude in D Major," by Bach; and "Cantilena," by McKintey. Dr. Logan 
Hall, of the Meridian Street Methodist Church, led the worship service, 
using hymn 465, "Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life. ' He used the 
story of the Good Samaritan as the basis of his remarks. 

Uhe Bennett College choir then sang "Listen to the Lambs." 

The moving picture "Even in This Day and Age,' was presented after 
which Dr. Robert W. Searle, of New York City, author of the young- 
people's textbook for this year, spoke on "City Shadows." 

Dr. Nathan'el Dett played the special number for the offertory. 

Dr. Logan Hall pronounced the benediction. 



8.30 A. M.— Monday Morning, October 17, 1938 

Mrs. W. E. LONGSTRETH and Miss Sara Raskin led the morning 
watch using the theme "Unity in Service" for the meditation. 

Study classes followed. 

At 10.15 the hymn No. 491, "America, the Beautiful," was sung. 

Mrs. C. E. Asbury, corresponding secretary of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Soc'ety for the Indiana Conference was presented and in turn 
presented a basket of flowers from the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of Indiana Conference. 

Mrs. Aldrich, wife of the pastor of the church, and Mrs. W. H. Veen- 
boer, newly elected Trustee, were presented. 

Mrs. F. C. Reynolds, chairman of the committee for the National Train- 
ing School, Kansas City, presented the school and introduced Miss Eunice 
Britt, field repi'esentative of the school, who spoke briefly. 

Mrs. H. R. Hargis, bureau secretary for Friendship Homes, gave her 
report. 

Mrs. H. S. Metcalfe, City Missions, East Central, presented her bureau 
needs and introduced Miss Ethel Van Duren, who told of the needs at 
McCrum Settlement, where she is employed. 

Mrs. Edwin Sebring, North East Central Bureau, City Missions, pre- 
sented the report of her bureau. 

Mrs. Gilmour, chairman of tellers, announced the election of Mrs. Mil- 
dred Allen Knight as secretary of the Young People's Department. 

Mrs. Abel Spillman Stitt sang "The Living God." 

"Character Building Through Education," was the theme of the next 
unit of the program which was presented by Miss Muriel Day, who in- 
troduced the following speakers: Miss Carmen Lowry, superintendent of 
Allen School, Asheville, North Carolina, who spoke on "Character Building 
Through Academic Work"; Prof. Wilmer H. Tolle, of Pfeiffer Junior 
College, who spoke on "Extra-Curricular Activities"; Dr. Flemmie Kittrell, 
of Bennett College, who presented "Character Building Through Home 
Training"; and Dr. DeWitt S. Morgan, superintendent of Indianapolis 
schools, who spoke on "Character Building Through Training for Com- 
petence." 

Dr. Guy O. Carpenter, pastor of Central Methodist Church, gave the 
noontide message. 



Monday Afternoon, October 17, 1938 

'T'HE afternoon session opened at 1.45 o'clock. 

The organ prelude, "Carillon De Westminister," Viere; and "Bells 
Through the Trees," Edmundson; played by Mrs. John English, opened the 
program. 

Rev. E. Arnold Clegg conducted the worship service opening with 
hymn 465, "Where Cross the Crowded Ways," followed by prayer. 



72 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Announcements and introductions preceded the presentation of Miss 
Helen Edick who spoke on the Italian Settlement and Nursery School, at 
Utica, New York. 

Mrs. Robert Stewart, bureau secretary of Hospitals, spoke on the work 
accomplished and needs of Brewster Hospital. 

Miss Catherine Perry told of the work done at Medical Mission Dis- 
pensary, Boston. 

Dr. Lewis Taylor, president of Sibley Hospital, Washington, D. C, 
presented the hospital report. 

Miss Lillian Spicker, of Cincinnati, told of the work of the German 
Methodist deaconesses. 

Miss Flora Sorber, of the Methodist Deaconess Association, spoke on 
"Deaconess Work in Methodism." 

Miss Lora Lee Peterson, of the faculty of Scaritt College, Nashville, 
Tennessee, brought greetings from the college. 

The President then read greetings from Mrs. Mary Fisk Park and 
Mrs. Edith Park Oliver who were unable to attend the convention. Tha 
Secretary was instructed to send greetings to them and also to Mrs. May 
Leonard Woodruff. 

The election of Mrs. Austin Prynn as secretary of the Junior Depart- 
ment was announced. 

Mrs. Mary E. Stout, bureau secretary for Rest Homes, presented Mrs. 
E. T. Hilkert, hostess at Chautauqua Rest Home and superintendent of 
Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, who spoke briefly. Mrs. Stout then pre- 
sented the other homes in her bureau. 

A solo, "How Beautiful Upon the Mountains," Harker, sung by Mrs. 
Guy 0. Carpenter, with Mrs. Delamar McWorkman at the organ, was 
the next number on the program. 

Two stanzas of hymn No. 337, "Saviour, Like a Shepherd Lead Us," 
were sung. 

Miss Esther Claus, of Epworth School, then spoke on "Character 
Building Through Group Living." 

Miss Ethel Harpst, of Cedartown, Georgia, was presented and she in- 
troduced Miss Lois Green, a member of the Ethel Harpst Home family, who 
told of life at Harpst Home. 

Mr. Wilmer Tolle, instructor at Pfeiffer Junior College, showed some 
interesting moving pictures of the faculty, students, buildings, and activi- 
ties of the college. 

Mr. George Boase also told of the work at Pfeiffer Junior College. 

A presentation of red rosebuds, tied with red, white, and blue ribbon, 
was made to Miss Bertha M. Stephenson, editor of Junior Neighbors, by 
a group of children representing the Junior Department. 

A group of beautiful hand-painted pictures by various artists, to be 
given to various institutions, was presented by Mrs. Charles Smith. 

These were accepted by the President and the Secretary was asked to 
write a note of thanks to the artists. 



Monday Evening, October 17, 1938 

A FTER the organ prelude, "Fantaise in E," by Dubois, played by Mrs. 
John English, Dr. Richard M. Millard, pastor of Broadway Methodist 
Church, led the worship service. His meditation theme was "Walking 
With God," and the audience joined in the service in responsive readings 
for the call to worship, confession and prayer, scripture and benediction. 

The Broadway Church choir lead the worship of song and sang as 
anthems: "The Lord is My Keeper," by Van Denman Thompson; "Come 
Ye Disconsolate," by Webbe; "The Silent Sea," by W. H. Neidlinger; and 
"Go to Dark Gethsemane," by L. T. Noble. Mrs. English played the ac- 
companiments and also the offertory. 

The program was an evening in Puerto Rico with Mrs. Raymond 
Meek, bureau secretary for New York and Puerto Rico, presiding. 



Minutes. 73 

Mrs. W. R. Brown, First Vice-President, told what the oflficers "saw" 
in Puerto Rico when they went, during- the past year, to study our work 
there. 

Mrs. J. H. Freeman, national Treasurer, told "what must be done," fol- 
lowing which pledges were taken to build, as our sixtieth anniversary gift, 
a new building for the George 0. Robinson School, in San Juan, Puerto 
Rico. 

Conferences pledged a total of $31,585; special gifts of $11,345 were 
made; a total of $42,930. 

The story of Puerto Rico was told by moving pictures taken by Rev. 
Jay S. Stowell, Publicity Director for the Board of Home Missions and 
Church Extension. 

Dr. Millard pronounced the benediction. 



Tuesday Morning, October 18, 1938 

"TTiNITY THROUGH THE CROSS," was the theme of the morning 
watch under the leadership of Mrs. W. E. Longstreth and Miss Sara 
Estelle Haskin. Miss Haskin presented two meditations — one, "God's 
Cross"; the other, "Our Cross." 

Classes met at 9.15 and on returning to the auditorium at 10.15 the 
audience sang "God of Grace and God of Glory." 

The President appointed Mrs. H. C. Black, Mrs. Florence Carroll, and 
Miss Laura May Robinson to serve as a committee on courtesy resolutions. 

Mrs. Dan B. Bi-ummitt, chairman of the Schools of Missions Com- 
mittee, presented her report. 

Mrs. Franklin Lewis, chairman, reported for the Forward- Looking 
Committee for 1938-39 and Mrs. Foss Zartman, chairman of the 1939-40 
Forward-Looking Committee announced the theme of the interdenomina- 
tional study, "Christ and the Community, at Home and Abroad." The 
home study book is by Dr. Arthur H. Liniouge and is entitled "Christ and 
the World Community at Home." 

Mrs. D. D. Forsyth, chairman of the committee on Place of Annual 
Meeting, presented the delegation from the New England Conference: 
Mrs. E. S. Barker, president; Miss Emily S. Day, conference treasurer; 
Mrs. Clarence Avery, Young People's secretary; and Miss Catherine 
Perry, superintendent of Medical Mission, who invited the convention to 
hold its next session in New England Conference. This invitation was 
accepted. 

The Corresponding Secretary assisted by conference secretaries gave a 
demonstration enlisting interest in the sixtieth anniversary membership 
goal. 

Mrs. H. S. Osborn gave her report for the Mountaineer Bureau, Ken- 
tucky, Mississippi, and North Carolina. 

Mrs. H. C. Black, in the absence of the bureau secretary, Mrs. B. W. 
Meeks, Mountaineer Bureau, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee, read the 
report for the bureau. 

Miss Ruth Esther Wheaton, editor, told of her plans for Woman's Home 
Missions for the coming year; Miss Helen E. Cox, presented her work 
as editor of the Annual Report; Miss Bertha Stephenson, retiring editor of 
Junior Publications, introduced Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver and asked her to 
present the new editor, Mrs. H. F. Young. Mrs. George W. Keen, pub- 
lisher, closed the reports on publications and publicity. 

The Recording Secretary presented the nominations of the Board of 
Trustees for offices which are filled in this manner and the persons so 
nominated were elected by the Boai-d of Managers. 

Mrs. Wilmot Smith, chairman of the newly formed committee to ad- 
minister David and Mai'garet Home and San Diego Esther Hall, was 
selected in this capacity for the first time. 

Mrs. Anna Zook was elected secretary of the Bureau for Negro Work, 
combining the former bureaus of Co-operation with Board of Education 
and North and South Carolina and Florida. 



74 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Mrs. H. F. Young was elected editoi- of Junior Publications and Junior 
Neighbors, succeeding Miss Bertha Stephenson, who requested that she 
be released at the close of the Annual Meeting. 

For a complete list of officers see pages 8-11 of this Annual Report. 

Mrs. Adella Langill, of the Wesleyan Service Guild office, presented 
plans of the Guild. 

Mrs. Mildred A. Knight announced a goal of 13,000 plus net gain in 
members for the Young People's Department sixtieth anniversary gift 
and Mrs. Austin L. Prynn pledged 17,060 new members and a special 
gift of six cents for each member for the Junior Department's sixtieth 
anniversary gift. 

At the close of the moi-ning session Mrs. Anna Kresge, Vice-President, 
and Trustee member of the Committee on Alaska and the Northwest, 
showed colored pictures taken on her recent trip to Jesse Lee Home, 
Seward, Alaska. 

Tuesday Afternoon, October 18, 1938 

jyj RS. ELSIE EVANS PATTISON opened the meeting with organ music 
while pictures of Mothers' Memorial at Cincinnati were shown. Rev. 
Guy Lowry, of Brightwood Methodist Church gave the devotions. Hymn 
No. 382, "Glorious Things of Thee Are Spoken," was sung. 

Mrs. Smiley, chairman of the local committee, expressed her pleasure 
in serving and thanked all who had assisted her. 

Mrs. Goode introduced Mrs. Freeman, the national Treasurer, who pre- 
sented the chairman of Finance Methods, as follows: 

Mrs. 0. D. Jacoby spoke on the Lenten Offering. Mrs. J. Arthur Jones 
spoke on the power of the Mite Box. Mrs. John C. Rowe presented the 
great need for a larger fund for our retired workers. Mrs. H. G. Leonard 
gave the goals for thank offering. 

Building plans for the new building at East St. Louis were px-esented 
by Mrs. Frank L. Davis. She announced that the gymnasium will be 
named the Ethel T. Holland Gymnasium. 

Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver read an action of the Board of Trustees naming 
the main building in honor of Lessie Bates Davis (Mrs. Frank L. Davis). 

Mrs. Raymond Meek spoke of the need for the new building at George 
O. Robinson Home, Puerto Rico, which will be the sixtieth anniversary 
building project. 

A girls' sextette from Arsenal Technical High School gave a group 
of songs. 

Dr. Edward Evans, executive secretary of the Church Federation of 
Indianapolis was presented and spoke briefly. 

Miss Ada Townsend presented the following resolution: "The Com- 
mittee on Christian Citizenship wishes actively to promote all the causes 
which the Board of Managers has previously endorsed such as the pro- 
hibition of child labor, liquor advertising, block-booking and blind-selling 
of motion pictures, etc. We ask our membership to continue their efforts 
for peace, and to unite in fervent prayer for national and international 
peace; we remind them of their obligations at the foi^thcoming election. 
Also we ask permission to begin circulating petitions preliminary to the 
introduction into Congress of a bill looking toward the changing of our 
un-Christian Oriental Exclusion Act, including the attitude toward all 
minority groups in this country." 

Miss Ethel Harpst presented the architect's drawing of the new build- 
ings being erected at Harpst Home. These buildings are the gift of 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer and include an administration building, which 
will also provide rooms for boys and a superintendent's cottage. 

Building dreams were presented by Mrs. M. E. Stout and Mrs. C. P. 
Colegrove for Robincroft Rest Home where a new unit is greatly needed. 

Mr. C. C. Brooks and Mrs. L. E. Hoover showed how the dreamed-of 
additions at the Navajo School would increase the efficiency of the present 
staff who could teach many more students if there were living quarters 
for them. 



Minutes. 75 

Mrs. H. C. Black, chamnan of the committe on Courtesy Resolutions, 
read the report of that committee expressing the gratitude of the entire 
convention for the hospitality enjoyed during the meeting. 

Dr. E. E. Aldrich gave the closing message and conducted the consecra- 
tion service which served as the installation service for the officers who 
gathered at the altar as the Recording Secretary read the names of 
those who had been elected. 

Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, President, declared the fifty-seventh Annual 
Meeting of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church adjourned. 

Mrs. J. N. Rodeheaver, 
National Recording Secretary. 



Memorial List 



Friends ' 

Bishop Charles Wesley Burns Dr. Frank E. Day 

Dr. William B. Farmer Miss Sarah Green 

Miss Adella Ballard Dr. James Weldon Johnson 

Honorary Vice-Presidents 

Mrs. Earl Cranston Mrs. Edwin H. Hughes 

Former Bureau Secretary 

Mrs. L. H. Bunyan 

Deaconesses 

Miss Ida A. Jordan Miss Elizabeth Larish 

Miss Martha A. Drummer Miss Mary A. Crawford 

Miss Jennie Anderson 

Missionaries 

Miss Alice M. Hause Mrs. R. C. Richards 

Miss Grace Matthews Mrs. E. J. Morgan 

Mrs. Carrie Pearson Murphy 

Conference and District Officers 

Atlanta — Miss Cecelia Thornton 

Central Alabama — Mrs. C. F. Mayfield 

Central Pennsylvania — Miss Sarah Olewine 

Detroit — Mrs. O. B. Evans 

Illinois — Mrs. Elmo Giles 

Indiana—Mrs. J. R. Wilkinson, Mrs. Lillie Bence 

Kansas — Mrs. J. M. Ritters 

New York — Mrs. Samuel Williams 

North-East Ohio — Mrs. Maude Foster 

Northwest Iowa — Miss Leonie M. De Lay 

North Indiana — Mrs. E. H. Curtis 

Philadelphia -Mrs. E. L. Richards, Miss M. Simpson, Mrs. Albert Fram 

Pittsburgh—Mrs. W. F. Conner, Mrs. Robert W. Shindel 

Southern — Mrs. J. T. Bertrand 

West Wisconsin — Mrs. G. Stanley Joslin 

Wilmington — Mrs. Mary Todd Gambrill 

Wisconsin— Mrs. J. C. Schroeder, Mrs. C. G. Binkert 

Wyoming — Miss Alice Benedict 



To Serve the Present Age 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR BY THE NATIONAL PRESIDENT 
Mrs. W. H. C. Goode 



^N EVENTFUL YEAR in World History, counting from October, 1937, 
to October, 1938, has been completed since we met in Seattle. A rather 
quiet and fairly prosperous year is the record of our organization. 

We have chosen as the theme of this year's program, "To Serve the 
Present Age." What are the needs of the present age, and how can they 
be met by our Society, are questions to be discussed at this meeting. 

I read recently the statement, "The big thing is to get men and women 
world-conscious — not as Americans, Chinese, or Europeans, but as Chris- 
tians." This is what we are putting before ourselves in the organization of 
Methodist Women of the United Church. World consciousness includes an 
awareness of our own country with its great needs, as well as the countries 
across the seas. 

This paper is being written during the last week of September. I stopped 
writing to listen to the report of the Prime Minister of England on the dis- 
memberment of Czechoslovakia. The world-consciousness of all nations has 
become acute during the past year. We have suffered with the Spaniards 
as they have cruelly killed one another, but we have done very little about 
it. We have been emotionally stirred up about China and have sent a few 
pennies or dollars to keep a few people from starvation a few days longer. 
We could not sleep for a night or two because of the iniquitous purges of 
Hitler. We have sat by the telephone all this week fearing there would be 
a world war again because of the ambition of a selfish, implacable, braggart 
who is ruling Germany, and tonight many of us are having a heartache 
for brave, courageous Czechoslovakia. 

Doubtless a large factor in the surrender of Great Britain and France 
to Hitler's war threat was the economic condition of all countries. Economic 
recovery will not be likely to arrive until the nations of the world unite 
simultaneously in genuine recovery measures among which is, according to 
Mr. Hull himself, the incentive to private capital outlay, an economy based 
upon free individual enterprise. We are thankful that there is not to be 
war, though ashamed of the terms of peace. We believe that there can be 
no peace until there is a righteous peace based upon the rights of all indi- 
viduals to self-determination in regard to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of 
happiness." 

Oh, yes, we are world conscious this year, but to most of us it is con- 
sciousness of a strife-ridden world where we, too, are fighting on one side 
or the other. 

This is not the world-consciousness of Jesus who came down to earth 
with such a heart full of love that he could serve in the ranks of both 
belligerents. We need a Christ-consciousness of the brotherhood of man. 
This may be brought about by a knowledge of the social conditions of our 
brethren all over the world. 

76 



Annual Message of the President. 77 

The Director of the Wesley Foundation in Japan pleads that while many 
people are urging a boycott of all things Japanese, we be very careful that 
we do not boycott the Gospel of Love. The same warning could be voiced 
regarding our attitude toward Germany and Italy — lest we forget that "while 
we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." 

Recent Conferences 

But there are encouraging things happening just now or during the year. 
Largely important was a meeting at Utrecht, of the "Provisional Confer- 
ence," to formulate plans for a World Council of Churches. We spoke of 
this projected plan last year. Now another step has been taken. At the 
close of the meeting, the Archbishop of York said: "We have been led by 
the Holy Spirit. What has been achieved here is more than the doing of 
man," and this expressed the thought of the majority of delegates. We 
called attention last October to Dr. E. Stanley Jones's address at the Preach- 
ing Mission when he made that appeal for Christian unity. The union of 
the three Methodisms is one of the steps toward the union of all Protestant- 
ism and the World Council, which is to function through (1) an Assembly 
meeting every five years and composed of not more than 450, officially ap- 
pointed members with (2) a central committee composed of not more than 90 
from the assembly, with lay members as well as clergy will, we hope, really 
start "A fellowship of churches which accepts our Lord Jesus Christ as 
God and Saviour." 

The National Youth Conference which met in Boulder, and to which we 
had the privilege of sending Miss Helen Johnson and eleven Queen Esther 
girls, was a splendid gathering of young people who represent the finest 
type of youth which can be found in our country. 

With the courage and freedom of youth they discussed, approved, or 
condemned the work which we older people are carrying on throughout the 
church and the nation. Their frankness is refreshing and sometimes devas- 
tating. We are almost sorry that the passionate energy, brought on by a 
certainty of the rightness of their judgment, will so soon pass, but the 
world will be a step nearer the Kingdom because of it. 

I was interested in a statement which was given to the young people 
by a youth leader who warned against "the subtle temptation of allowing 
our religion to become merely going from one conference to another." . . . 
He said, "The real work is done back home." The only value of "bigger and 
better conferences" is what happens in the local situation. 

We are hoping that as these young people go back to work in their 
respective churches that the thing which will be most talked about will not 
be the criticisms of actions of boards and our old fogy methods, but a de- 
termined effort to create a vital interest in the whole program of the church 
in the local community. 

Religion and Welfare Recovery 

One of the interesting new groups which is now functioning is the one 
headed "Religion and Welfare Recovery." Its program is thus described, 
"A co-operating educational program in the interests of all religious, edu- 
cational, medical, scientific, character-building, and welfare institutions and 
agencies." Now that is a gigantic program. It reminds us of that saying 
by a certain young Man who created consternation when He said, "I am 
come that ye may have LIFE and have it more abundantly." This Commit- 
tee called October 1 and 2 "Loyalty Days" and is stressing the National 
Stewardship Convention which will meet in Chicago, November 1-3 of this 
year. The Committee is composed of recognized leaders from the larger 
religious faiths, and its announced effort is to try to bring the minds and 
hearts of men back to the consciousness of Fatherhood of God and the 
brotherhood of man, and the possibility of that abundant life being obtain- 
able by the natives of Africa and Alaska and New York City. 

In relation to the stewardship program, the statement is made that: "For 
a hundred years previous to the World War catastrophe, voluntary gifts for 
the support of churches, schools, hospitals, and private philanthropy were 



78 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

approximately the same as our total national expenditure for army, navy, 
and military budgets. Today we are spending through taxes for army and 
navy twice as much as is given to churches, and this includes all Protestant, 
Catholic, and Hebrew denominations. Even during the depression we in- 
creased our expenditure for army and navy by $267,700,000, while decreasing 
our gifts to twenty-five major religious bodies lay $88,580,596. If there were 
no other argument for the need of increasing the interest of church women 
in the home missionary program, this condition surely would be sufficient. 
Never in the history of the world has the menace of materialism been 
more appalling. In the political, economic, and social fields of endeavor it 
has produced suicidal strife, and the sad thing is that we are not discussing 
European conditions when we make this statement. 

University Christian Mission 

Beginning this week, while we are in session, the University Christian 
Mission will start its plan of spending one week on the campus of each of 
thirteen state universities bringing the claim of Christian faith to the stu- 
dents. They will visit Oregon, Washington, Colorado, Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, 
Nebraska, Texas, Pennsylvania, and Tuskegee, with Dr. E. Stanley Jones, 
Dr. T. Z. Koo, and many others whom we know and admire as speakers. We 
long for the same for our Methodist colleges and our missionary institutions. 

Madras 

Then that wonderful meeting which is to be held at Madras at Christmas- 
time. Miss Sally Lou McKinnon, the Foreign Secretary of the Women's Mis- 
sionary Council of the Methodist Church, South, is one of the delegates. 
It will begin where the Jerusalem Congress left off. 

Amsterdam 

I do not know how many of our Met,liodist youth will be able to attend 
the wonderful conference at Amsterdam, Holland, beginning July 26, 1939. 
I hope some of the Boulder Conference group will be there. 

All of these thrilling interesting meetings are being held to arouse us 
as Christians to more earnest service. What measures are being taken by 
our organization to meet the challenge of this day — To Serve the Present 
Age? 

Million Unit Fellowship 

Another event of importance to all Methodist women is the Million Unit 
Fellowship, now in its second year. The Second Safari, as our leader, Mrs. 
J. M. Avann, has named the meeting of all Methodist women, has been 'fixfed 
for November 15. We are Methodist women before we are Woman's Home 
Missionary Society women, so we are urging all the members of our Society 
to co-operate with the wives of their respective pastors to make this the 
greatest All-Methodist Day in the history of the Church. There was a sad 
decrease in the September World Service givings over this month last year. 
Let us do our part in helping to bring up the entire connectional work of 
the Church by our assistance at this special woman's program. 

The Sixtieth Anniversary 

We are planning a Sixtieth Anniversary. We cannot tell until after the 
Unifying Conference has met what will be the earliest date for new organir 
zations to begin to work. Nineteen hundred and forty would be the earliest 
possible date, I think. The Woman's Home Missionary Society Avill be sixty' 
years old June 8, 1940, and by June 8, 1940, we are expecting from this 
loyal group of women so much enthusiastic determination, so much of the 
divine efflatus, so much of courageous endeavor that the goal in membership, 
in magazines, and money will be more than reached. May we plan a great 
forward movement from this day, October 12, 1938, so that by October 12, 
1939, the goals will be in sight and by June 8, 1940, we shall lay our gifts 
and ourselves upon the altar of our Lord as a glad sacrifice and hand over 
to the new organization a strong group of Methodist women, young women 



Annual Message of the President. 79 

and children to accept enthusiastically and to go forward gladly along the 
new lines which have been constructed for us by the action of the Unifying 
Conference. 

Unification 

The new church will be a greater church because of its increased mem- 
bership. It is up to us to make it a greater church because of its deeper 
spiritual life, its clearer world vision, its ever-increasing and ever-deepening 
love, devotion, reverence for its living Head, our Lord and Saviour, Jesus 
Christ. 

The Plan of Unification is in all of our thinking. During these last few 
annual meetings of our Board of Managers as a separate unit of women's 
work, I believe we have an added tenderness for the Mother Society and a 
deeper appreciation of what has been done. We are especially glad to see 
one another this year; the family tie seems stronger than ever. The bureau 
secretaries will hold their work even more closely to their hearts during 
the coming fttv yeai's that they will administer it. The trustees are getting 
the trousseau ready for the marriage with all the anxiety and hopes and 
fears which every mother feels when her dear daughter is preparing to 
enter a new home. As conference women, we are feeling the urge to become 
moi'e efficient in all ways and are wondering just how we shall work in the 
new church, but very sure that it will be delightful to have so many more 
missionary sisters. The local auxiliaries, most important of all, must be 
advised concerning preliminary steps. 

It is very difficult to say today just what the new organization of women 
will be. The Committee of Women's Work of our own denomination met 
twice, and with much frankness studied our denominational conditions. It 
was agreed with very little argument that there should be one organization 
for women. This seemed to be the desire of many of the pastors and of 
many of the women as they studied the conditions in the local church. 

June 3, 4, 1938 

After consultation between the leaders of the societies involved, a meet- 
ing was called of the representatives of the women's organizations in the 
three denominations on the above date. There were five from each of the 
societies in the Methodist Episcopal Church, ten from the Methodist Church, 
South, and five from the Methodist Protestant Church. Two days were spent 
in deliberation, and finally an agreement was reached that there should be 
one Woman's Organization for Home and Foreign Missions, Ladies' Aid, 
and other women's groups in the local church. 

The other two denominations have been working with a united Board 
of Missions, men and women, home and foreign, but with very little atten- 
tion to the group which is most commonly known as the "Ladies' Aid" or 
"Parish Department," as found in most of the churches of the North. This 
group of women who are not especially missionai^y-minded, but are loyal, 
Christian women, should be definitely recognized. Our woman's organiza- 
tions said that, and it came to be a part of the recommendation which went 
from this representative group to the Committee on Missions. 

Item on Relationship to General Church Boards 

The following is the form of resolution which was eventually voted: 
"I. We, a group of twenty-seven official representatives from the several 
women's organizations within the three branches of Methodism involved in 
the Plan of Union, do hereby affirm our conviction that a woman's organiza- 
tion in the Methodist Church now being formed is essential. 

"II. We are agreed that this organization should include in its scope the 
interests and activities of The Woman's Home Missionary Society, the Wom- 
an's Foreign Missionary Society, the Wesleyan Service Guilds, and the 
Ladies' Aid Societies of the Methodist Episcopal Church; the missionary 
work and the share in the local activities embraced in the Woman's Con- 
vention of the Methodist Protestant Church and the lines of work and in- 
terests included in the section of Woman's Work of the Boai'd of Missions 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 



80 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

"III. We are agreed that this organization should operate under its own 
Constitution and By-Laws which shall guarantee to it the right to form 
plans and policies; to promote a program of missionary education for women, 
young people, and children; to enlist, train, and support workers (including 
missionaries and deaconesses) at home and abroad and to sustain the re- 
sponsibilities already assumed by the organizations herein mentioned and 
the work which shall be enterprised by it in the future. 

"IV. We are agreed that in the children's and youth's program of the 
United Church, provision should be made for groups organizationally related 
to the women's work and harmonized with the educational program of the 
Board of Education. 

"V. The woman's organization shall work in co-operation with the gen- 
eral boards of the church. 

"VI. We recommend that there shall be a United Board of Mission Strat- 
egy, composed of an equal representation from the general missionary or- 
ganization and the woman's organization. A responsibility of the United 
Board of Mission Strategy shall be to co-ordinate plans and policies of the 
total missionary program." 

The Committee on Missions, created by the Committee on Unification, 
met at Ocean Grove, August 17. The women of the three denominations 
were represented by the President of the Women's Missionary Council of 
the Church South, by the President and one Vice-President from the Wom- 
an's Convention of the Methodist Protestant Church, and by the Presidents 
of the two societies of our own denomination. Several days were spent in 
discussion of the advantages of one board, of two boards, or three boards, 
and a vote was taken which would create a Board of Women's Activities. 
This action is far from final, as it will be scrutinized again by the Committee 
on Missions, the Committee on Unification, and come up for action by the 
Unifying Conference. 

All of the Subcommittees which were appointed by the Committee on 
Unification will send to that Committee their plans for harmonizing the 
disciplines of the three denominations along the specific lines which were 
entrusted to them. All of these propositions will probably be published in 
the very early spring so that delegates to the Unifying Conference will have 
the opportunity of studying the proposed plans before they attend the con- 
ference. Their plans will be presented and probably all of them modified 
before they finally receive approval by this conference. 

Following the Unifying Conference there will be a general Conference 
which will put into action the plans which have been voted by the Unifying 
Conference, and will especially direct the organizational setup of the Juris- 
dictional Conferences. 

A new type of organization will appear in the Methodist Church 
because of the introduction of jurisdictions. You will have opportunity dur- 
ing this session to study the map of the United States as divided into juris- 
dictions. Whatever form each board of the church will take on will have to 
come up through what will be known as a Jurisdictional Conference. While 
the Annual Conference is the basic unit in all three Methodist Churches, 
yet, with the formation of jurisdictions, the conferences in the jurisdiction 
will function through this joint body — the Jurisdictional Conference. The 
Jurisdictional Conferences will head up in the General Conference. It makes 
an additional step from the local church to the General Conference, but 
the new church will be so very large that this additional grouping will prob- 
ably increase its efficiency. 

May I repeat that when we discuss women's work in the new church we 
must remember that everything which we are saying today is very tentative, 
as all the recommendations and plans of work must be submitted to the 
Committee on Unification and then be scrutinized very carefully, and we 
hope, prayerfully, by the members of the Unifying Conference. 

The proposed Board of Women's Activities as voted by the Subcommittee 
on Missions is a fairly autonomous body. The final authority is to be 
vested, as you recall, in an overhead commission, but it is to be composed 
of twenty-four persons — twelve men and twelve women — and each group 
will select its own representatives. 



Annual Message of the President. 81 

Puerto Rico and Alaska 

Among the interesting things which came to the President during the 
year was a visit to Puerto Rico and to Alaska. We shall present to you on 
Monday night an appeal for a new building at Puerto Rico. 1 thin.v after 
you have heard the story of the very grave conditions there you will feel 
that undoubtedly an important gift to celebrate the Society's Sixtieth Anni- 
versary will be a new dormitory in this very needy field. 

When this visit was made it was in connection with a special visit 
planned by the Board of Home Missions at the time of the Puerto Rican 
Annual Conference. Rev. Jay S. Stowell, who will present the pictures of 
the work on Monday night, conducted the tour and Bishop Charles W. Flint 
was the presiding bishop of the conference. Going in this way gave us an 
opportunity which we would not otherwise have had to study the island and 
the work which is being done by our denomination there. 

When we think of a little island with a rapidly increasing population 
which has now reached the number of 500 people to the square mile, with 
less than fifty per cent of the children of school age attending any sort 
of school, we see how tremendously important it is that The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society arrange to double, at least, the enrollment of our one 
educational institution and plan for more kindergartens. 

Conditions in Alaska were different and yet important. The climate in 
both of these places — the island and the territory — require a different mode 
of life and type of institution than on the mainland. The heat and the 
continuous destruction caused by termites in Puerto Rico and the very great 
dampness and lack of sunshine for so many months in Alaska call for 
constant repairs of all sorts to buildings, and both conditions are hard on 
the nerves of the workers. The committee which visited each of these 
places was very glad to have had this opportunity of really seeing the needs. 
Needs of the natives are not only physical in these two fields, but intellectual 
and spiritual. The inertia, lack of self-control, sexual vices, and all forms 
of moral weakness are the same as in other exploited groups, and add to 
the problems which confront all missionaries. 

There seems to be very little racial antagonism in Puerto Rico. The 
three district superintendents of the Methodist Episcopal Church represented 
three nationalities — one an American, another a Negro, and third a Latin 
American. 

In Alaska there is the same lack of racial harmony between the natives 
and the white people as between the colored race and the white race in the 
United States. Fortunately the city of Seward permits the children of 
Jesse Lee Home who are ready for high school to attend the Seward High 
School, and some of the best graduates have been from our institution. The 
grade school was built by the territory which furnishes the teachers for our 
group of children. We found the town sympathetic and co-operative with 
the Society. The acquaintances which were made by your President twelve 
years ago were happily renewed during this visit. 

The visiting committee, in each case, arranged for the absolutely nec- 
essary repairs. For Alaska these had been planned by the bureau secretary, 
with whom the Committee spent a day before sailing, and after returning 
to Seattle. The bureau secretary of Puerto Rico accompanied us. In each 
of these fields we were very happy with the management. The new super- 
intendent at each school seemed admirably equipped for the place. 



Changes 

The transfer of Rebecca McCleskey Hall to the Board of Education for 
the use of Snead Junior College has been completed, and now that whole 
institution is under the management of the President of Snead. Our super- 
intendent of Rebecca McCleskey is happily engaged at Wood Junior College 
and the teacher of home economics at Pfeiffer. 



82 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

The new Science Building at Pfeiffer Junior College was named for our 
ti'easurer, the Jane Freeman Hall. It is a very attractive building and 
splendidly equipped. Every room is taken at this school and there is a 
waiting list for this popular institution. 

Our very generous friend and trustee, Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer, has again 
come forward with a beautiful gift of a new dormitory and Administration 
Building for Harpst Home and a beautiful and adequate residence for the 
superintendent of the institution. More people stop at Cedartown, I think, 
on their way South, than at most of our institutions. We shall be glad for 
you to stop on your way home from Florida, at least, to see these two build- 
ings which the bureau secretary and Miss Harpst will tell you about later 
in the program. 

A very much-needed building is in process of erection at Bennett College. 
The General Education Board (the Rockefeller Foundation) has erected the 
building, and again Mrs. Pfeiffer has made the building possible by fur- 
nishing $100,000 to endow it. 

The transfer of conference institutions, under the Southern California 
Conference, especially David and Margaret Home and Esther Hall at San 
Diego to the national Society, has been completed, and these two splendid 
pieces of work are now being handled by the National Board. The President 
of the former local board for David and Margaret will chair a committee 
to take care of this work until unification is completed. 

Other bureaus have made important repairs in their institutions, and 
throughout the entire field of our activities there has been decided progress 
both in the upkeep of the institutions and in the type of work which is 
being done. 

I want especially to call your attention to the fine group of missionaries 
and deaconesses whom you have met this morning, and will meet as they 
tell the stories of their work during the convention days. The academic 
preparation of those who are engaged in the educational work of the society 
is constantly improving, and the professional training for those in social 
work is bringing into our Society women who are recognized in the cities in 
which they work because of their ability. 

The requirements for positions in accredited high schools and junior 
colleges are increasing, and since the work which is carried on by the 
Church of Christ is more important than that done by the Government, our 
teachers, social workers, nurses, superintendents, and presidents must have, 
at least, equal training with these in public service. We are very proud of 
our group of home missionary workers and of our deaconesses. We are 
happy to note the number who are working for additional collegiate recog- 
nition. 

This year we have as our special line of study "The City." We are to 
present to both city and rural communities the good and the evil of the 
cities and from such a study try to build up a program of more efficient 
service in this annually increasing dwelling place of our nation's inhabi- 
tants. 

We are to look at the parks and palaces and at the churches and cathe- 
drals — and we are to look at the slums, which we should be clearing out, we 
are to see the sinning and suffering multitudes which are our responsi- 
bility because our Lord said "Inasmuch," and we are to try hard to make 
every city in which we work a better place for folk to live. 

George Sokolsky said in a recent magazine, "A racket can never exist 
where the law is enforced," and "The man higher up in every racket is a 
politician," so we must serve the present age by a study of the character 
of the candidates for whom we are asked by our political parties to vote. 
We cannot, as Christians, fail to be interested in our government. 

We read of the tragedies of one day in a great city and wonder again 
what Christ would do if He came to Chicago or New York or Indianapolis. 
Well, He is coming into each city of the United States through you and 
me, and what we shall do in our respective cities, is what we permit the 



Annual Message of the President. 83 

Lord to do working through us. He is so willing and ready to direct our 
puny efforts if we are willing and ready to follow His lead. 

"0 beautiful for patriot dream, 
That sees beyond the years, 
Thine alabaster cities gleam, 
Undimmed by human tears." 

It will take a staunch patriot with a very long vision to see any such 
"alabaster" vision in our present-day cities, but if we can by the work of 
our organization during this present year clean up one street, rescue one 
child from a slum environment, keep one bad man out of office and put one 
better man in, we may perhaps be accorded an entrance into that city 
which John saw in his vision, the Holy City — the city which the Lord God 
shall make His dwelling place. The year is still young in our organizational 
plans. Let us make it our best. 

"May the strength of God pilot us. 

May the power of God preserve us. 

May the wisdom of God instruct us. 

May the hand of God protect us. 

May the way of God direct us. 

May the shield of God defend us. 

May the host of God guard us. 

Against the snares of the Evil One and the temptations of the world. 

May Christ be with us. 

Christ before us. 

Christ over us. 

May thy salvation, O Lord, 

Be ours this day and forevermore." 



• .■-i>i 



Annual Report of the Corresponding 
Secretary 

Mrs. V. F. DeVinny 

THE LIVING CHURCH 

And are we yet alive, 

To see each other's face? 
Glory and praise to Jesus give 

For His redeeming grace. 

What troubles have we seen, 

What conflicts have we passed, 
Fightings without and fears within 

Since we assembled last. 

But out of all the Lord 

Hath brought us by His love; 
And still He doth His help afford 

And hides our life above. 

— Methodist Hymnal, 402. 

"p^OR this occasion which brings us together again, we fervently thank 
God as we present to you, the Board of Managers and to the con- 
stituency of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and our many friends, the annual report of the corre- 
sponding secretary for 1937-1938. We look back over the past year and 
preceding ones and appraise them as years of real testing of our organ- 
izational stamina. Although they have been years of stress and strain 
and we have not passed through them unscathed, our colors are still 
flying and victory is written upon our banners. The organization has 
withstood similar periods in the fifty-eight years of its existence. It also 
has seen years of rapid growth and splendid financial prosperity. All 
may be counted as years of magnificent achievement, but we doubt if any 
period has brought deeper satisfaction to missionary women than the 
present one which, perforce, has exacted real sacrificial service of both 
leaders and members. A glorious company of the faithful has brought 
up reinforcements and has done battle against many adverse and dis- 
couraging conditions. We bring this report, as we have others, with sin- 
cere gratitude for the opportunity of serving a noble cause and for the 
supreme joy of association with the thousands of intelligent and devoted 
Methodist women who comprise the membership of this organization. We 
shall confine this report to two aspects of the work which are the direct 
responsibility of this office — the organizational and the promotional ac- 
tivities. 

The State of the Organization 
It has been said that an attitude of interested dispassionateness in 
report-writing is not by any means a normal, human characteristic, because 
judgment is apt to be dominated by personal sentiment or colored by feeling 
rather than fact. We have tried to avoid these pitfalls in the preparation 
of this report. After careful review of the year's activities and a thorough 
analysis of the annual reports from eighty-two conferences, we find the 
organization in a stable and flourishing condition. This statement is 
substantiated by the fact that our leaders in conference, district, and 
auxiliary offices are giving most untiringly of their time and talents, and 
in the main the supporting membership is exhibiting an intelligent and 
devoted interest in the work. 

84 



Report of Corresponding Secretary. 85 

Our growth in recent years has not been spectacular, and often not 
especially encouraging, but we have been able to hold a fairly stable mem- 
bership and make some advancement, and this is no small achievement. 
Few, if any, organizations carrying on philanthropic work have withstood 
the strain of the times better than this one. Furthermore, there is some- 
thing more profoundly important in our organizational stability than appears 
on the surface; something which proves that the basic motives which 
brought the work into being still command the allegiance of Methodist 
women; something which confirms our belief that Methodist women see in 
the home missionary enterprise a real opportunity for service, and be- 
cause their loyalties are unified by a common purpose in this sei'vice, they 
will neither retreat nor accept defeat. New occasions are pressing us 
to undertake new duties, and the changing order calls for the molding 
of new organizational forms to fit the new day. We have every reason to 
believe that both officers and constituency will face these changing con- 
ditions with forthrightness and courage, having "confidence that He who 
has begun a good work in us will go on to perfect it in preparation for 
the day of Jesus Christ" (Philippians 1. 6). 

Vital Statistics 

In reporting factual matters it is easy to succumb to the temptation to 
cumber a report with a mass of figures which may have great value to the 
corresponding secretary's office, but little to the rank and file of the member- 
ship. We shall try to exercise restraint and give only those figures which 
we feel will interest and enlighten you regarding the progress of the work, 
together with those which reveal the losses. We believe it is important 
that you see both the lights and shadows of the organizational picture and 
evaluate the whole in its true perspective. 

It is encouraging to be able to report 10,453 new auxiliary membei-s and 
1,764 new Young Woman's Auxiliary members added to our rolls during 
the past year. But despite the gain in new members, we did not have a net 
increase in auxiliary membership. Net increases or decreases in the adult 
department are determined in ratio to the steadiness with which the auxil- 
iaries hold their current membership. We averaged approximately 1,000 
new auxiliary members per month during the ten active working months 
last year, and this is a splendid record. However, since only a small per 
cent of our loss each year can be charged to deaths, removals, and other 
natural causes, we must conclude that our failure to show a net gain in 
auxiliary members is largely due to loss of so-called "nominal" members 
— those who do not attend the auxiliary meetings regularly and have only 
a casual interest in missions. 

The importance of stressing dues-paying early in the year, of doing 
follow-up work among delinquents, and of cultivating these nominal mem- 
bers, cannot be overestimated. In fact, eternal vigilance is the price we 
must pay for steady membership. Our new members are a decided asset, 
but the old members are equally important. Forty conferences had net 
gains in auxiliary membership. Philadelphia Conference led with a net 
gain of 313. There were seven conferences that did not report any new 
auxiliary members and, sad to say, eleven conferences with 200 or more 
new auxiliary members did not have net increases. Many conferences 
attributed their net gains to the wide use of the New Loyalty Project. This 
device will be used again this year. However, let us keep clearly in mind 
that any device we may use is not an end in itself, but merely a means to 
an end, and even good means must be held in their true proportion or 
they may lapse into methods altogether unworthy of the high purpose 
which membership in a Christian organization denotes. After all, it is 
not dues but discipleship that is the fundamental objective of all our effort 
for members. Let us continue to strive persistently but consistently to 
bring more Methodist women into the fellowship of service, which is an 
orderly means of expressing both the individual and the group impulses 
for altruistic service by providing opportunities for Christian achievement 
on a large scale. 



86 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Adult Auxiliaries 

The merging or closing of town and rural churches accounts in part 
for a shrinkage in auxiliary units. Although 116 new auxiliary units were 
organized, we still lack 52 of having as many adult auxiliaries reported 
this year as last. Several conferences had net increases. Pittsburgh led 
with six, and Missouri followed with five. It may interest you to know 
that in anticipation of unification, a few small auxiliaries in our Southern 
conferences united with auxiliaries of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, during the past year. 

Young Woman's Auxiliaries 

For three successive years Young Woman's Auxiliaries and membership 
have been showing steady gains. A net increase of 32 units this year is 
most encouraging, as is also the net increase of 630 in membership. While 
we deplore the losses in adult auxiliaries and membership, the growth of 
Young Woman's Auxiliaries is bringing hopeful reinforcement to the adult 
department. The conferences should recognize the potential possibili- 
ties for greater growth and fine leadership in the Young Woman's Auxil- 
iaries. Contacts should be made with young matrons in unorganized 
churches, and more conference and district offices should be filled from this 
group. Central Pennsylvania and Pittsburgh Conferences tie with a net 
increase of seven Young Woman's Auxiliaries each, and Pittsburgh leads 
with a net increase of 215 Young Woman's Auxiliary members. 

Honorary and Conference Members 

We bring to your attention the need of cultivating the men in our 
churches. There was a net loss of 115 honorary members in 1937-1938. 
Renewed emphasis on honorary dues being applied to the salaries of our 
men missionaries might further the interest of the clergy and laymen in 
Woman's Home Missionary Society work. Try it. 

Even the small net gain of 29 conference members should encourage 
our officers to greater effort along this line. That there are approximately 
14,000 churches in our branch of Methodism without a unit of The Woman's 
Home Missionary Society is proof that there are still great untouched 
resources in these churches. In August we sent a letter to each district 
corresponding secretary (325 in all), urging again, as we have in previous 
years, the importance of contacts with these churches and suggesting a 
possible promotional approach. Many district officers have acknowledged 
our letters and expressed their determination to try the methods we sug- 
gested. 

The total adult membership, including 219 new perpetual members, is 
171,646 1/^. This is a net increase of 763%. We shall give only totals for 
the other departments, for their reports will be given in detail by their 
respective secretaries. 

The total units of organization are as follows: 

Auxiliary 5.283 

Young Woman's Auxiliary 659 

Wesleyan Service Guild 363 

Young People's 2,662 

Juniors 3,411 

Grand Total 12,378 

Total membership in all departments: 

Adult (inc. Wesleyan Service Guild) 171,646y2 

Young People's 31,566 

Juniors 59,894 

Grand Total .263,106y2 

A net gain in total membership of 1,302^/2. 



Report of Corresponding Secretary. 87 

Study Course and Goals 

The wide use of the Study Course, together with the decided gain in 
auxiliaries achieving all goals on the poster, is indicative of a loyal support 
of the official program of the Society and an earnest effort to strengthen 
the organizational activities. Our publisher reported 4,270 Study Courses 
sold. In Idaho and New Mexico Conferences all the auxiliaries used the 
Study Course. 

A new poster is featured each year because there is still a demand for 
this device. Its use is optional with the auxiliary. However, we must re- 
emphasize the value of goals as a means of educating for leadership, in- 
creasing membership, securing subscriptions to the magazines, promoting 
the finances, developing good citizenship, deepening spiritual life, and 
stressing co-operation with the pastor in local church activities. The goals 
should be undei'taken by every auxiliary, regardless of whether the poster 
is used or not. Seven hundred and fourteen auxiliaries reached all the 
goals. This means that 714 auxiliaries are stronger and more effective 
units of the Society because of their consistent efforts to reach definite 
objectives. Missouri Conference led, with 26% of its auxiliaries achieving 
all goals. 

Visitation and Joint Organizations 

The report on visitation of national, conference, district officers, and 
auxiliary representatives totaled 8,948. This was a notable increase over 
1936-1937. 

The movement toward uniting the Woman's Foreign and the Woman's 
Home Missionary Societies in the local churches increased slightly during 
the past year. One thousand three hundred and ten joint or union so- 
cieties were reported, an increase of 62. Each year many more joint so- 
cieties are subscribing to and using the Study Course prepared especially 
for them. Approximately 1,000 were used during 1937-38. This is en- 
couraging, for there has been a tendency in many of the joint societies 
to substitute a popular variety program for a mission-centered one, and 
because of this, much real missionary education and inspiration have been 
lost. The joint course also helps to maintain a balanced interest in both 
missionary societies. 

Promotion 

The main purpose of promotion is to undergird all organizational activi- 
ties; hence it is essential that we have certain definite objectives and many 
promotional methods to further this pui'pose. From year to year we have 
released new projects and suggested new methods, and with each we have 
endeavored to hold to our threefold purpose to build the pi'omotional work 
upon educational, social, and spiritual processes. Our three regular, full- 
time promotional workers have wholeheartedly co-operated in carrying for- 
ward the policies of the department unhampered by any restriction of 
their initiative or methods. With differing personalities, each has done her 
work in her own way, and has made a distinct contribution of service to 
the ongoing of the organizational activities. These workers visited 35 
conferences — a few at two different periods — during 1937-1938, and in 
addition taught during the summer in Schools of Missions, Girls' Camps, 
and Daily Vacation Bible Schools. 

Missionary Journeys 

Last year's major project, "Missionary Journeys," sent forty mission- 
aries from our institutions into fifty-five different conferences. The results 
of these journeys cannot be tabulated in figures, nor can any adequate 
record be written of their achievements except as it is written in the 
hearts of those who heard from the missionaries themselves the stirring 
stories of the work of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. Our grati- 
tude goes to each who rendered this fine service, and to the Bureau Secre- 
taries who co-operated so splendidly with us by releasing their workers. All 



88 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

but five of our 82 conferences were visited during the year by either a 
missionax'y or a promotional worker, and for good measui'e, bureau sec- 
retaries, chairmen of Standing Committees, national officers, and Trus 
tees rendered service by speaking and teaching. 



Leadership Education 

Leadership Education will be a major concern of the promotional de- 
partment this year. We consider this so important that a part of the 
national promotional budget will be used to subsidize institutes in con- 
ferences that cannot finance their own, and teachers will be supplied 
where necessary. That more emphasis on preparation of officers for po- 
sitions of leadership in the Society is urgently needed, is illustrated by the 
all too frequent lack of well-trained women to fill vacancies when old 
officers retire or resign. During the past year in one of our strongest 
conferences, four of its districts had new presidents, five new corresponding 
secretaries, and in addition, the conference corresponding secretary had to 
be replaced. With the exception of just one, none of the new officers had 
any previous experience in the work of the Society or any preparatory 
training for the offices they accepted. 

Miss Mary Holman will spend this year giving special emphasis to 
Leadership Education among our Negro constituency in preparing them 
for the larger leadership they will undoubtedly have under the jurisdic- 
tional plan in the united church. Mrs. Cora Downs Stevens and Miss Helen 
Johnson will be available for this same kind of work in other sections, 
and in addition, many national and conference leaders will be commandeered 
for this service. 

Promotion "to Serve the Present Age" 

We are laying plans for an altogether new type of promotion which 
we shall call an Orientation Project. This project will be concerned with 
developing new loyalties and building new mental attitudes in preparation 
for the changes we are facing in woman's activities in the new church. 
This will be something of a psychological process. Probably none of us 
is really prepared for these changes — changes which will undoubtedly 
call for the espousal of many new interests and for making new adjust- 
ments in old relationships. We shall have to break in new brain cells our- 
selves, and also help arouse new loyalties in others perhaps not as well 
prepared as we are to meet these changes. 

To our membership we give the assurance that just as soon as author- 
ized plans are released regarding the place and part women are to have 
in the new church, the information will be widely circulated through 
"Woman's Home Missions," letters, and other sources. In addition, we 
plan to have many of our national leaders go into the conferences to 
give the necessary help in orienting to the changed conditions. Women, 
let us not take counsel with our fears. Rather, let us face the future 
joyously: 

"Why shouldst thou fill today with sorrow 
About tomorrow. 
My heart? 

God watcheth all with care most true; 
Doubt not that He will give thee, too 
Thy part. (Paul Fleming.) 

The theme for this year, "New Horizons," was chosen by the Forward- 
Looking Committee in anticipation of forthcoming changes. Included in 
the Study Course is a resume of the organizational activities of our Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and our sister denominations, so that to the 
last auxiliary our membership might be better informed regarding women's 
work throughout Methodism. In the interests of furthering fellowship and 



Report of Corresponding Secretary. 89 

better understanding of the work of these sister churches, we recommend 
visitation among their groups by our home missionary women, and where 
possible, an exchange of speakers at district and conference meetings. 
Our major promotional project, Leadership Education, has been planned 
that we might present to the new Methodist Church a better-trained and 
more devoted leadership. 

The Sixtieth Anniversary 

We are launching plans for our sixtieth anniversary, seeing in the 
gjoals of 

$60,000 for a new building at George O. Robinson, Puerto Rico, 
60,000 new members, 
60,000 subscribers to "Woman's Home Missions," and 

6 per cent increase in subscriptions to "Junior Neighbors," 
a stirring challenge to strengthen Woman's Home Missionary Society work 
along all lines. Concerning the membership goal, which in a peculiar sense 
is the responsibility of every individual member, it should be said there 
are still vast possibilities for increasing membership. With more than 
two million and a half Methodist lay women over fourteen years of age in 
our branch of the church, and less than 250,000 women and girls of this 
age group in the membership of this Society, there should be no difficulty 
in reaching and even exceeding our quota if each member will work en- 
thusiastically to secure new members. We i-e-emphasize the New Loyalty 
plan as a helpful device because it requires personal work on the part of 
each one who enrolls. 

Even though changes in our organizational setup should occur before 
we celebrate our sixtieth anniversary, let us undertake these goals with 
new loyalty and renewed enthusiasm. The event will be none the less 
significant, and the need for achieving these definite objectives no less 
lu'gent even if we are a united church by 1940. 

"Up, This Is the Day!" 

We grant that it is not easy to surrender our present methods of doing 
our work, or to broaden our scope of interest; and harder still, perhaps, 
to root out our prejudices (and haven't we each a few we cherish?). De- 
spite obstacles, we shall go forward. The Methodist Church has always 
found its missionary women ready to undertake their responsibilities. 
It is depending upon us now to measure up to the new opportunities which, 
please God, will not lessen but increase in the united church. Remember 
those lines of Tennyson: 

"The old order changeth, yielding place to new. 
And God fulfills Himself in many ways 
Lest one good custom should corrupt the world." 

Florence Kelly, the outstanding leader in the field of social service, 
had occasion once to listen to several addresses on the accomplishments 
of an organization in which she was actively interested. When her turn 
came to speak, she said: "I want to remind you of the things that have not 
been done." So today I would remind you of our unfinished task. For 
shame if we for a moment think we can rest upon our past laurels! More 
shame to us if we mourn the passing of old plans and cherished methods 
and are unwilling to undertake the new and untried way! 

Surely the providence of God has brought us to the threshold of these 
greater opportunities of service. Then in the spirit of Deborah of old, 
let us lift a clarion call to the womanhood of Methodism: "Up, this is 
the day!" The day when women from the North, South, East, and West, 
with different but distinctive cultures and religious backgrounds, will 
blend their talents and spiritual gifts in a new program of service for the 
kingdom of God. Women, what we need right now is to be shaken out of 
our complacency; to be stirred to greater believing, to keener caring, to 



90 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



braver thinking, to more creative action. We need greater confidence 
that there are new heights we must scale in missionary service and new 
spiritual resoui'ces available for the doing. 

We shall face many complex problems in accomplishing organic union. 
Nevertheless, the things which we now have in common far outweigh our 
differences, and in spiritual objectives we are already united. The problems 
which confront our sister organizations in promoting missionary activi- 
ties are quite similar to those with which we have struggled through 
the years. As we become better acquainted with their methods and 
activities, we find they have faced the same diffieulties we have in enlist- 
ing the womanhood of Methodism in missions. They long ago set out 
as we did with the high objective of organizing a missionary society in 
every church, with every woman a member. This unfinished task awaits 
the united Methodist womanhood. 

Can we by any stretch of the imagination envisage the strength and 
invincible power four million or more Methodist women in these United 
States might be if banded together in a common cause? This is a glori- 
ous dream and 

"He whom a dream hath possessed treads the impalpable marches, 
From the dust of a long day's road he leaps to a laughing star 
And rides God's battlefield in a flaming and golden. car." 

This dream of service for Methodist women is possible of achievement 
if we will exercise our spiritual imagination; if we will dare to leave the 
beaten path and blaze new trails. "This is the victory that overcometh 
the world, even our faith" (1 John 5. 4). 

Up, Methodist women! This is the day of days! 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARIES 





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117 


3,420 


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369 


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311 


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4,291 


63 


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2,896 


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2,211 


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15 


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9,049 




23 
107 

16 

122 

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90 
143 


160 
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2.303 

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390 
4,336 
2,887 
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231 

212 

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2,673 

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4 
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51 
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58 
496 

57 
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153 
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13 
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81 
101 


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2,084 

1,282 

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Report of Corresponding Secretary. 91 

STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE CORRESPONDING SECRETARIES 





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339 

3.372 


2 


22 






8 
11 
194 


'■■5 

6 


325 

408 

4.018 


12 
5 

72 


81 

58 
815 


21 

19 

115 


121 

229 
2,062 


527 






53 

182 


695 


North Indiana 


13 


264 


15 


6.895 


North-East Ohio , . 


225 


7.788 


42 


841 


8 


241 


760 


35 


9.665 


133 


1,983 


209 


3,686 


15.334 


Northern Minnesota 


47 


1.199 


16 


300H 


5 


121 


63 


10 


1.693>i 


36 


482 


31 


556 


2.731H 




81 
79 


1.736 
2.249 


5 
fi 


152 

47 






56 
45 


7 
5 


1,951 
2,433 


61 
42 


714 
388 


27 
76 


578 
1.119 


3.243 


Northwest Indiana ... 


5 


87 


3.940 




85 


2.107 


7 


115 


1 


25 


21 


14 


2.282 


55 


467 


59 


665 


3.414 




36 

285 


742 
10.826 










28 
709 


5 
23 


775 
12,843 


9 
156 


162 
2,007 


17 

269 


298 
4,901 


1,235 


Ohio 


31 


748 


27 


.537 


19,751 


Oklahoma 


61 


1.527 


4 


67 


14 


208 


75 


17 


1,894 


39 


399 


40 


778 


3,071 


Oregon 


41 


1.040 


2 


6 


6 


59 


20 


3 


1,128 


11 


123 


29 


367 


1,618 


Pacific-Northwest. . . . - 


65 


2,030 


2 


23 


9 


142 


52 




2,247 


27 


356 


47 


788 


3,391 


Philadelphia 


153 


5.648 


31 


654 


1 


31 


258 


11 


6,602 


75 


1,107 


56 


1.002 


8,711 


Pittsburgh •. 


128 


4,621 


37 


887 


1 


21 


133 




5,662 


86 


1,028 


109 


3.342 


10.032 


Rock River..- ; 


131 


5.198 


39 


770 


20 


455 


574 


37 


7,034 


94 


1,243 


113 


1.914 


10.191 


Saint Johns River 


22 


585 


1 


11 


3 


37 


29 


21 


683 


7 


96 


6 


101 


880 




16 

53 

6 

20 


113 

250 

23 

319 












3 


116 

277 

23 

398 


4 
15 


33 
166 


6 
18 

1 
11 


44 

109 

8 

192 


193 




1 








27 


552 










31 


Southern 


1 


23 


1 


11 


45 




7 


47 


637 


Southern California . 


169 


7.145 


21 


320 


18 


304 


393 


28 


8,190 


94 


1,238 


115 


3.452 


12.883 


Southern Illinois 


66 


1,835 


9 


258 


5 


80 


103 


65 


2.341 


36 


477 


57 


1.056 


3,874 




9 
92 


50 
2.734 














50 
3.216 


2 
66 


28 
552 


12 
105 


108 
1,823 


186 


Southwest Kansas. .' 


2 


61 


14 


246 


162 


13 


5,591 




11 
65 
101 


50 

335 

2.517 










2 

38 
106 


..... 
19 


52 

387 
2,839 






4 

18 
22 


20 

99 

314 


72 




1 

12 


6 
117 






15 
39 


54 
367 


540 


Troy 




80 


3,520 


Upper Iowa 


60 


1.728 


2 


39 




118 


56 


28 


1,969 


25 


312 


37 


544 


2.825 


Upper Mississippi 


6 


83 














83 


5 


42 


6 


40 


165 


5 

26 
29 
67 
69 
4? 


60 
442 
383 
272 
1,920 
707 














60 
503 
469 
361 
2,328 
810 


7 
9 
9 
23 
56 
9 


61 
75 
82 
100 
605 
82 


4 
16 
21 

5 
40 
24 


.39 
211 
242 
50 
796 
254 


160 










25 


24 
13 
15 

75 

18 


12 

15 

..... 

16 


789 


Washington 

West Texas 


3 
11 
15 

1 


58 

74 

332 

27 


793 






511 








3.729 






42 


1.146 




50 
45 


1,594 
1,211 


5 
4 


142 
51 






64 
49 


1 
16 


1.801 
1.382 


13 

14 


117 
209 


21 
25 


379 
307 


2,297 






55 


1,898 


Wyoming 


111 


3,809 


26 


722 




15 


230 


3 


4.779 


86 


1.321 


85 


2.120 


8,220 


Wyoming State 


9 


147 










5 




152 


1 


14 


2 


9 












Totals 


5.283 


143.883 


659 


13,121>^ 


363 


6.143 


7,483 


1.016 


171,646>^ 


2,662 


31.566 


3.411 


59,894 


263,106>^ 



Subscriptions reported by Publisher: 

Woman's Home Missions 50,338 

Junior Neighbors 21.406 



Annual Report of the Treasurer 



Mrs. J. H. Freeman 



TN bringing this report today, I have to say that the results have 
meant anxiety and really great exertion on the part of our constituency, 
else these totals of figures could not show such magnificent returns. And 
I am certain that our women know that whoever works for humanity 
cannot despair of the benevolence of the Father, for His love and goodness 
are with us always. In trying to rightly serve the present age, we find 
that even our thinking along many lines of accepted conclusions must 
change and has changed. 

We have considered America as a Christian nation for a long time, but 
we are discovering that we have not as much to give to the nations of the 
world as we had deluded ourselves into thinking. The gospel of our Lord 
Christ is "good news" to all peoples, but we cannot say that we have 
accepted this "good news" and that we have fully tried it in this Christian 
America and find it good. How far we are from this — but we rejoice that 
in serving the present age and in holding a vital interest in the life of 
today we are helping to shape the certain tomorrows. We have challenging 
opportunities for service, and we are living in days of exceptional privi- 
leges, but we can so live on the surface of things that the pangs of the 
world's pain never strike deeply within us. We seem to fail to get be- 
neath the burdens and the inequalities of life due to our human selfishness, 
prejudice, and a false racial superiority complex. The growth of the 
Kingdom demands Christians of wide horizons. 

Because we are living in these unusual times there is danger that our 
overanxiety and our perplexing problems may seem almost incapable of 
being solved, and we may even conclude that we cannot cope with the 
forces which are so tremendous, that we falter and do not meet the needs. 
The Christian people of America are responsible citizens and dare not 
overlook the fact that our greatest asset is the youth of our land. If 
one half of our one hundred thirty million people are under twenty-six 
years of age, how great, how large is our task. These youth and chil- 
dren are the hope of the future; but the answer is not in the future, but 
now. I rejoice that our great organization is bettering the lives of thou- 
sands of young people who might, but for our schools, settlements, and 
various forms of service, remain regrettable liabilities, and there is some- 
thing more for the Christian people to do than to rest upon the thought 
that "So long Thy power hath blest us — sure it will lead us on." My 
thought is that in such a time as this Christian people should become 
vitally aggressive in all that pertains to preparing the youth of our land 
to make a better country than we have succeeded in doing. Our indiffer- 
ence, luke-warmness, and really our smugness have failed to bring about 
many changes for which we are responsible. Jesus wai'ned His followers 
that the time would come when they must fight, for He said: "Think not 
I have come to send peace on earth; I came not to send peace, but a sword." 

92 



Report of Treasurer. 93 

"For Love of Christ and in His Name" we should bestir ourselves and our 
constituency to action concerning the strange ways of thinking on certain 
moral questions which do not lift humanity to a higher plane of welfare 
and happiness. There never has been a time like the present when each 
Christian woman should do her part, else the great upward trend of 
civilization is being lost to our generation. With Divine help we may 
yet tap unimagined sources of wisdom and strength to match the influence 
of spiritual wickedness. 

We do not belong to those who are grasping for the impossible, but 
we do know that when we pray that His Kingdom may come on earth, we 
may by our own conduct retard the fulfillment of the teachings of our 
Saviour, Jesus Christ. We wonder if those of us who have named the 
Name which is above every name, do not many times retard the bringing 
about of His will. The great Wesleyan movement really saved England 
from certain revolution, and would surely lift this nation above the 
dangers which seem all about us today. John saw that marvelous vision 
in which "The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord 
and His Christ." We may hasten that day, for we have our part to 
perform in this great task. Of course, we are limited to human under- 
standing, and we are heirs to prejudices and fixed ideas which have attached 
themselves sometimes to our hearts and minds over the years. The finished 
human product in us, as we stand here today, may be something very 
different from the half-finished product of a young man or young woman 
who, under different and strange social and economic conditions, is only 
half-finished up to the present. The same thought might apply with 
equal strength to half-finished economics and social philosophies — philos- 
ophies which may seem very strange and ugly. But we have before us in 
all our human limitations what seems to be the clear example of our 
Lord's tolerance so clearly implied as His unyielding and uncompromising 
stand against evil. It seems we can best serve the present and exert 
a sweeping influence by the simple acceptance of this magic combination 
of unyielding strength plus human love and tolerance toward those who 
err. Christianity would never have been brought to us if Christ's followers 
had been cowards. The prophets of the Lord went into strange and dark 
places, but they came out again and stronger than ever. 

We have lost our first engagement for Prohibition, although our task 
is to teach and train the youth of our land, but I dare say that there are 
many hundreds of thousands of people who, lacking understanding, were 
not with us then, but will be with us in the next engagement. 

Will the kingdoms of this world become the kingdoms of our Lord when 
the church must beg? Much is being printed these days about America's 
income. No one knows just how large it will be this year (1938), but 
statisticians figure perhaps one hundred twenty-five billions, or more than 
three times our national debt. If just Christians only should believe that 
the "Earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof," would not the dignity 
which our visible church occupies in our wayward hearts be upheld, rather 
than as a suppliant crouching in the byways? Should we not take a 
stand against our own inertia in the matter of paying our vows for the 
sake of the Kingdom ? 

Because of Unification, toward which we are all looking and preparing, 
we have tried to reach a common ground in our terminology for comparison 
and study with the reports of the missionary organizations of the other 
churches which will be merged with our church. We have also endeavored 
to learn just what is our total financial responsibility for our work and just 
what it costs to conduct our institutions. We have not received all of 
the funds for all of our conference institutions, nor all of the funds ex- 
pended in our national institutions. I am sure that you fully understand 
that if we own and operate institutions, we are responsible for the entire 
budget which it takes to carry on the work in these specific institutions. 

Our auditor says: "If you have not considered that — the simple proof 
of our responsibility comes when an institution gets into trouble and 



94 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

you may be certain that it will, then, like an injured child, run crying 
to its mother." We have learned through the national institutional audited 
reports that $751,597.53 of such items do not appear on the books of the 
national treasurer, and for this reason our auditor has checked these 
items for our information. I shall give you his statement of this cost: 

To and for the work direct $r,244,408 49 

Mostly administrative 19,035 85 



Total $1,263,444 34 

Excess of local activity results expended and reported :, 

by institutions over what went through Treasurer's 

books $751,957 53 

Raised and expended through conference activities — 

not otherwise included 217,572 65 

Gift in securities used in building and for endowment 

not otherwise included 25,000 00 

Total $2,257,974 52 

These figures tell their own story, but do not cover all by any means. 

We have experienced an unusual year because of the recession, which 
"has affected all parts of our country, and calamities have been experienced 
that are beyond description in many sections, and yet in the face of all of 
these handicaps, I believe I have never seen our women so anxious and will- 
.jng to bring their year's totals up to the obligations taken. During this year 
1937-38 many conferences which nevej; haye reported in all departments of 
the work have done so. 

I am happy to tell you that there has been an increase over 1936-37 in 
General Fund. You will recall that we stressed the necessity of holding 
up our General Fund and salaries because of our obligations toward salaries 
in our institutions. Even with some increases we are not paying what we 
must pay to be on the same basis with other missionary boards of our church, 
and of those organizations which will merge with us. Emphasize Thank 
OflFering, which will help in placing our missionaries on an ethical and fair 
basis. 

Current Expense Funds are less this year. We only received $224,962.13, 
but last year we received $237,711.35. I have called attention for a number 
of years to the fact that more funds ai-e expended in the upkeep of our 
conference institutions than we allow for our national work. We know 
that administrative funds are included in the conference totals, but even 
that is several thousands from reaching the l-ow figure for national Current 
Expense. 

Bequests received are $39,968.17. 

Funds from Annuity Contracts are $38,960. Last year we received $71,- 
110. There is no question in my mind but that all annuity contracts accepted 
by all of the boards of the various churches will be treated as- sacred trusts, 
and yet there has been hesitation on the part of some just at this time, for 
they desire to know more of what unification will mean in the United Church. 
I am certain that these transactions will have just as careful oversight as 
we now give to them. 

We are facing a building campaign of great importance and we cannot 
quite turn over the records of this organization until this uncompleted task 
is finished. East St. Louis, which is the final building for Girls' Golden 
Year, will be completed in a short time. This work has been delayed 
because of the difficulty in getting a clear title to the lots purchased. We 
rejoice that the amount received during the fiscal year 1937-38 toward 
"Building" has completed our jDj)ligation to,th|Lt.jaeedy piece, of ;Work,^; ■;,. 



Report of Treasurer. 95 

We are stressing the necessity for the new building in Puerto Rico, and 
our gifts and bequests throughout the conferences should be directed toward 
this project. While we asked all conferences for pledges toward this Sixtieth 
Anniversary project, we must devote another year to raising the funds, for 
the pledges accepted by the conferences reached about half of our goal, 
which is $60,000. We shall rejoice if these pledges may all be accepted on 
next Monday evening. 

All other buildings have been completed, or the finances have been ar- 
ranged for, in our building campaign, which covered Girls' Golden Year 
projects and also the Navajo School Building, and our only financial obli- 
gation is for the Puerto Rico Building. 

Through the continued generosity of our good friends, Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Pfeiffer, an administration building at Ethel Harpst Home is now 
under way and will be completed during the present fiscal year. In addition 
to that generous gift, a residence for the superintendent of the institution 
is also being erected. They have also continued their generous gift to 
Bennett College, at which place the erection of the new $100,000 library 
building is under way, and it will be occupied some time this year. This 
building is made possible through their combined generosity and that of 
the General Education Board and the matching of the cost of this building 
toward the endowment at Bennett College. 

We regret that Mrs. Pfeiffer cannot be with us at this Annual Meeting, 
but I know that we are all thinking of her because of her responsibilities 
in her home at this time. For these generous gifts we all say, thank you 
from the bottom of our hearts. I have several times said to this dear friend: 
"You have come for such a time as this. It is providential that you are 
with us." 

Finance Methods 

The special offerings which are cared for by the chairmen of Finance 
Methods should not be overlooked, for the amounts that are brought in by 
these active women are a large proportion of the income for the upkeep of 
our work. Each secretary writes that she is receiving reports from more 
conferences than ever before. There are no exceptions to this, and the sec- 
retaries have written of the reports from each conference, which shows that 
our women in the conferences, also, are looking after this work in a con- 
scientious and careful way. 

"Not failure, but low aim is crime." 



Receipts 

Cash Receipts $2,200,301 68 

Supplies as reported 1 19,496 27 

$2 319 797 95 
Cash Balance, August 1, 1937 ' 17',986 17 



$2,337,784 12 



Disbursements 

Disbursements $2,187,198 62 

Supplies .. 119.496 27 

$2,306,694 89 
Cash Balance, August 1, 1938. , 31,089 23 

^■ ' ■ • $2,337,784 12 

•Value 'of builditigs-^Ena grounds $9,646,455 18 



96 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

I think the following was written by one of the deaconesses in our Train- 
ing School, and is my message to our great band of workers: 

Reprimand 

Suddenly^ one day, I found myself 

Just outside heaven's portal gate. 

So close I heard the rustle of the angels' wings. 

The murmur of the happy voices of my friends, 

And smelled the fragrance of eternal bloom. 

I whispered, "Lord, my time has come. 

My bungling work on earth is o'er. 

In gladness I will enter in and rest 

If Thou wilt but swing wide the door." 

The gate stood closed. I could not see my Lord, 

But gently came His voice: "Not yet, my child; 

Go back on earth and work a while. 

With harvests white on every side 

Woulds't shirk thy task because thou art tired?" 

Let us go to our homes resolved to do more and better work for the 
Kingdom than ever before. 



Auditor's Certificate 

September 15, 1938. 

Auditors' Certificate, 1937-38 

Treasury Committee, , 

Woman's Home Missionary Society, 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mesdames: 

Our audit of your books and records having been completed for the fiscal 
year 1937-38, we report that our accounting rendered to the Board of Trus- 
tees, contains the following principal statements of information, supple- 
mented by several statements of detail: 

Statement 1 — Summaries of Cash. 

Statement 2 — Cash Receipts. 

Statement 3 — Cash Disbursements. 

Statement 4 — Homes' and Schools' Fund. 

Statement 5— Assets and Liabilities, end of year. 

Certificate 

All cash shown as having been received during the year was found to 
have been deposited intact in the bank. All cash disbursed was supported 
by canceled checks and other evidence. All cash balances shown at the end 
of the year were properly reconciled by us with bank records. 

All investments shown were examined physically or otherwise properly 
accounted for. 

In general, we found the affairs of the Treasurer's office to have been 
looked after in the usual competent and conscientious manner. 

WE DO HEREBY CERTIFY that, to the best of our knowledge and 
belief, the statements submitted containing information concerning the 
affairs of your Society do, truly, represent what they purport to represent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LANE STEPHENS AND COMPANY, 
Auditors and Management Consultants. 



Report of Treasurer. 97 

What It Cost to Run Institutions and Work, 1937-38 

(a) Cash disbursements — Statement 3. 

Subhead 1— To and for the work direct. . .$1,244,408 49 

2 — Mostly administrative 19,035 85 

$1,263,444 34 

(Does not include subhead 3.) 

(b) Excess of local activity results expended — reported by 

institutions — over what went through Treasurer's 

books 751,957 53 

(c) Raised and expended through conference activities — not 

otherwise included 217,572 65 

(d) Gift in securities used in building — not otherwise included 25,000 00 

Total $2,257,974 52 

Summaries, 1937-38 

Balance in regular checking accounts, August 1, 1937 $17,986 17 

Add: Cash Receipts, per Statement 2 2,200,301 68 

$2,218,287 85 
Less: Cash Disbursements, per Statement 3 2,187,198 62 

Balance in regular checking accounts, July 31, 1938 $31,089 23 

Regular checking account $30,692 99 

Payroll account 396 24 



$31,089 23 
Cash Receipts, 1937-38 

1. From and through the field and workers — 

Designated for General Fund $215,505 56 

Designated for salaries 111,940 53 

Lenten oflPering 22,478 09 

Designated for Permanent Missionary Fund. 3,253 68 

Perpetual memberships 9,890 00 

Designated for Building Fund 125,186 75 

Designated as Little B. & S. Fund 11,777 01 

Designated as Student Aid and C. E 224,962 13 

Designated as Conference Building Fund. . . . 10,289 37 

Designated as conference salaries 28,095 25 

Designated as conference current expense.. . 240,910 95 

Designated as conference supplies 17,046 67 

Designated as silver and linen money 4,875 95 

From H. & S.— Local activities 223,721 15 

Bequests and endowments received 68,726 26 

Annuities principal received 38,960 00 

Miscellaneous received 35,563 81 

Refunds and publication receipts 9,815 00 

Conference help on promotional work 1,491 12 

$1,404,489 28 

Interest earned on investments 80,877 69 

Deaconess assessments — emergency relief 2.420 00 

Missionary assessments, net 651 02 

Rents received 393 17 

Profits on bonds sold 18,030 83 

From sale of Society property 12,771 55 

Miscellaneous receipts 80 00 

Sub-total $1,519,713 54 

Proceeds from investments sold or cashed in 676,570 64 

Farm loans paid in 4,017 50 

Total receipts $2,200,301 68 

4 



98 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Cash Disbursements, 1937-38 
1. To and for the work direct — 

Building and plant improvements $164,336 57 

Emergency Fund 18,089 39 

Interest (including interest acci'ued on new 

bonds) (qualification) 5,604 20 

Interest — trust funds 3,552 34 

Insurance 5,896 61 

Building debts and special needs from Little 

B. & S 4,390 00 

For migrant work 2,800 00 

Missionary and deaconess travel 3,019 93 

Salaries 207,276 28 

Student Aid and current expense 212,119 78 

Silver and linen 3,672 52 

Taxes on institutions, net 5,554 26 

Salary of chaplain. Hospital 66 1.800 00 

Ellis Island and Navy Yard 826 00 

Conference Building Fund 10,289 37 

Conference salaries 28,095 25 

Conference current expense 240,910 95 

Local activities — results expended 223,721 15 

Conference supplies funds expended 17,177 94 

Perpetual membership dues used in work. . . . 20,604 00 

Rent — Cincinnati headquarters 2,520 00 

Salaries of editors, publisher, and assistants . 9,409 00 

Printing— leaflets, etc 6,357 28 

Slides 200 00 

San Francisco office expense 943 00 

Salaries and expense — promotional work. . . . 5,258 40 

Schools of Missions 420 00 

Student work 208 49 

Junior — office expense 278 18 

Young people — office expense 621 74 

Wesleyan Service Guild 1,000 00 

Expense of standing committees and co- 
operative enterprises of Managers and 

Trustees 4,065 29 

Deaconess secretary — allowance and expense 2,247 11 

Education secretary — salary and expense . . . 3,090 00 

Expense of Bureau secretaries 3,420 84 

Expense of annual meeting 8,385 60 

Bequest money sent to work 16,247 02 



Mostly administrative 

Corresponding secretary — salaries and ex- 
pense $3,675 00 

Ti-easurer — salaries and expense 7,080 00 

Recording secretary — salaries and expense. . 488 44 

Quartei-ly meeting — Board of Trustees 2,264 42 

Audit fees and expense 750 00 

Investment counsel, etc 150 75 

Legal expense 3,241 61 

Executive travel and expense 1,385 63 



Other- 
Annuities sent to annuitants $53,910 04 

Paid out for Pension and Relief Funds — 

Board of H. H. & D 871 20 

Retired missionaries 9,559 37 

Deaconess relief 5^700 00 



$1,244,408 49 



19,035 85 



Report of Treasurer. 99 

Life insurance premiums 6,977 86 

Expense of farms owned or for mortgage 

protection 2,016 68 

Bequest money, interest and refunds sent to 

Homes and Schools Fund 40,660 45 

Money used to buy new investments 800,752 26 

Miscellaneous 3,306 42 

923,754 28 



Total disbursements $2,187,198 62 

HOMES AND SCHOOLS FUND— 1937-38 

Balance, August 1, 1937 $62,540 36 

Deposits — 

January — 

Taylor Bequest $1,169 76 

Kerkoff 250 00 

Keeney 1,000 00 

Miller 75 00 

Keefer 26 75 

Sanford 175 86 

Billing 500 00 

July — 

Thompson 619 76 

Deamind 393 65 

Cubbison 1,000 00 

Calkins 1,110 02 

Wake 135 00 

Crowell 4,752 37 

Allen 500 00 

Wood 20 29 

Seymour 177 29 

Osborn 75 00 

Stout 250 00 

Keefer 26 11 

Kerkhoff 9 45 

Barge 1,114 25 

Hamilton 1,000 00 

Satchell 250 00 

Ferguson 25,000 00 

Pac. N. W. Conf. Loan payment 100 00 

39,730 56 

Interest — 

January $676 00 

December 210 12 

July 194 76 

July 25 50 

July 33 63 

June 307 90 

1,447 91 



Refunds collected— Mrs. J. H. F. refund on loan 25,000 00 



$128,718 83 



Less: August — 

Mrs. J. H. F., Treas. Loan to check, ac. . $25,000 00 

Mrs. J. H. F., for truck 900 00 

Mrs. J. H. F., Hatten's furniture 300 00 

Mrs. J. H. F., Campbell repairs 300 00 

Mrs. J. H. F., Navajo building 6,404 52 

Mrs. J. H. F., Browning sewers 1,122 30 

Mrs. J. H. F., Robinson repairs 1,500 00 



100 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Mrs. J. H. F., Brewster repairs 11,000 00 

Mrs. J. H. F., Pfeiffer equipment 500 00 

48,626 82 

Balance, July 31, 1938 $80,092 01 

NATIONAL SOCIETY ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AS AT JULY 31, 1938 

Assets — 

Cash— General account $30,692 99 

Payroll account 396 24 

Homes and Schools Fund 80,092 01 

$111,181 24 

Investments (Schedule 1) — 

Bonds, etc $1,868,395 38 

U. S. A. Farm Loan Bonds 32,200 00 

Certificates of Indebtedness 40,000 00 

Misc. stocks, etc., carried as investments. . 16,017 77 
Farm mortgages and farm lands ov^^ned. . . . 173,820 69 

2,130,433 84 

* Buildings, Grounds, and Equipment (Schedule 2) — 

As reported by various institutions $7,946,455 18 

Less: Debt as tabulated (Note 1) 270,000 00 

7,676,455 18 

*Deaconess institutions — property and furnishings value — 

As reported $813,595 97 

Less: Debt as tabulated 33,425 00 

■ 780,170 97 

Total $10,698,241 23 

Liabilities — 

In addition to those noted above NONE 

Note 1 — There is no indebtedness represented by notes signed by the 
national Treasurer. 

Note 2 — Annuities outstanding on w^hich the Society is obligated to 
pay interest, and at vai-ying rates of interest during the lifetime of the 
annuitants, amount to $935,354.44 in principal. 

'^These figures do not include confei'ence institutions. 

Conference institutions valuations, as reported in 1935, 

plus later additions, were '$1,558,967 15 

Net value, buildings, grounds, and equipment, above.... 7,676,455 18 

Net value, deaconess institutions, above 780,170 97 

Grand total, net value in excess of debt, W. H. M. S. 

institutions $10,015,593 30 



SCHEDULE 1 
SUMMARY OF INVESTMENTS— JULY 31, 1938 

Total Trust General 

Cost Funds Annuities Fund 

Bonds, etc. (Detail 1) $1,868,395 38 $921,438 83 $932,945 31 $14,01124 

Misc. Items (Detail 6) 16,017 77 11,517 77 3,90000 600 00 

Farm Mortgages (Detail 7). *206,020 69 157,812 43 27,542 46 20,665 80 
Certs, of Deposit (Detail 5). 40,000 00 40,000 00 

$2,130,433 84 $1,130,769 03 $964,387 77 $35,277 04 



♦This does not take into account bonds sold at a profit, totaling $18,030.83 



Report of Treasurer. 101 

Summary — Proof 

Balance, August 1, 1937 $2,077,440 64 

Add: 

New Purchases of bonds and stocks, at cost. . . $735,752 26 



Direct gifts of securities, book value 25,000 00 

Purchases, certificates of deposit 65 ,000 00 



825,752 26 
1,903,192 90 



Less: 



Cash proceeds, bonds sold $626,070 64 

Cash proceeds, certs, of deposit. . 50,000 00 

Cash proceeds, mortgages 4,017 50 

Cash proceeds, misc. items 500 00 



Losses taken on books: 

From cost value, mortgages (and adj.). . $4,432 50 
From cost value, bonds, etc *87 , 738 42 



,588 14 



92,170 92 

772,759 06 



Balance, July 31, 1938 $2,130,433 84 



ANNUITIES RECEIVED 

A Friend 4.6% $1,000 00 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A, Bassett 5.7 1,000 00 

Mrs. Helen I. Benson 8.0 1,000 00 

Mrs. Olive Stanley Bower 5.9 500 00 

Mrs. Annie Alice Boyington 5.3 3,000 00 

A Friend 5.4 2,000 00 

Victor I. and Ruth S. Clark 5.8 500 00 

Mrs. Florence M. Collins 8.0 500 00 

Floretta L. Damon 5.9 1,000 00 

Miss Mary Denniston 6.0 1,000 00 

Dr. Julia M. Donahue 6.3 1,000 00 

Miss Emily Fruitiger 4.8 100 00 

Edw. J. and Glennie Weston Fuller 4.6 5,000 00 

Rev. J. E. Jacklin and Miss Flora Jacklin 3.0 2,500 00 

Miss Laura Jacoby 8.0 500 00 

Mrs. Grace H. Jull 5.6 2,000 00 

Mrs. Emma S. Kehn 5.8 2,000 00 

Mrs. H. G. Leonard 6.5 500 00 

Miss Grace H. Lygrisse 4.0 500 00 

Miss Grace H. Lygrisse 4.0 500 00 

A Friend 3.2 500 00 

Mrs. Emma G. Owen 6.3 100 00 

Miss Ethel Christina Payne 4.8 1,000 00 

Frank C. and Hannah A. Richardson 5.2 500 00 

Mrs. J. N. Ryker and Miss Carrie Bray. . 5.0 200 00 

Mrs. J. W. Schreiner 10 00 

Mrs. Elmyra Schofield Smith 6.0 500 00 

Mrs. Ida E. Stevenson 8.0 500 00 

Mrs. Emilia Thomson 6.5 2,000 00 

A Friend 8.0 100 00 

Dr. Irving C. and Mrs. M. Wood 4.0 3,000 00 



102 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Miss Kate Frazier — Real Estate 5.0 

Mr. Jacob D. Merner — Stock 6.1 

Conference 

Mrs. Augusta Browning 8.0 

Mrs. Emma R. M. Herr 6.6 

Mrs. L. D. LeBard 7.3 

Mrs. T. C. McQuate 6.5 

Mrs. E. P. Mundy 5.3 

Laura Ward McCIary 6.2 

Mrs. Dora Stephenson 8.0 

Total $45,460 00 

Summary — Proof 

Balance outstanding, August 1, 1937 $904,994 44 



1,500 


00 


5,000 


00 


100 


00 


500 


00 


500 


00 


100 


00 


2,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


250 


00 



Plus: New annuities— Cash $38,960 00 

Other 6,500 00 



45,460 00 



Less: Released through demise $14,100 00 

Released through transfer 1,000 00 



$950,454 44 



15,100 00 

Balance outstanding, July 31, 1938 $935,354 44 

SCHEDULE 4 
BEQUESTS RECEIVED, 1937-38 



Received 

Allen $500 00 

Bean (for invest.) 1,435 29 

Brooks 100 00 

Calkins 1,110 02 

Cobb (Bldg.) 1,000 00 

Craig 1,045 00 

Coolenan (for invest.) 1,000 00 

Cubbison 1,000 00 

Cochran (Bldg.) 500 00 

Crowell 4,752 



Dodge (Bldg.) 

DeMaris 

Deamud 

Emery, Erie, and Aiken. 
Emgart (Perp. Mem.) 



100 
500 
393 
250 



60 00 



Ferguson 25,000 00 

Gage 630 00 

Goodman 465 00 

Huffington 235 78 

Haggart (Perp. Mem.") 450 00 

Johnston (Perp. Mem.) 30 00 

Kerkhoff 250 00 

Keeney 1,000 00 

Keef er 52 86 

Kellar— Campbell & Marcy. 1,000 00 

Kyle 500 00 

Kuntz 3,002 02 

150 00 
171 76 
400 00 

100 00 



Miller 

McCrum (for invest.) . 

Murray 

Norton (Perp. Mem. 
Freeman CI.) 



and 



Confer- Desig- Undesig- 
ence nated nated 

$500 00 

$1,435 29 

$100 00 

1,110 02 

1,000 00 

1,045 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

4,752 37 

100 00 

500 00 

393 65 

250 00 

60 00 

25,000 00 

630 00 

465 00 

235 78 

450 00 

30 00 

250 00 

1,000 00 

52 86 

1,000 00 

500 00 

3,002 02 

150 00 

171 76 

400 00 

100 00 



Report of Treasurer. 103 

Norris— Wood, Jr 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Osborn 75 00 75 00 

Philpot (Perp. Mem.) 100 00 100 00 

Parker (for invest.) 300 00 300 00 

Quniby 200 00 200 00 

Strina, Bancroft 97 10 97 10 

Sanford 175 00 175 86 

Shand, Bancroft 500 00 200 00 300 00 

Stout 250 00 250 00 

Sutcliff, Campbell 500 00 500 00 

Strong 6,000 00 6,000 00 

Seymour 177 29 177 29 

Taylor 1,169 76 1,169 76 

Taylor 85 24 85 24 

Thompson 619 76 619 76 

Watts (for invest.) 10,000 00 10,000 00 

Wakes 135 00 135 00 

Wood 2 50 2 50 

No name — Freeman Clinic. 155 00 155 00 



$68,726 26 $12,812 80 $19,099 39 $36,814 07 

Disposition Disposition 

Mrs. Duncan, Treas $100 00 $100 00 

Mrs. Plate, Treas 1,045 00 1,045 00 

Mrs. Artis, Treas 235 78 235 78 

Mrs. Stewart, Secy 609 10 609 10 

Mrs. Kip, Treas 782 30 782 30 

M. C. Slutes 400 00 400 00 

Mrs. Sisson, Treas 500 00 500 00 

Mrs. Sisson, Treas 6,000 00 6,000 00 

Mrs. Travis, Secy 500 00 500 00 

Mrs. Meidenbauer, Treas. . . 200 00 200 00 

Gary Office Equipment 249 75 249 75 

Mrs. Stewart, Secy 860 37 860 37 

Mrs. Kip, Treas 2,219 72 2,219 72 

Mrs. Osborn, Secy 150 00 150 00 

Mrs. Meeks, Secy 115 00 115 00 

Mrs. Keith, Treas 200 00 200 00 

Mrs. Edmonds, Treas 400 00 400 00 

Mrs. Sickler, Treas 500 00 500 00 

Mrs. Lowther, Treas 630 00 630 00 

Miss Robinson, Secy 50 00 50 00 

M. C. Slutes 500 00 500 00 



$16,247 02 $12,812 80 3,434 22 



Summary, 1937-38 

Received, per list $68,726 26 

Real Estate sold— Billings Beq 500 00 

Holding in Treasury, 1937 5,594 58 

Sent to Conferences $12,812 80 

Sent to Bureaus 3,434 22 

Sent to Homes and Schools Fund 39,630 56 

Invested 13,647 05 

Bequests for Miller and Wood (furn.) 650 00 

Holding in Treasury, 1938 4,646 21 



$74,820 84 



$74,820 84 



104 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



CONFERENCE RECEIPTS FOR 1937-1938 



2; 

c 
B 


CONFERENCES 




a 
£S 

to, 

c 
a 
0. 


CO 


: S 


a 

1 

a 


si 




Perpetual 
Membership 


< 

a 
a. 

f 
a 


1 


1 




$208 00 

220 25 

5,425 20 

158 80 

2,708 26 

46 00 

5,530 80 

5,464 39 

77 15 

2,475 30 

708 25 

641 09 

6,880 53 

2 00 

153 00 

4,797 90 

138 30 

3,722 85 

113 72 

1,380 51 

508 87 

6,930 30 

4,251 90 

5,588 13 

3,324 27 

846 25 

782 75 

282 86 

050 00 

4,000 00 

1,383 83 

211 50 

3,258 13 

416 85 

3.774 77 

4,670 40 

2,022 40 

1,460 59 

678 15 

4,055 70 

318 55 

4,145 00 

3,318 16 

356 50 

587 65 

5,338 96 

11,939 45 

2.163 77 

2.647 52 

3.135 00 

2.700 18 

1,024 85 

16,026 2C 

3,185 58 

1,300 4C 

2,828 61 

6.556 7- 

6,395 7C 

52 OC 

8,500 OC 

1,170 7i 

155 0( 

370 3( 

23 0( 

346 0( 

10,505 1 

2,853 1 

79 


S25 00 

7 60 

2,736 00 

38 77 

831 47 




116 78 

23 38 
519 78 

20 29 

266 82 

2 00 

485 88 

300 00 

15 00 
292 51 

45 32 

166 11 

1,079 49 








$50 00 


9 


Atlanta 








$2 00 
125 00 




S 






$150 00 
10 50 
100 00 


$200 00 




4 








5 






150 00 


65 00 


200 00 


fi 








7 


Central New York 


3,000 00 

1.925 00 
17 45 

1,754 45 
703 49 
200 00 

4,500 00 




139 00 

100 00 

3 00 

100 83 


300 00 
540 00 


150 00 
150 00 


300 00 


8 


Central Pennsylvania 


$1,435 00 


350 00 


q 


Central West , . 




in 






50 00 
50 00 


50 00 


64 42 


11 








1'^ 




695 18 


10 00 
300 00 


10 00 
200 00 


73 00 


13 


Detroit 


800 00 


1,330 80 


14 


East Swedish 






IS 


East Tennessee 

Erie 


60 00 

5,500 00 

6 45 

2,614 00 

14 38 

770 00 

272 00 

1,376 90 

2,946 64 

3,380 08 

2,000 00 

300 00 

160 00 

52 73 

400 00 

2.083 00 

1.500 00 

13 50 

1.500 00 

100 oa 

2.011 04 
2.569 80 

711 20 

661 52 

268 85 
1.300 00 

384 84 

2.500 00 

2.515 00 

48 00 

920 25 
2,510 00 
6,170 73 
2,671 00 
1.684 31 
2.469 67 
54 00 

521 46 
9,000 OC 
3,145 34 

825 OC 
1,042 OC 
1.147 OC 
3.800 OC 




29 95 

390 93 

14 31 

210 01 

7 90 

228 60 

75 01 

875 00 

411 42 

443 45 

428 31 

134 11 

77 00 

13 55 

53 10 

521 21 

158 79 

13 06 

331 96 

38 27 

591 96 

608 73 

42 88 

104 44 

9 93 

535 80 

47 84 

414 25 

531 37 

41 60 

132 05 

672 64 

1,888 75 

237 03 

183 74 

333 75 

356 69 

176 52 

1.000 OC 

332 31 

118 05 

270 8C 

425 92 

500 OC 










If. 


2,993 28 


50 00 


350 00 


188 00 


509 00 


17 


Florida 




18 


Genesee 




25 00 


200 00 




391 22 


IP 










?n 






20 00 


100 00 


50 00 
20 00 


186 25 


^1 






60 00 


?' 


Illinois 


1.870 00 
2.465 91 


99 00 


650 00 
150 00 
100 00 
250 00 


2 00 


?3 


Indiana 


25 00 
100 CO 
2 45 
25 00 
25 00 




1?4 


lowa-Des Moines 


50 00 
48 00 
20 00 
10 25 


677 70 


?5 


Kansas 


2.082 50 


1.000 00 


?fi 




50 00 


^7 


Lexington 






50 00 


?8 


Louisiana 






5 00 


?<» 




360 00 


100 00 
50 00 
26 00 




10 00 
8 50 
100 00 
5 00 
10 00 
50 00 




30 


Michigan 


200 00 
50 00 


500 00 


31 


Minnesota 


2.220 00 


150 00 


3? 


Mississippi 




33 


Missouri 


2.334 00 


50 00 

5 00 

150 00 

106 10 

20 00 
143 75 


50 00 

""50 00 

50 00 
200 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 


610 00 


34 


Montana State 

Nebraska 


100 00 


3F) 




213 71 


3fi 


Newark 




221 50 
40 00 
37 50 
25 00 

175 00 
11 00 

100 00 

100 00 


2,763 26 


37 


New England 






38 


New England Southern 

New Hampshire 




91 00 


3<t 




25 00 


40 


New Jersey 




100 00 


308 00 


41 






26 80 


4? 


New York 




100 00 
107 00 




90,115 00 


43 


New York East 




100 00 


455 00 


44 


North Carolina 




21 00 


45 






25 00 




3 00 

200 00 

253 70 

50 00 

39 45 

77 25 

56 10 

20 00 

300 00 

90 02 




4fi 


North Indiana. . . . 


1,500 00 


350 00 
550 00 
100 00 
150 00 
100 00 
150 00 
100 00 
750 00 
100 00 




47 


North-East Ohio 


100 00 
50 00 
34 00 
50 00 
75 00 
58 30 

100 00 

22 25 


1,220 00 


48 


Northern Minnesota. . 




300 00 


41 


Northern New York . , . 




113 00 


50 


Northwest Indiana 




265 00 


51 








5? 


Northwest Kansas 




46 00 


53 




4.500 00 




54 


Oklahoma 


149 95 


55 




900 00 
3.319 38 


50 00 


5fi 


Pacific Nfirthwest 


28 7C 
100 OD 




200 00 
50 OC 
200 OC 


17 48 
100 OC 
184 OC 


200 00 


57 




461 00 


58 


Pittsburgh 


. 


1,500 00 


5Q 











fiO 


Rock River 


4.750 0( 

651 3f 

) 25 2. 

) 75 0( 


) 


843 7C 
116 9; 

18 2. 

25 OC 


200 OC 
25 OC 


650 OC 


500 OC 
25 OC 


1.800 00 


fil 




174 00 


e,?. 









3 00 


03 




) 


) 


50 OC 


10 OC 


50 00 


64 








05 




) 250 
I 1.225 
5 1,733 8 
) 7 


) 


50 0( 
524 9( 
582 4( 

12 OC 


) 






50 00 


00 


Southern California 


) 


) 


450 OC 
) 50 OC 





550 00 


07 




I 


) 52 OC 
) 


100 OC 


) 700 00 


08 




) 



















Report of Treasurer. 



105 



CONFERENCE RECEIPTS FOR 1937-1938 





ii 

So" 


^2 

§1 

•a CO 


go? 

ri 


■a 
■2. 


« S- 

• t3 

; p. 


H 
1 


w 
S 

c 


> 
a 
a 
E. 

f' 


9 
S 

s. 

o 
S" 

1 


c 
3 




S5 00 

2 00 
258 52 

3 00 
40 59 


$175 00 

10 00 

4,695 00 

137 76 

4,819 45 


$36 16 


$28 05 


$10 00 


$553 99 

271 23 

27.468 21 

379 27 

10,564 68 

48 00 

19.453 87 

21.045 15 

149 17 

10.234 87 

2.126 07 

3.773 27 

34,108 43 

102 00 

281 87 

27,950 04 

177 82 

18,936 00 

138 00 

4.818 84 

1,999 17 

41,132 29 

17.414 03 

20.924 07 

14.903 54 

2,655 80 

1.916 33 

357 28 

2.817 13 

17.070 43 

9.133 22 

295 01 

14,250 74 

1,987 62 

16,721 21 

21.563 56 
5,586 28 
5,617 52 
1,795 93 

13.833 07 

1,456 20 

104.469 34 

15.421 46 

691 90 

2.817 11 

17.564 08 
56.691 30 
12.179 78 
10.426 62 
10.8G6 62 
10.074 81 

4.047 92 

67,329 50 

8,105 45 

5,346 43 

12,113 19 

15.147 22 

35.891 45 

52 00 

42.446 53 

3,213 70 

278 57 

827 30 

28 00 

1.167 00 

66,476 57 

10,741 83 

108 00 








1 










2 




8,531 24 

10 15 

1.324 12 


4.827 47 






$1,000 00 




3 










4 




30 00 


28 97 


$3,002 02 






5 








6 




100 00 
350 00 

10 57 

150 00 

3 07 

39 45 
667 60 


6,075 00 

2,963 25 

26 00 

2,442 00 

555 89 

255 00 

12,365 00 

100 00 

19 05 

3.102 82 


3,160 24 
5,914 76 


169 75 
1.552 75 


43 20 


310 86 
682 86 




$60 00 


7 






8 










9 




2,805 36 

60 05 

1,494 62 

5,640 00 


40 00 


10 00 


100 00 






10 








11 




181 82 
339 52 


7 00 
5 49 








n 




1.000 00 


2, 600 00 


15 00 


13 




14 




4 40 
250 00 

2 00 
139 01 

2 00 
25 30 






15 47 

24 00 

9 20 

37 00 








15 




9.479 49 


314 62 

7 50 

52 10 


250 00 






16 








17 




4,888 30 


6,656 51 


1,444 76 




15 00 


18 






1<» 




1,745 00 

898 00 

2,739 00 

2,835 41 

5,784 16 

4,577 00 

965 00 

590 00 


273 37 

109 08 

19.019 70 

4,030 90 

3.932 41 

780 60 

197 00 

170 83 


29 00 
56 21 
613 90 
149 30 
423 66 
182 01 
51 00 
20 00 


10 81 








20 










21 


$6 737 56 


218 93 
147 55 
408 87 
228 40 
67 44 
30 50 

3 14 
25 00 

100 00 
74 00 

4 25 
192 73 

10 00 
204 95 
667 77 
21 40 
62 10 
64 00 
200 95 




1,169 76 
500 00 


1,000 00 




n 








n 




35 61 


2,000 00 
1.000 00 




24 








25 










?6 












27 












28 




990 00 

2, 192 00 

2,891 00 

37 00 

5,050 00 

950 00 
6,038 99 
8,490 92 
2,479 40 
1,316 75 

675 00 
3,582 11 

639 77 
5,742 19 
4,345 00 

199 50 
1,108 18 
4,290 00 
11,656 27 
5,734 25 
5,076 07 
3,189 12 
2,953 10 
1,698 15 
15.270 00 

190 40 
1,525 00 
2.158 55 
4.440 60 
6,008 00 


146 86 

7,224 12 

394 50 


46 00 
143 07 
145 10 

10 70 
357 42 

47 50 
321 21 
758 08 

49 00 
27 00 


36 17 
48 53 
40 00 


1,435 29 
100 00 






n 






62 00 


30 




500 00 


31 








32 




501 50 

250 00 

3.299 58 

657 00 


5 00 
20 00 
65 00 








33 










34 






3.000 00 




35 








36 






4,752 37 
1,000 00 






37 




1,661 87 


1 00 






38 








39 




3,392 61 


132 90 

11 40 

265 58 

219 00 




597 10 


1.000 00 


50 00 


40 




16 00 
43 34 
33 75 
15 30 


41 




200 00 
240 00 

10 00 
18 15 
350 00 
801 42 
100 00 
98 45 
212 10 

201 00 

70 25 
1,200 00 

71 32 
100 00 
131 95 
223 40 
500 Ofl 


843 98 
3,457 18 




1.000 00 
6.000 00 




42 




650 00 




43 






44 






22 83 

143 75 

413 82 

274 42 

10 00 

249 00 

58 63 

35 00 

852 75 

194 60 

10 00 

97 70 

355 00 

413 75 








45 


501 81 


1.706 92 

21,659 91 

474 31 

376 15 

747 26 

3.433 43 

269 19 

15,238 55 

538 76 

513 98 

1,817 96 

1.187 53 

16.390 OC 




60 00 
2.515 00 






4fi 




37 25 
25 00 
13 93 

38 47 
36 68 
28 20 
42 00 
84 92 

4 00 


1.100 00 
200 00 




47 






48 




26.287 3i 


49 




2.000 00 




50 








RI 










52 




2,077 50 


2.600 00 




53 




54 










55 




155 00 






56 




100 00 






57 




671 76 


2.000 00 


45 00 


58 






59 




645 OD 

27 80 

5 OC 

15 OC 

5 OC 

35 OC 

211 97 

150 OC 


18.457 00 

827 39 

32 00 

232 00 


5,708 03 

150 76 

11 5C 


288 48 
23 50 
14 60 


104 32 
21 20 
13 97 


350 00 


2.100 00 
1.000 00 




60 






61 








62 










62 
















64 




370 00 

3.010 00 

2.724 00 

10 00 


66 OC 

49.483 94 

1.608 IS 












65 




515 62 
188 34 




19.193 65 


4,850 00 
1,000 00 




66 








67 










68 





















106 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

CONFERENCE RECEIPTS FOR 1937-1938— (Concluded) 





2; 

i 

r 


CONFERENCES 




s. 

c 
c- 




II 
2. 5 


D 

s- 

5' 




1^ 

il 

a p_ 

■5' 


Silver and Linen.. . 


Building 


61 




?4,223 39 

81 18 

468 35 

4,183 00 

2,371 35 

116 40 

100 51 

651 05 

522 15 

156 00 

3,124 86 

915 92 

2,000 00 

2,298 41 

6,031 40 

232 39 

2 00 

43 00 

5 00 


.52,616 05 

36 00 

61 40 

2,850 00 

2,625 00 

25 00 

49 00 

483 38 

125 00 

7 00 

500 00 

729 90 

313 00 

1,014 87 

1,948 00 

118 59 




$525 67 

19 00 

93 30 

222 08 

276 00 

5 00 
18 61 
51 03 

114 05 

6 00 
439 51 
112 14 
230 60 
375 29 
531 58 

38 62 




$150 00 


$100 00 


$417 15 


70 










71 


Texas 












79 


Troy 






150 00 
50 00 


83 00 
200 00 


1 060 00 


73 






$25 00 


250 00 


74 








75 












5 00 


76 






' 15 00 


100 00 


10 00 


50 00 


77 






25 00 


78 










2 50 


79 








50 00 


100 00 
47 00 
25 00 
55 00 

149 00 


200 00 


SO 




$730 00 
690 00 




37 00 


81 




"100 00 


200 00 
100 00 
350 00 


50 00 


8? 




75 55 


83 






411 00 


84 


Wyoming State 




6 00 


S") 












86 


East German ... 
















87 




1 00 












14,287 44 




Totals 


















$215,505 56 


Sill, 940 53 


$28,095 25 


$22,478 09 


$3,253 68 


$9,890 00 


$4,875 95 


$125,186 75 



PLEDGES TO NATIONAL WORK FOR 1938-1939 



Conference 



Alabama 

Atlanta 

Baltimore 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic.. . . 

California 

Central .Alabama 

Central New York. . . . 
Central Pennsylvania. . 

Central West 

Colorado 

Dakota 

Delaware 

Detroit 

East Tennessee 

Erie 

Florida 

Genesee 

Georgia 

Holston 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

lowa-Des Moines 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Le.xington 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana State 

Nebraska 

Newark 

New England 

New England Southern. 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

New York East 

North Carolina 



General 
Fund 



$210 00 
225 00 

5,350 00 
175 00 

2,700 00 
100 00 

5,500 00 

5,100 00 
150 00 

2,400 00 
775 00 
700 00 

6,500 00 



AUXILURIES AND YoUNG PEOPLE 



Salary 



5,000 00 

125 00 

4,000 00 

75 00 

1,250 00 

550 00 

4,300 00 

4,300 00 

5,500 00 

3,250 00 

775 00 

800 00 

280 00 

650 00 

4,000 00 

1,350 00 

250 00 

3,100 00 

400 00 

4,200 00 

4,700 00 

2,025 00 

1,600 00 

500 00 

4,100 00 

300 00 

3,650 00 

3,500 00 

425 00 



$50 00 

40 00 

4.231 00 

35 00 

1,400 00 

5 00 

3,000 00 

2,000 00 

70 00 

1,800 00 

400 00 

300 00 

4,500 00 



Student 
Aid 



5,200 00 

10 00 

2,500 00 

15 00 

850 00 

250 00 

1,350 00 

3,000 00 

3,000 00 

2,4.50 00 

300 00 

225 00 

50 00 

400 00 

2,000 00 

1,600 00 

25 00 

1,600 00 

250 00 

1 , 850 00 

2,500 00 

850 00 

550 00 

225 00 

1,300 00 

500 00 

1.550 00 

2.500 00 

60 00 



$205 00 

75 00 

3.485 00 

100 00 

4,400 00 

25 00 

6,400 00 

4,000 00 

80 00 

2,500 00 

1,035 00 

215 00 

12,305 00 



Building 



$30 00 



35 00 
250 00 



3. 850 00 

50 00 

5,150 00 

25 00 

1,775 00 

925 00 
2,700 00 
3,300 00 
6,850 00 
4,425 00 
1,000 00 

575 00 
25 00 
1,100 00 
3,450 00 
2,700 00 
30 00 
5,700 00 
1,000 00 
6,000 00 
9,500 00 
2,700 00 
1,500 00 

750 00 
3,900 00 

750 00 
7.600 00 
4,950 00 

150 00 



500 00 
625 00 
30 00 



Cash for 
Supplies 



$10 00 



100 00 
25 00 
100 00 



100 00 
500 00 



60 00 

125 00 

1,250 00 



850 00 
30 00 

750 00 
10 00 

125 00 
60 00 

250 00 

250 00 
1,000 00 

250 00 
60 00 
60 00 
10 00 



625 00 

190 00 

30 00 

1,000 00 

125 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

125 00 

125 00 

30 00 

350 00 

30 00 

1,000 00 



30 00 



25 00 

15 00 

10 00 

150 00 



Junior 
Dept. 



150 00 



50 00 



25 00 
25 00 
300 00 
100 00 
150 00 
75 00 
35 00 
10 00 



35 00 
50 00 
25 00 



50 00 

10 00 

100 00 

200 00 

25 00 

25 00 

10 00 

50 00 

10 00 

100 00 

35 00 



$10 00 



250 00 

5 00 

25 00 

10 00 

100 00 

350 00 
10 00 

200 00 
25 00 
55 00 

600 00 



250 GO 

10 00 

150 00 



25 00 

25 00 

250 00 

200 00 

375 00 

200 00 

55 00 

10 00 

10 00 

25 00 

200 00 

75 00 



150 00 

10 00 

225 00 

600 00 

50 00 

50 00 

60 00 

225 00 

10 00 

200 00 

225 00 

10 00 



Total 



S485 00 

370 00 

13,416 00 

375 00 

8,875 00 

140 00 

15,600 00 

12,575 00 

340 00 

6,925 00 

2,310 00 

1,405 00 

25,305 00 



15,300 00 

225 00 

12,600 00 

125 00 

4,050 00 

1,835 00 

9,150 00 

11,150 00 

16,875 00 

10,650 00 

2,225 00 

1,680 00 

375 00 

2,210 00 

10,325 00 

5,940 00 

335 00 

11,600 00 

1,795 00 

12,875 00 

18,500 00 

5.775 00 

3,850 00 

1,575 00 

9,925 00 

1,600 00 

14.100 00 

11,210 00 

675 00 



Report of Treasurer. 



107 



CONFERENCE RECEIPTS FOR 1937-1938— (Concluded) 





Conference 
Buildine 


3 2- 


^ a. 
3 a 

IE 

•o a 

3 a. 


so9 

3 " o 
3 X 

3 3 


CO 

c 
■a 
•o. 


II 
■ o' 
; 3 


o 


a 

r: 
c 




3 


CO 

•o 

g 

3 

1 


c 
3 
r 
1 




$300 00 
2 00 


$4,625 47 

2 14 

2 00 

5,527 24 

1,730 00 

25 00 

287 62 

398 49 

262 85 

41 00 

2,175 00 

1,668 51 

1,307 00 

2,263 00 

4,797 00 

432 01 


$3,590 25 


$262 02 


$35 00 


$16,845 00 

140 32 

625 05 

14,971 05 

8,756 16 

175 40 

465 54 

1,920 15 

1,383 69 

217 50 

14,372 21 

4,556 85 

8,408 29 

6.743 02 

22,036 58 

882 11 

2 00 

43 00 

14,624 25 




$1,000 00 




i9 








ro 
















}\ 




106 88 
75 40 

4 00 
1 00 

23 13 
36 10 

5 00 
100 00 

25 53 

35 00 

46 92 

547 25 


587 85 
918 22 


191 00 
195 06 


10 00 
40 13 


$85 24 
100 00 






T> 




1.000 00 




n 






M 




3 80 
110 97 
226 50 












?5 




10 00 
13 50 


32 10 
43 54 








?6 










11 










rs 




7,660 33 
190 85 

3,515 42 
364 57 

6,868 00 
36 10 




22 51 








lU 




100 00 
35 26 
136 82 
303 35 
13 00 






80 




7 01 
12 59 


235 78 




81 




1.000 00 


82 






83 




5 40 






84 










85 


















86 




61 SO 


75 00 




22 25 


172 06 




10 00 


87 












$10 


.289 37 


$11,777 01 


$224,962 13 


$240,910 95 


$17,046 67 


$1,491 12 


$1 027,703 06 


$68,726 26 


$38,960 00 


$247 00 





PLEDGES TO NATIONAL WORK FOR 1938-1939 





General 
Fund 


Auxiliaries and Young People 


Junior 
Dept. 




Conference 


Salary 


Student 
Aid 


Building 


Cash for 
Supplies 


Total 


North Dakota 


700 00 

5.000 00 

12,000 00 

2.000 00 

2.700 00 

3,000 00 

2,500 00 

1.050 00 

16.000 00 

3.000 00 

1,225 00 

2.700 00 

6.000 00 

6.000 00 

8,750 00 

850 00 

125 00 

450 00 

30 00 

335 00 

10.000 00 

2.. 525 00 

100 00 

4,000 00 


700 00 
2.350 00 
7,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,000 00 
2,500 00 

300 00 

500 00 
9.000 00 
3,000 00 

825 00 
1,100 00 
1 , 150 00 
3.800 00 
4,. 500 00 

650 00 
50 00 
75 00 


1.400 00 

4.400 00 

13.000 00 

4.500 00 

5.500 00 

3.400 00 

2.700 00 

1.700 00 

15.000 00 

710 00 

1.500 00 

2.270 00 

4.670 00 

0.400 00 

16,800 00 

S50 00 

50 00 

150 00 


60 00 

300 00 

1,250 00 

375 00 


10 00 
25 00 

150 00 

200 00 
25 00 
50 00 
30 00 
25 00 

350 00 
30 00 
25 00 
20 00 

200 00 
50 00 

200 00 
10 00 


60 00 

3.5(1 00 

1.000 00 

100 00 

no 00 

225 00 
175 00 

75 00 
1.200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
150 00 
250 00 
500 00 
650 00 

20 00 
5 00 

15 00 

8 on 

35 00 

500 00 

150 00 

5 00 

275 00 


2.930 00 
12.425 00 


North-East Ohio 

Northern Minnesota. . , . 


34.900 00 
i),ti75 00 
10.335 00 


Northwest Indiana 

Northwest Iowa 

Northwest Kansas 

Ohio 


300 00 

eooo 

1,250 00 

125 00 

60 00 

250 00 

500 00 

1,250 00 


9.475 00 
5.705 00 
3.410 00 
42.800 00 




6.965 00 




3.735 00 


Pacific Northwest 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 


6.490 00 
12.770 00 
18,000 00 
30.900 00 


St. Johns River 


60 00 
30 00 
00 00 


2.440 00 
260 00 






750 00 


South Florida 




3S 00 


Southern 


240 00 

1.232 00 

1.300 00 

30 00 

2.500 00 


350 00 

9,923 00 

3,000 00 

25 00 

4,500 00 


50 00 

430 00 

1,000 00 

10 00 
400 00 


10 00 


1.020 00 
22.085 00 


Southern Illinois 


60 00 


S.035 00 
170 00 


Southwest Kansas 


100 00 


11.775 0) 


Texas 


380 00 

4,000 00 

2,100 00 

80 00 

100 00 

700 00 

525 00 

135 00 

3,200 00 

925 00 

2,100 00 

2,200 00 

6.300 00 

185 00 


100 00 

2., 850 00 

2.500 00 

25 00 

65 00 

400 00 

125 00 

10 00 

500 00 

600 00 

525 00 

1,050 00 

2,275 00 

100 00 


50 00 

6.100 00 

2,000 00 

25 00 

217 50 

475 00 

300 00 

100 00 

2,500 00 

2.000 00 

1.175 00 

2.450 00 

5.225 00 

350 00 






5 00 
100 00 
75 00 


535 00 


Troy 

Upper Iowa 


1,000 00 
250 00 


100 00 
75 00 


14.150 00 
7.000 00 


Upper Mississippi 


130 00 


10 00 
60 00 
30 00 




2 50 
25 00 
25 00 
5 00 
50 00 
35 00 
35 00 
30 00 
550 00 


395 00 






1.660 00 


Washington 




1.005 00 




250 00 




250 00 
60 00 
60 00 

250 00 

1,250 00 

10 00 




6.500 00 






3,620 00 






3.895 00 




50 00 
75 00 
10 00 


f,.030 00 


V\yoming 

W.voming State 


15.675 00 
655 00 






Totals 


$208,810 00 


$113,718 00 


$243,020 50 


$22,820 00 


$4,560 00 


$12,310 50 


$605,239 00 



108 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

DISBURSEMENTS FOR 1937-1938 TO HOMES AND SCHOOLS 



INSTITUTIONS 


Salary 


Student 
Aid 


Interest 


Building 


Silver and 
Linen 


Self 
Help 


Total 




J6,383 78 

960 00 

407 00 

1,080 00 

1,530 00 

1,004 00 

3,276 00 

406 00 

224 00 

2,552 00 

550 00 

600 00 

2,955 00 

6,661 00 

500 OO 

4,179 00 

1,210 00 

8,132 00 

1,998 80 

4,015 00 

5,710 50 

4,595 36 

540 00 

1.810 00 

1,481 00 

2,996 00 

3,630 00 

2,894 00 

1,856 50 

802 00 

406 00 

647 00 

949 23 

1.175 00 

700 00 

521 50 

7.626 00 

4.520 00 

4,300 00 

6,558 00 

1,500 00 

1,460 00 

1,424 00 

6,104 21 

3,167 50 

3,876 00 

203 00 

4.147 00 

2.495 00 

780 00 

2.150 00 

1.705 00 

5,625 24 

7,581 28 

9,675 25 

1,646 00 

2,327 00 

1,883 00 

484 00 

2,053 00 

3,480 00 

2,879 00 


$13,865 00 




$3,365 94 


$200 00 


$8,271 94 
800 00 


$32 086 66 


Seward General Hospital 




1 760 00 










407 00 


Maynard-Columbus Hospital. . 













1 080 00 


1,307 00 
312 97 

1,822 00 
900 00 










2 837 00 


C. Blaine 








451 10 
585 65 


1 768 07 


H K Manley 








5 683 65 










1 306 00 












224 00 




3,336 00 

210 00 

575 00 

2,000 00 

5,490 00 






33 47 


2,189 40 
864 22 
378 50 


8 110 87 








1 624 22 










1 553 50 










4 955 00 








200 00 


7,397 05 


19 748 05 








500 00 




3,308 00 
3.869 00 
3.630 00 
2.876 00 
1.701 00 
1.835 00 
6,767 00 




11.627 33 


50 00 


1,323 71 


20,488 04 




$45 75 


5 124 75 






50 00 


4,252 11 

5,865 26 

786 42 


16 064 11 


Peek 






10 740 06 






4,750 00 


50 00 
150 00 
100 00 


11 302 42 






7,695 50 








4,i78 07 

9,535 82 

499 33 


15,640 43 








10 075 82 




1,993 00 
1,338 00 
2,760 00 
2.990 00 
3.380 00 
2.480 00 
960 00 


45 00 






4 347 33 








2 819 00 










2,319 61 
256 00 

1,076 21 
509 77 


8! 075 61 


Blodgett.- 








6,876 00 








58 62 
23 96 


7 408 83 








4 870 23 








1,762 00 












406 00 


Riverton 


975 00 










1,622 00 


Esther, Ogden 








148 45 


1,097 68 


Highland Boy, Bingham 


2,750 00 








3,925 00 








18,376 11 


19 076 11 




570 00 
2,235 00 
6,260 00 
6,000 00 
12,737 00 

780 00 

470 00 

240 00 
9,601 00 
2,900 00 
2,490 00 

120 00 
5.796 00 
8.774 00 
1.355 00 

335 31 
1.130 00 
5,170 00 

305 00 
4,690 00 
2,030 00 
1,375 00 
1,275 00 

613 00 
2.815 00 
3.875 00 
5.635 00 
12.720 50 
2.860 00 
1.682 00 
2.255 00 
8.128 00 
5.000 00 

618 00 








1,091 50 


Brewster Hospital 




1,801 84 


200 00 
73 19 

250 00 
49 32 
15 00 


6.597 22 
5,484 27 


18 460 06 


Medical Mission 




16,337 46 


Sibley Memorial Hospital 

Navajo 






10,550 00 




7,000 00 
100 00 


928 58 
180 49 
158 73 
316 56 

5,921 55 
427 92 

3,280 90 


27,272 90 






2,575 49 






2,088 73 


Yuma 






10 00 

200 00 

4 60 

50 00 


1,990 56 


Harwood 






21,826 76 


Houchen 


3 50 




6,503 52 


Freeman CI. and Newark Hosp. 


1.693 06 


11,389 96 


Bingham-Bxtension 




323 00 


Methodist Sanatorium 

E. Harnst 


182 10 


93 00 
2.300 75 


153 97 
130 96 
25 00 


1.366 80 

2,762 20 

261 75 

5,912 00 

6,022 60 

4.753 67 

23.7.54 63 

14,604 00 

4,441 70 

1,514 11 

108 27 

177 20 

2,048 00 

6,292 50 

334 99 


11,738 87 
16,462 91 


McCarty 




2,421 75 


McClesky 






8.397 31 


Ritter 






50 00 

87 94 

226 90 

200 00 

50 00 

10 00 

25 00 

5 00 

65 00 

50 00 


8,907 60 


E'ie and Aiken 


40 00 
200 00 




15,676 85 


Pfeiffer Junior 


79,. 303 21 
2,421 52 


111,371 0? 


Wood Junior. . . 


31 590 77 


Eliza Dee 




8 167 70 


Rust 






5 226 11 


Faith Community 






3 291 27 


Italian Kindergarten 






1 279 20 


Gilbert Academy and Peck . . 






6,981 00 


Thayer 






13,697 50 


Sager-Brown 






8 848 99 


Bennett College 




19,173 72 


250 00 
50 00 
75 00 
100 00 
150 


32 144 22 


Allen 


5.585 00 
5,385 00 
8.797 90 
6.720 77 




8,792 57 
7,602 98 
13,626 99 
4,421 08 


17,287 57 


Boylan-Haven 






14,744 98 


Browning 






24 779 89 


Geo. 0. Robinson 






19,419 85 


Santo Domingo 






5,000 00 


Alma Mathews 


540 00 
300 00 

2.301 46 
700 00 
170 00 
170 00 

7.419 00 
200 03 






50 00 


2,434 51 


3.642 51 


Japanese B.W. (N. Y.) 






300 00 


Bancroft 


7.352 00 
1.090 00 


30 00 






8,059 65 
2,750 00 


17.743 11 




250 00 




4.790 00 


Chautauqua 






170 00 


Thompson 












170 00 


Kansas City Nat'l Train. Sch 


7,408 00 


542 86 




149 59 


8 318 00 


23.837 45 


Misenheimer — Pastor 




200 00 
















Totals 


$207,276 28 


$212,119 78 


$1,089 21 


$133,880 37 


$3,672 52 


$223,721 15 


$781,759 31 







APPROPRIATIONS 



of 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society 

OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

For the Year Ending July 31, 1939 



Estimated 

Expenditures 

1938-1939 



Receipts 
1936-1937 



Total Receipts for the year ending July 31, 1937. 



$2,351,113 00 



Income for General Fund $212 , 847 00 

and Salaries 109 , 037 00 



Lenten Offering 

Interest on Investments 

Deaconess Assessments 

Missionary Assessments 

Refimd on Joint Insurance Plan. 
From Balance in Lenten 



Interest on Endowments, Annuities, and Insurance Reserve . 

Insurance 

Taxes 



Perpetual Membership Dues. 

Care of Missionaries 

Expense Farms 



Total . 



370,000 00 

7,200 00 

8,500 00 

20,500 00 

10,000 00 

4,000 00 



$120,200 00 



$321,884 00 

21,679 00 

74,731 00 

1,680 00 

702 00 

1,732 00 

12,000 00 



$434,408 00 



Amount to be Appropriated to Administration and Bureau Expense 



$314,208 00 



109 



no 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



ADMINISTRATION 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Unconditional Conditional 



Corresponding Secretary — 

Remuneration, Office Expense, and Rent 

Treasurer — 

Remuneration, Office Expense and Rent 

Expert Advice, Legal and Financial — 

Auditor 

Expert Advice 

Attorney 

Legal Expense 

Recording Secretary — 

Office Expense, Printing of Minutes 

Executive Officers — 

Travel and Expense 

Departments — 

Wesleyan Service Guild (Salary and Expense) 

Young People's (Office Expense) 

Junior (Office Expense and Devices) 

Committees — 

Secretary of Deaconess Personnel : 

Deaconess Allowance and Living Expense 

Travel 

Office Expense 

Office Assistant 

Secretary of Education and Personnel : 

Salary 

Travel 

Stenographer 

Expense 

Special Lectures in Colleges 

Annual Meeting of Board of Managers 

Meetings of the Board of Trustees 

Meetings of Business Committee 

Bureau Secretaries' Travel and Expense 

Standing Committees: 

Board of Managers 

Board of Trustees 

Missionary and Deaconess Travel 

Total for Administration 



$3,876 00 



7,080 00 



750 00 

150 00 

1,683 00 

750 00 





600 


00 




750 


00 


1 


,000 


00 


1 


,000 


00 




300 


00 



1,236 00 
250 00 
200 00 
766 00 



1,600 00 

250 00 

780 00 

360 00 

100 00 



4,500 00 

3,000 00 

300 00 

2,500 00 

1,005 00 
1,760 00 



3,000 00 



$39,546 00 



$2,000 00 



$2,000 00 



Appropriations. 



Ill 



PROMOTION AND PUBLICITY 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Unconditional 



Promotion : 

Promotional (Under Corresponding Secretary) 

Summer Schools 

Student Work 



Publicity : 

Rent for Headquarters Offices . 



Cincinnati — 
Salaries : 

Publisher 

Editorial Staff 

General Publications (Salaries) 

San Francisco — 

Salary 

Rent 



Printing — 

Leaflets (Free for Postage) 

Annual Report 

Blanks, Cards, etc 

Expense for Handling Slides. . . 



Total for Promotion and Publicity . 



SPECIAL FUNDS 

Permanent Missionary 

Relief Fund for Care of Deaconesses 

*Migrant Work 

Emergency 

Lenten Offering for Retired Missionaries 

Junior Special 

Salary for Chaplain, Hospital No. 66 

American Peace Society 

Latin American Conference 

Committee for Santo Domingo 

*Membership and Fees — Council of Women 

Committee on Interracial Co-operation, Atlanta 

Committee on Church and Race Relations, Women's 

Work 

Committee on Race Relations, Federal Council 

Mountain Workers' Conference 

*Religious Education Director — Indian Schools 

Interdenominational Council on Spanish-Speaking 

Work, Home Missions Council 

Missionary Education Movement 

Silver and Linen 

Care of Unproductive Property 

Deaconess — Portsmouth Navy Yard 

Marine Mission 

National Coimcil of Methodist Youth 



Total for Special Funds . 



Total for Administration, Promotion and Publicity and 
Special Fimds 



$4,500 00 
525 00 
300 00 



2,520 00 



1,683 00 
4,031 00 
3,696 00 



673 00 
270 00 



3,500 00 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 

200 00 



$25,398 00 



$15,000 00 



1.800 00 

25 00 

50 00 

50 00 

850 00 

50 00 

50 00 

100 00 

25 00 

450 00 

100 00 
200 00 

500 00 

790 00 

1.000 00 

250 00 



$21,290 00 



$86,234 00 



Conditional 



Total 



$2,000 00 



$2,000 00 



$3,000 00 
6,000 00 
2,800 00 
10,000 00 
23,000 00 
13.000 00 



5.000 00 



$62,800 GO 



$6,500 00 
525 00 
300 00 



2,520 00 



9,410 00 



943 00 



7,200 00 



$27,398 00 



$3,000 00 

6,000 00 

2,800 00 

25,000 00 

23,000 00 

13,000 00 

1,800 00 

25 00 

50 00 

50 00 

850 00 

50 00 

50 00 
100 00 

25 00 
450 00 

100 00 
200 00 

5,000 00 
500 00 
790 00 

1,000 00 
250 00 



$84,090 00 



$66,800 00 $153,034 00 



*Under auspices of the Council of Women for Home Missions. 



112 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Number employed, resident students, day students, are now to be found in the bureau reports. 
The difference between the Total Budget and Total Appropriations represents the estimated 
income from tuition, board, special departments, farms, interests, etc. 

Scholarship in Industrial School, $100; in Training School, $300; Junior College, $150. 



BUREAUS 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Total 
Budget 



Salary 



Current 
Expense and 
Student Aid 



Total 



Board and 
Room 



Total 
Salary 



ALASKA AND NORTH- 
WEST 

Jesse Lee Home, Seward. 

Seward General Hospital 

Lavinia Wallace Young 
Mission, Nome 

Maynard-ColumbusHos- 
pital, Nome 

Unalaska Mission, Un- 
alaska 

Catherine Blaine Home, 
Seattle, Wash 

Manley Community Cen- 
ter, Portland, Ore. . . . 

Total for Alaska and 
Northwest 



;36,212 00 
22,822 00 

1,487 00 

16,403 00 

2,717 00 

408 00 

7,681 00 



$7,802 00 
960 00 

432 00 
1,080 00 
1,600 00 

408 00 
3,716 00 



$13,960 00 



1,117 00 



1,765 00 



$900 00 



$53,822 00 



1,325 00 



$87,730 00 $15,998 00 $16,842 00 

CALIFORNIA AND 
HAWAII 

Angel Island, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif $1 , 306 00 $406 00 

Bible Woman, Los An 
geles, Calif 240 00 240 00 

Chinese Home, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif 8,606 00 3,03100 

Japanese Friendly Center, 
San Francisco, Calif. 
(E. S. Ford) 1 ,430 00 600 00 

Japanese Neighborhood 
House (Jane Couch 
Memorial), Los An- 
geles, Calif 1 ,085 00 600 00 

^Susannah Wesley Home, 
Honolulu, Hawaii 21,225 00 3,600 00 

Frances DePauw School, 

Los Angeles, Calif. ... 19,330 00 6,630 00 

Mexican and Calexico. . 600 00 600 00 

Total for California 
and Hawaii 



!1,762 00 
960 00 

432 00 
1,080 00 
2,717 00 

408 00 
5,481 00 



$32,840 00 



[5,707 00 



135 00 
2,450 00 
5,950 00 



$10,760 00 



55,075 00 
2,520 00 

540 00 

385 00 

120 00 



2,005 00 



$10,645 00 



12,877 00 
3,480 00 

972 00 

1,465 00 

1.720 00 
408 00 

5.721 00 



306 00 $800 00 
240 00 

1,925 00 



4,356 00 
600 00 

735 00 

6,050 00 

12,580 00 
600 00 



.,467 00 



300 00 

300 00 
1,732 00 
4,760 00 



$26,643 00 

$1,206 00 

240 00 

4,956 00 

900 00 

900 00 

5,332 00 

11,390 00 
600 00 



,817 00 



$25,524 00 



*Amount paid from National Treasury 



Appropriations. 



113 



BUREAUS 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Total 
Budget 



Salary 



Current 
Expense and 
Student Aid 



Total 



Board and 
Room 



Total 
Salary 



CITY MISSIONS 
Central 

Campbell Settlement, 
Gary, Ind 

* Newberry Avenue Cen- 
ter, Chicago, 111 

Marcy Center, Chicago, 
111 

Peek Home, Polo, 111... . 

Total — Central. . . 

Central West 
East St. Louis Settle- 
ment, East St. Louis, 

111 

Epworth School, Webster 

Groves, Mo 

Mothers' Jewels Home, 
York, Neb 



$11,535 

12,050 

17,545 
10,024 



Total — Central West 

East Central 

Esther Hall, Cincinnati 
Ohio 

McCrum Community 
House and Oliver, Un- 
iontown, Pa 

Leisenring, Dunbar, Pa. . 

Total — East Central 

Friendship Home 

Friendship Home, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 



H,125 00 

1,210 00 

8,435 00 
2,019 00 



;i,154 00 



$7,787 
16,568 
20,796 



$15,789 00 

$4,345 00 
5,733 00 
5,199 00 



;,151 00 



$9,400 00 



Total Friendship 
Home 



Northeast Central 

Blodgett Community 
House, Hazleton, Pa. . 

Italian Settlement, Utica, 
N. Y _.. 

North Barre Community 
Center, Barre, Vt.. . 



Total — Northeast 
Central 



West 

Davis Esther Hall, Salt 

Lake City, Utah . . . 



4,205 
2,973 



$15,277 00 



$540 00 



1,810 00 
1,529 00 



$16,578 00 



!,049 00 



$8,049 00 



^,275 
8,211 
4,790 



$20,276 00 



$2,792 00 



1,879 00 



^6,410 00 

1,515 00 

4,110 00 
2,205 00 



$10,535 00 

2,725 00 

12,545 00 
4,224 00 



$14,240 00 

^,842 00 
1,860 00 
7,597 00 



$11,299 00 



51,995 00 
1,394 00 



$3,389 00 



987 00 $2,962 00 



$2,987 00 

$3,630 00 

3,106 00 

-2,135 00 



,871 00 



$812 00 



$30,029 00 

$6,187 00 

7,593 00 

12,796 00 



$26,576 00 



$540 00 



3,805 00 
2,923 00 



1,735 00 



5,005 00 
1,540 00 



$6,860 00 

1,210 00 

13,440 00 
3,559 00 



$9,280 00 

$2,520 00 
3,465 00 
4,235 00 



$25,069 00 

56,865 00 
9,198 00 
9,434 00 



$10,220 00 



$385 00 



1,155 00 
1,155 00 



$25,497 00 



$925 00 



2,965 00 
2,684 00 



$7,268 00 



$5,949 00 



$2,962 00 

$3,450 00 
3,980 00 
2,425 00 



',855 00 



$480 00 



$5,949 00 

$7,080 00 
7,086 00 
4,560 00 



$18,726 00 



,292 00 



,695 00 $6,574 00 



$2,220 00 



$2,220 00 

$1,925 00 
1,925 00 
1,540 00 



$5 90 00 



$770 00 



$5,207 00 



$5,207 00 

$5,555 00 
5,031 00 
3,675 00 



r,261 00 



$1,582 00 



*Amount paid from National Treasury. 



114 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



BUREAUS 



Bingham and Copper- 
field, Utah 

Marysvale, Utah 

Pavillion, Wyo 

Esther Hall, Ogden, Utah 

Highland Boy Commu- 
nity House, Bingham 
Canyon, Utah 

Iowa National Esther 
Hall, Des Moines, Iowa 

Rock Springs Deaconess 
Center, Rock Springs, 
Wyo 

Total— West 

Total for City Work 

HOSPITALS 

Brewster, Jacksonville, 
Fla 

Medical Mission Dispen- 
sary, Boston, Mass. . . 

Sibley Memorial, Wash- 
ington, D. C 

Total for Hospitals. 

INDIAN 

Navajo Methodist Mis- 
sion, Farmington, 
N. M 

Ponca Methodist Mis- 
sion, Ponca, Okla 

Potawatonii Methodist 
Mission, Mayetta, Kan. 

Yuma Indian Mission, 
Yuma, Ariz 

Total for Indian. . . . 

MEXICAN AND 
SOUTHWEST 

Harwood Girls' School, 
Albuquerque, N. M. . . 

Rose Gregory Houchen 
Settlement, El Paso, 
Te.xas 

Freeman Clinic and New- 
ark Hospital, El Paso, 
Texas 

Methodist Sanatorium, 
Albuquerque, N. M. . . 

Total for Mexican and 
Southwest 



176,779 00 

$52,887 GO 

19,627 00 

$560,000 00 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Total 
Budget 



Salary 



646 00 

406 00 

1,847 00 

3,800 00 



4,468 00 
20,846 00 

766 00 



$35,571 00 



$632,514 00 

$26,146 00 
2,995 00 
2,105 00 
2,584 00 



$33,830 00 

521,438 00 

6,936 00 

13,906 00 
39,107 00 



!1,387 00 



406 00 
406 00 
812 00 
812 00 



1,218 00 
700 00 

406 00 



;,572 00 



$52,375 00 

$9,212 00 
6,480 00 
4,300 00 



19,992 00 

57,318 00 
1 , 500 00 
1,460 00 
1,764 00 



12,042 00 

56,634 00 

2,977 00 

3,984 00 
4,172 00 



$17,767 00 



Current 
Expense and 
Student Aid 



Total 



180 00 



1,035 00 



3,050 00 



360 00 



105 00 



$46,850 00 



59,147 00 
6.000 00 



15,147 00 

15,828 00 

1,295 00 

495 00 

470 00 



$18,088 00 

$9,804 00 

3,234 00 

922 00 
2,935 00 



$16,895 00 



586 00 

406 00 

1,847 00 

812 00 



4,268 00 
700 00 

766 00 



$10,677 00 



599,225 00 

$9,212 00 
15,627 00 
10,300 00 



$35,139 00 

$23,146 00 
2,795 00 
1,955 00 
2,234 00 



530,130 00 

516,438 00 

6,211 00 

4,906 00 
7,107 00 



$34,662 00 



Board and 
Room 



385 00 



770 00 
770 00 



1,155 00 
385 00 

360 00 



$4,595 00 



$34,400 00 

$3,920 00 

2,520 00 

950 00 



$7,390 00 

$5,700 00 
240 00 
240 00 
240 00 



;6,420 00 

55,075 00 

1,925 00 

1,925 00 
1,925 00 



$10,850 00 



Total 
Salary 



791 00 

406 00 

1,582 00 

1,582 00 



2,373 00 
1,085 00 

766 00 



167 00 



^6,^75 00 

13,132 00 
9.000 00 
5,250 00 



$27,382 00 

13.018 00 
1,740 00 
1,700 00 
2.004 00 



$18,462 00 

111, 709 00 

4,902 00 

5,909 00 
6,097 00 



,617 00 



Appropriations. 



115 





APPROPRIATIONS 


Board and 
Room 


Total 


BUREAUS 


Total 
Budget 


Salary 


Current 
Expense and 
Student Aid 


Total 


Salary 


MOUNTAINEER 

Ethel Harpst Home, Ce- 
dartown, Ga 

McCarty Settlement, Ce- 
dartown, Ga 

Elizabeth Ritter Hall, 
Athens, Tenn 

Erie School-Aiken Hall 
and Walker Neighbor- 
hood House, Olive Hill, 
Kv 


$15,617 00 

1,940 00 

11,015 00 

15,810 00 
37,116 00 
31,502 00 


$2,869 00 

780 00 

1,705 00 

5,910 00 

8,601 00 

10,107 00 


$9,748 00 
1,060 00 
2,680 00 

5,550 00 


$12,617 00 
1,840 00 
4,385 00 

11,460 00 

8,601 00 

15,064 00 


$2,310 00 

385 00 

1,470 00 

4,060 00 
4,935 00 
4,480 00 


$5,179 00 
1,165 00 
3,175 00 

9,970 00 


Pfeiffer Junior College, 
Misenheimer, N. C. . . 


13,536 00 


Wood Junior College 
Mathiston, Miss 


4,957 00 


14,587 00 


Total for Mountain- 
eer 


$113,000 00 


$29,972 00 


$23,995 00 


$53,967 00 


$17,640 00 


$47,612 00 


NEGRO 

Cooperative 
Eliza Dee Hall, Austin, 
Texas 


$6,224 00 
6.015 00 
3,409 00 
1,239 00 

6,613 00 
13,490 00 

10,705 00 


$1,764 00 

2,390 00 

1,966 00 

484 00 

2,078 00 
3,480 00 

3,250 00 


$1,110 00 

2,225 00 

1,318 00 

505 00 

2,485 00 
1,210 00 

5,755 00 


$2,874 00 

4,615 00 

3,284 00 

989 00 

4,563 00 
4,690 00 

9,005 00 


$1,275 00 

1,680 00 

1,355 00 

70 00 

1,645 00 
2,275 00 

3,080 00 


$3,039 00 


Rust Hall, HollySprings, 
Miss 


4,070 00 


Faith Community Cen- 
ter, New Orleans, La. 

Italian Kindergarten, 
New Orleans, La 

Peck Hall and Gilbert 
Academy, New Or- 
leans, La 


3,321 00 
554J)0 

3,723 00 


Thayer Hall, Atlanta, Ga. 

Sager- Brown Home and 

School, Baldwin, La... 


5,755 00 
6,330 00 


Total Negro — Coop- 
erative 


$47,695 00 
$12,500 00 


$15,412 00 
$5,000 00 


$14,608 00 
$7,500 00 


$30,020 00 
$12,500 00 


$11,380 00 


$26,792 00 


Joint Administration 
With Board of Education 

Bennett College, Greens- 
boro N C 


$5,000 00 








Total Joint Adminis- 
tration with Board 


$12,500 00 

$14,405 00 
14,156 00 


$5,000 00 

$6,035 00 
5,206 00 


$7,500 00 

$3,170 00 
1,450 00 


$12 500 00 




$5,000 00 


North and South Caro- 
lina and Florida 

Allen Home and School, 
Asheville, N. C 

Boylan-Haven School, 
Jacksonville, Fla 


$9,205 00 
6,656 00 


$4,445 00 
3,850 00 


$10,480 00 
9,056 00 



116 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 





APPROPRIATIONS 


Board and 
Room 


Total 


BUREAUS 


Total 
Budget 


Salary 


Current 
Expense and 
Student Aid 


Total 


Salary 


Browning Home, Cam- 
den S. C 


24,348 00 


8,538 00 


2,810 00 


11,348 00 


6,820 00 


15 358 00 






Total for North and 
South Carolina 
and Florida 


$52,909 00 


$19,779 00 


$7,430 00 


$27,209 00 


$15,115 00 


$34,894 00 


Total for Negro Work 

PUERTO RICO AND 
NEW YORK 

George 0. Robinson 
School, San Juan, 
Puerto Rico 


$113,104 00 

$21,683 00 
5,000 00 

3,315 00 
300 00 


$40,191 00 
$7,938 00 


$29,538 00 

$9,245 00 
5,000 00 

375 00 


$69,729 00 

$17,183 00 
5,000 00 

915 00 
300 00 


$26,495 00 
$4,705 00 


$66,686 00 
$12 643 00 


Santo Domingo 




Alma Mathews House, 

New York City, N. Y. 

Japanese Bible Woman. . 


540 00 
300 00 


770 00 


1,310 00 
300 00 










Total for Puerto Rico 
and New York. . . 

REST HOMES 

Bancroft-Taylor, Ocean 
Grove, N. J 


$30,298 00 

$20,100 00 
5,910 00 

1,570 00 
500 00 
945 00 


$8,778 00 

$2,430 00 
1,080 00 

170 00 


$14,620 00 

$7,670 00 
880 00 


$23,398 00 

$10,100 00 
1,960 00 

170 00 


$5,475 00 

$1,540 00 
770 00 

105 00 
105 00 
105 00 


$14,253 00 
$3,970 00 


Robincroft, Pasadena, 
Calif 


1 850 00 


Chautauqua Mission 
House, Chautauqua, 
N. Y 


275 00 


Fenton Memorial, Chau- 
tauqua, N. Y 




105 00 


Thompson, Mt. Lake 
Park, Md 


170 00 




170 00 


275 00 








Total for Rest Homes 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

National Training School, 
Kansas City, Mo 


$29,025 00 
$25,383 00 


$3,850 00 
$7,558 00 


$8,550 00 
$7,325 00 


$12,400 00 
$14,883 00 


$2,625 00 
$6,930 00 


$6,475 00 
$14,488 00 


Total for Training 
School 


$25,383 00 

$5,255 00 
17,443 00 


$7,558 00 

$720 00 
1,500 00 


$7,325 00 

$100 00 
5,643 00 


$14,883 00 

$820 00 
7,143 00 


$6,930 00 

$385 00 
1,155 00 


$14,488 00 


Esther Hall, San Diego, 
Calif 


$1,105 00 


David and Margaret 
Home, La Verne, Calif. 


2,655 00 


Total . 


$22,698 00 


$2,220 00 


$5,743 00 


$7,963 00 


$1,540 00 


$3,760 00 


Total for Bureau 
Appropriations. . . 


$1,399,570 


$226,450 00 


$214,353 00 


$440,803 00 


$140,227 00 


$366,677 00 



Appropriations. 



117 



Wages 



Board and Room 



Total Compensation 



Board and Room for Wage 
Workers in The Woman's 
Home Missionary Society, 
estimated 



1,195 00 



il,493 00 



$134,688 00 



Board and Room cannot be estimated for Brewster Hospital, Medical Mission, Sibley 
Hospital, Maynard-Columbus Hospital. 



Included in above totals are the following appropriations to Co-operative Work with other 
Boards, Organizations, and Councils: 

American Peace Society $25 00 

Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C. — Co-operative with Board of Education 12,500 00 

Council of Women for Home Missions — Membership and Fees 850 00 

Commission on Church and Race Relations 50 00 

Commission on Interracial Co-operation 50 00 

Commission on Race Relations 100 00 

Interdenominational Council on Spanish-Speaking Work 100 00 

Latin American Conference 50 00 

Marine Mission 1 ,000 00 

Migrant Work 2 , 800 00 

Missionary Education Movement 200 00 

Mountain Workers' Conference 25 00 

National Council of Methodist Youth .' 250 00 

Religious Education Director — Indian Schools 450 00 

Salary of Chaplain— Hospital No. 66 1 ,800 00 

Santo Domingo 5,000 00 



118 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



CONFERENCE WORK 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Estimated 
Budget 



Conditional 



Total 



Baltimore — 

Deaconess Home, Washington, D. C 

Swartzell Children's Home, Washington, D. C 

Wo-Ho-Mis Lodge, Baltimore, Md 

Deaconess Home, Baltimore, Md 

California — 

Beulah Rest Home, Fruitvale, Calif 

Deaconess, San Francisco, Calif 

Central New York — 

Italian, Syracuse, N. Y 

Italian, Elmira, N. Y 

Central Pennsylvania — 

Deaconess Work, Harrisburg, Pa 

Italian Work, Altoona, Pa 

Coal Operatives, Kulpmont, Pa 

Summer School, Williamsport, Pa 

Administration 

Colorado — 

Deaconess Home, Denver, Colo 

Deaconess, Leadville, Colo 

Delaware — 

Friendship Home, Philadelphia, Pa 

Detroit — 

Esther Hall, Detroit, Mich 

Friendship Home, Detroit, Mich 

City Missions 

Frontier Fund 

Extension 

School of Missions, Lakeside, Ohio 

Waldenwoods Summer School 



Erie- 



Irene Maitland Deaconess Home, New Castle, Pa. 
Children's Home, Sheffield, Pa 



Genesee — 

Deaconess Home, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Friendship Home, Buffalo, N. Y. 



$3,500 00 

14,500 00 

25,000 00 

6,600 00 



15,000 00 
500 00 



1,500 00 
600 00 



3,300 00 

830 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 



1,400 00 
1,400 00 



2,250 00 



12,500 00 
2,500 00 
800 00 
300 00 
900 00 
400 00 
100 00 



1,600 00 
10,000 00 



6,300 00 
4,200 00 



$1,000 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,500 00 



1,000 00 
500 00 



1 , 500 00 
600 00 



3,300 00 

800 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 



1,400 00 
1,400 00 



1,175 00 



200 00 
,200 00 
800 00 
300 00 
800 00 
400 00 
100 00 



600 00 
5,000 00 



4,500 00 
200 00 



Appropriations. 



119 



CONFERENCE WORK 

Holston — 

Administration 

School of Missions 

Idaho — 

Administration 

Illinois — 

Settlement, Langleyville, 111 

Cunningham Children's Home, Urbana, 111 

Indiana — 

Deaconess Home, Indianapolis, Ind 

Glenburne, Linton, Ind 

lowa-Des Moines — 

Riverside Community House, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Bidwell Deaconess Home, Des Moines, Iowa . . . . 
Administration 

Kansas — 

Crawford County Larger Parish 

Mexicans, Argentine, Kansas 

Maine — 

Deaconess Work, Portland, Maine 

Summer School 

Michigan — 

Deaconess Home and Esther Hall, Grand Rapids 

Mich 

Olney Rest Home, Ludington, Mich 

Frontier Work 

Administration 

Minnesota — 

Girls' Club, St. Paul, Minn 

Missouri — 

Deaconess, Carthage District 

Daily Vacation Bible School and Mission Work, 

Kansas City District 

Interdenominational Work, St. Louis, Mo 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Estimated 
Budget 



Conditional Total 



$100 00 
150 00 



100 00 



1,500 00 
20,000 00 



2,500 00 
1,400 00 



1,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



1,000 00 
1,200 00 



1,000 00 
200 00 



8,000 00 
275 00 
450 00 
850 00 



8,000 00 



835 00 

2,250 00 
125 00 



SlOO 00 
50 00 



100 00 



1 , 500 00 
16,000 00 



2,300 00 
1 , 100 00 



1,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 



920 00 
1 , 130 00 



1,000 00 



2,130 00 

90 00 

450 00 

540 00 



300 00 



535 00 

2,000 00 
125 00 



$150 00 



100 00 



17,500 00 



3,400 00 



3,500 00 



2,050 00 



1,000 00 



3,210 00 



300 00 



2,660 00 



120 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



CONFERENCE WORK 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Budget I Conditional | Total 



Montana State — 

Administration 

Nebraska — 

City Missions, Omaha, Neb 

Summer Schools 

Administration 

Newark — 

Deaconess Home, Newark, N. J 

New England — 

Hattie B. Cooper Community Center, Roxbury 
Mass 



New England Southern — 

Silver Lake Community Center, Providence, R. I 



New Jersey — 

Deaconess Home and Community Center, Cam 
den, N. J 

New York East — 

Deaconess Home, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Italian Work, New York City, N. Y 

North-East Ohio- 
Deaconess Home and Community House, Cleve 

land, Ohio 

Italian Work, Youngstown, Ohio 

Guernsey Valley Larger Parish 

Deaconess Home, Bridgeport, Ohio 

Administration 

School of Missions, Lakeside, Ohio 

School of Missions, Bethesda, Ohio 

Settlement, Warren, Ohio 

North Indiana — 

Settlement, Fort Wayne, Ind 

Northwest Iowa — 

Deaconess at Helping Hand, Sioux City, Iowa. 
Deaconess at Wall Street, Sioux City, Iowa .... 
Industrial and Nursery Work, Sioux City, Iowa. . 
Administration 



$250 00 



8,900 00 
300 00 
200 00 


4,000 00 
300 00 
200 00 


2,300 00 


2,200 00 



4,800 00 



2,600 00 



5,500 00 



12,000 00 
9,000 00 



35,000 00 
4,250 00 
1 , 900 00 
5,000 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
50 00 
4,580 00 



3,350 00 



800 00 

1,300 00 

700 00 

300 00 



$250 00 



4,800 00 



2,600 00 



3,000 00 



4,000 00 
800 00 



5,200 00 
4,000 00 
1,500 00 
2,100 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
50 00 
2,780 00 



3,200 00 



700 00 

1,300 00 

700 00 

300 00 



Appropriations. 



121 



CONFERENCE WORK 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Estimated 
Budget 



Conditional 



Total 



Ohio- 
Administration 

Flower Esther Hall, Toledo, Ohio 

Friendly Center, Toledo, Ohio 

School of Missions, Lakeside, Ohio 

School of Missions, Lancaster, Ohio 

McKelvey Deaconess Home and Southside Settle 
ment House, Columbus, Ohio 

Oregon — 

Old People's Home, Salem, Ore 

Pacific Northwest — 

Japanese Work, Spokane, Wash 

Community Work, Tacoma, Wash 

Work at Wilkeson, Wash 



Philadelphia — 

Deaconess Home and Settlement, Philadelphia 

Pa 

Anna M. Skeer Rest Home, Newtown, Pa 

Esther Hall, Philadelphia, Pa 



Pittsburgh — 

Deaconess Home, Pittsburgh, Pa . . . . 
Elizabeth Bradley Home, Hulton, Pa. 

Travelers' Aid, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Social Worker, Morals Court 

Neighborhood Center 

Louise Home for Babies 



Rock River — 

Esther Hall, Chicago, 111 

Bohemian Work, Chicago, 111 

Lincoln Street Settlement, Chicago, 111 

Halsted Street Daily Vacation Bible School, Chi 

cago, III 

Administration ; 



Southern California — 

Conference Office and Administration. 
Methodist Hospital — Debt Reduction , 
Church of All Nations 



Southern Illinois — 

Holden Memorial Hospital, Carbondale, 111. 



$1,000 GO 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

600 00 

500 00 

12,000 00 



12,500 00 



950 00 

5,250 00 
1 , 100 00 



30,000 00 

300 00 

5,000 00 



14,000 00 
5,700 00 
200 00 
1,320 00 
1 , 300 00 
8,000 00 



10,000 00 

1,300 00 

750 00 

900 00 
250 00 



5,500 00 

25,000 00 

600 00 



30,000 00 



^1,000 00 

1 , 000 00 

4,500 00 

600 00 

500 00 

4,500 00 



1 , 000 00 



900 00 

2,500 00 

800 00 



28,500 00 
300 00 
800 00 



8,500 00 
2,000 00 
200 00 
1,320 00 
1,300 00 



1 , 500 00 
300 00 



900 00 
250 00 



5,500 00 

25,000 00 

600 00 



1 , 000 00 



12,100 00 



1,000 00 



4,200 00 



29,600 00 



13.320 00 



2,950 00 



31,100 00 



1,000 00 



122 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



CONFERENCE WORK 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Estimated 
Budget 



Conditional 



Total 



Southwest Kansas 

Mexican Work, Lyons, Kansas. . . . 
Mexican Work, Wichita, Kansas. . . 

Esther Hall, Wichita, Kansas 

Deaconess Home, Wichita, Kansas. 



Upper Iowa — 

Bohemian Work, Cedar Rapids, Iowa . 



West Virginia — 

Minnie Nay Settlement, Benwood, W. Va 

Engle Settlement, Fairmont, W. Va 

Scott's Run Settlement, W. Va 

Holloway Deaconess Home, Bridgeport, W. Va . 

Willa Parsons Community House, Clarksburg 

W. Va 



West Wisconsin — 

Deaconess — Italian W^ork. 



Wilmington — 

Riddle Memorial Deaconess Home, Wilmington, 
Del 

Mary Todd Gambrill Neighborhood House, Wil- 
mington, Del 



Wyoming—^ 

Children's Home and Conference Deaconess Work, 

Binghamton, N. Y 

Camp Hiawatha, Lake Ariel, Pa 



Total for all Conferences 

GRAND TOTAL FOR ALL APPROPRIATIONS. 



$600 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 
3,400 00 



2,025 00 



3,000 00 
2,200 00 
2,200 00 
5,000 00 

240 00 



830 00 

3,000 00 
1 , 600 00 



18,000 00 
1,600 00 



$500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 



400 00 



2,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 
1,100 00 

240 00 



830 00 



2,600 00 
800 00 



6,000 00 
400 00 



$2,500 00 



400 00 



7,340 00 



830 00 



3,400 00 



6,400 00 



$507,810 00 



$232,565 00 



$232,565 00 



$826,402 00 



Departments 



Wesleyan Service Guild 

Mrs. Merle N. English, Secretary 

105 East 22d Street, New York, New York 
Guild Office: 1630 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 

A LMOST everyone in Tlie Woman's Home Missionary Society now knows 
that the Central Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild is its national 
governing board. The Guild constitution printed on page 271 of this Annual 
Report explains how the members of the Central Committee are elected and 
what they are supposed to do. 

The method of electing conference and local Guild secretaries will be 
found on page 273. Have you ever been perplexed about Guild reports, 
divis'ion of Guild funds, or kinds of membership in the Guild ? You will 
find the answers to these questions and many others in this interesting con- 
stitution. We commend it to you for careful reading. 

A packet of essential material has been prepared for World Service 
chairmen. This, together with the AcMevement Chart, will also be of 
interest to those auxiliary women who are interested in promoting the Guild 
in their own churches. The packet includes suggestions for the presenta- 
tion of the home textbook, for the presentation of the foreign textbook, 
pamphlets on each of the national Guild projects, and other valuable helps. 
The Achievement Chart offers possibility of a pictorial record of the extent 
to which each unit is achieving its goals. For example, on the chart in one 
place is printed the term "Sister Members." The idea is to secure pictures 
of the "Sisters," a snapshot or small picture from a missionary paper or 
report, and paste them on the chart at this point. Complete directions for 
using the chart accompany it. This packet and the Achievement Chart may 
be secured for $1 from the Central Office, 1630 Hinman Avenue, Evanston 
Illinois. 

In addition to the large number of women in both missionary societies 
who subscribe to the Bulletin, the Central Committee is sending compli- 
mentary subscriptions to certain officers in both societies. This interesting 
monthly news sheet is growing in popularity among the Guild members as 
well as the auxiliary members. It is not intended that the Bulletin should 
take the place of any other Methodist r)ublication — the Advocates, the 
Woman's Missionary Friend, Woman's Home Missions, or the Stewardship 
Spokesman — but leather that it should help to create in the business and 
professional women of Methodism a desire for more facts concerning the 
work of the church and in the hope that subscriptions to these other maga- 
zines will follow. Subscriptions should be sent to the Guild Office at the 
address above. The rates are: individual subscription, one year, $0.35; 
individual subscription, three years, $1; club subscriptions, ten or more 
copies to one address for one year, each $0.25; back copies, each $0.03; com- 
bination individual subscription to Bulletin and Stewardship Spokesman, 
one year, $0.50. 

In 1938-39, special attention will be given to the promotion of practical 
stewardship among Guild members. Plans for personal budget suggestions 
are under way and will be submitted to Guild members. 

Special attention will also be given to the promotion of book review 
teas, membership in the Guild travel club, and the interesting supply projects 
which will be undertaken by the units this year. 

Guilds are sending magazines of religious education to all institutions 
of The Woman's Home Missionary Society that have requested them. Be- 
cause the Central Committee is able to secure special rates on many of 
these magazines when large numbers are ordered, units are asked to send 
what they can out of their contingent fund, or from some other source, to 
Miss Mae Wilson, treasurer, Orrington Hotel, Evanston, Illinois. Any gift 
will be acceptable. The subscription prices average about $1 a year. 

The Central Office at 1630 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, Illinois, continues 
to meet a big need. All inquiries concerning Guild organization, procedure, 
and program will be cared for carefully and promptly. 

123 



124 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Enrollment in 
Schools and Camps 
(Last Year) 1937.. 



W3 -^ f-l CO W^COiM 



»0C0OC30«0 



How Many Study 
Courses Used 



t-- O CO CO CO c^ 
■^ lO ?D CO 1-H 



GOt>.OOCS|COt^COW5'^ 

CO CO »oc^ »-< 



Number of 
Readers of 

''Woman's 
Home Missions' 



(N 0-<J»-^ GO 

-<J< lO T-H i-H t* 



■^ »0 C^ -^ Tt< 

0»-<lC'-HC^^ 



C^ CO *-l OS -^ c^ 



oiOosooOioostOeo 

OIMCOC^^HC^iO<NCO 



Total Sub'rs to 
•'Woman's Home 
Missions," in- 
cluding new 



i-H r-t <X> -^ <— " 



lO M CO O 05 CO 



1— t ■ O *— I lO OO CO Ol CO »o 



Amount of 
Money in Mite 
Boxes 



liO OCO'-> t^ 
■* 0"^CO GO 



^ (NO^ 



Number Mite 
Boxes Distrib- 
uted 



CO *-• CO CO O 



Christian Steward- 
ship (Total Num- 
ber of Tithers) 



CO -^ OS i-H ^ »o 

-^r oi r^ CO i— ' (N 

IM 1-* lO C^4^H 



CO OOOIOKM 



':C> CD -^ O C^ C 



Grand Total 
Membership 
Queen Esthers, 



D00C^OC0Oi0OC0a5C00i'^X)'-<CCCDt--C0C0'L0>— 'lOCOiOTt'CDOlCl- 
HOOcO'^C^OOS'— <i— "lOO'OC^jOOiOasiOOiCOCOCOOi-^ri^iOCTiCOC 
Hi— icD CO CDC30 CO"— •'— 'CO CD ■^ tJii— it^OCSTPi— i ■^t 



■<C<IOi^DCO'^C/JOOOO<--«<— (CDr-i 
DO0i05:Dt--0i'^cD0;«— tiO-^ 
* »-« iC t--. iO >— « Tp •-• CO -^ 



Total Honorary 
Members 



■ O ■ ^ ■ ^ CO 



No. of New 
Paid Members 
Since July 1, 
1937 



CO C» i— O tC 



t^ t-^ CO 00 CO 
O »0 <M 00 



CO C^ O ■ CO t^ ■ ■ lO TT O • -COCO 



^i-HC^i^CO 



Oj iC "<*' OS C<J t-" CO 
1-H *-^ CO OS t^ CO CO 



C^Ob*COcOC 
C^ -H CD-*J*MC 



How Many of 
Your Circles 
Are Joint 
(Home & For.) 



»0 CC CjO 05 t^ ?D so • ■ ■ C^ t^ ■ M -.I. CO O -"T »-H ^H CO .CO 

^H CO 



Total Queen 
Esther Circles 



:D»0(>J»0»0»OCO'»'COOcoa>05C^C^lcDir3^3*MCOQO»-<05(MCOOiOO.^^C^C^COU^»/5»-<'-'CO^ 
'— 'iO CO COOO CO ^ CO .^ Cfl iCkCGOUt^H^H T-i.^1— «,— 1»0 t^-^»-Hi-H .« 



No. of New Cir- 
cles Since July 
1,1937 



f— I CO CO 1— « c^ ■ CO O •— • W5 ■ ^ CO ■ .—, CO 00 »— t lO CO O CO 03 .^ Cs| ^ CO O 00 •-< ^ 00 ^H TJ1 t^ »o 05 -co ■ M 



^ C3 



af« 



■ ^ j^ j5 is- 



>.s « 



5'p, 



n-r =3 61 



3 Jj-frt 

3oa3f 



M ° a 

«|-|||l.a.ao 



M : 



c a 2 . - 

JwkM 
gi s e s & s s 



» . tdl t£ P V3 ■^■ 

^ _i-j c c «3 t; ,^ 
^ 't: r-rT Tt"! !t! .5: ^> 



o o 

& s 

zz 



Number. 



^-((Meo'^wieot^oooiO— ^c^co'^iocot^oooiO»-t(Mco'*iocor^ooc»OrH(MeO'<**u5cot^Q005 0-Hc^ 

T-,^H^r-lf-n-i,-H^Ht-n-»CSC«Cqc^CSC^CqC^Cs|CS|COCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCO-*'^'^ 



Departments. 



125 



Enrollment in 
Schools and Camps 
(Last Year) 1937.. 



IO»OCOO(MO-hOcO(MC 



How Many Study 
Com'ses Used 



s -^Ji lO «D O O t^ C^ O 

' 00 CO c^ rj* -*' C^ CO -(M 



■OSOiOOOtO^O'^ 



Number of 
Readers of 
''Woman's 
Home Missions' 



OtO-^J^COC^OiOOOOsOt^ 
CO '<J'CO0CCOt^00'«S»ir5t^ 



■ OOJCOC^ c^ 



iOCi»OCOCO«t?d 



Total Sub'rs to 
"Woman's Home 
Missions," in- 
cluding new... . 



■ ^H ■«}* 00 CR i-H «0 
- »0 ^ CO -^ CO 



■t^cO»0»-«0-*'^^-^CO'-H 



Amount of 
Money in Mite 
Boxes 



Number Mite 
Boxes Distrib- 
uted 



oo»-H^^oi^'-<asosioco 

02'^COOOt*0'^i/5lOOO 
:DOco^«oco»— 'OOC^ 



(Mio«3r^ -oooo -oooio-^ 

lO CO 00 OO .OCOt^ ■QO'«*'iO(N 
-"J* CD ■ (M CO ^H . 1^ (M ^H 



■ lO CO»ft 00 o 



■ 10 030^ 



■ CD O CO CO 00 «D "~ ^ 



— o I 



CM u:> o t>- o 00 ^ cj I eo 

eo ^^ CM *-" 00 r^ 



■ 0> O 00 t^ O 00 w t _ 

■ CM »-l t^ Tf CD U5 CO «-" ■^ 



Christian Steward- 
ship (Total Num- 
ber of Tithers) 



■ 05 ^^ 00 CO 



Grand Total 
Membership 
Queen Esthers 



^HOOkracOCM-^OOr^CMt^OSCOCDOt^OOCOCOCOCD 

00»O<— 'OOOO^^QOCDCOOCnCMir^cOOCM-^ — 

OO 05 •««« t^ CO -^ *-« O CO ^H CO T-l o c 



) o CM -^r 05 CO CD 



■^a* CO t^ CM lo 



J*t^CMCM^*OCMOu:iCMl^Cr. ^-^ 

.lOCDt-HTTCDr^oOOOOO^^OCM^H 
^ CO *^ CD ^H CM CO 



Total Honorary 
Members 



I Oi -co - TJ< ■ Oi 



No. of New 
Paid Members 
Since July 1, 
1937 



■ 00^ 00 OOO f-i 

■ CO CO Oi CO o »« 
— 1 — > U5 



D O 00 O CM ■>»< -H O 
5COO OOO-^ ^ CM 



■ ^^ O CO ^H o 






D to 05 CM CM 



How Many of 
Your Circles 
Are Joint 
(Home &For.) 



.— .-I lO OO CD CM CO i-" t^ O CO O ■ -^ OS »0 
^H CM CM CM CD CM ^H ■ .-i CM -^ 



■CO -^H 



■ CO 0« CM CO U3 



Total Queen 
Esther Circles 



IiOCMCOCD*-HCM»005COOS^-t^i— '»CCD'^t^-^iO 



•— « t'COCOCO^iiO lOCO^^C 



>Ci ^ 



No. of New Cir- 
cles Since July 
1, 1937 



Number. 



i^~i-^ai^^t^ - oo - CT CO F^ »o ^H as oo .-^ cm 



■ r^ ■«*' CD CM CD 



■^^COOO CO 



irt 05 lO »0 t 



: as CO -^ CO ^H 



CM iO .-.^ c 



■ CM t^ CO CO U5 -^ CM CO CM OO 



2-M 

.2i>^.2«i 

BS cO.S S a Ov5 

■oj^.gsz::'^^ 

l_JMH-. J^ S £ ? -S E£ 






■ — .5 






OU. £ i; S ^ ^ 
jS J3 _c _a j3 j= -c ^ 






Cob 

~- ^ c ^ «» 



<»OCOt^00050rHCMCO-*»OCOt 



"t^t^t^t^t^C^yOQOOOC 



126 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Grand Total. 



CO o O CO ro 
o CM r-- •-*• c^ 

^ 00 30 '^' OO 
— « Cft--" »o 



SO^OCCCOO^lOC 



_....„^., _.-^0^-'— 'r^iM0iO»f5Q:OO"^»0C0i0OCM»0e0»0C 

C-ICOCC-^iM i-hOi-h as .-.Oi"-"-" CM "' 



J — . -O — ' c^» 



Value of Supplies. 



O t^ t^ C'^ fO 

F-< ^D CM Oi f-* 



o ^)< ' 


00 • 


o 










lO • 


to 


CO 







CMO»00 

lOt-- CO •-< ■ lO 



Total Cash . 



lO O ^ OS lO 

OC' o O ■'-< t^ 

^ to 00 1-1 t^ 
^^ Oa »-< 'f** 



iCCOOOOCOOiO 



I'-'CO'-'lOTfOiCM 



CS),— it^,— «o'^I>'^t^t~^OW3'^00 



Ot^COiOO>Ct^OO»0»OCM»CiOCMOf— lOCMiO 

_ W3-^00'-<cOt~-Oi0500t^COlCiO'^r^r--tOCM03'^ 

i000Q0»-<i-Ht^'-*«Ot-^Q0»-<CMTt<i0CM»O'^b-l0CM05CMC0C0'— I 

CM^=DOOCM^OC^COOOCO^^a3'^aieDCOCOTri>*^"^Cl"^t^ 



Cash Supplies. 



Total Budget. 



ooooo 

'-' O O lO lO 



>— « lO O CM "**^ 



Conference Work. 



Mite Boxes. 



^r o "^ CO c 

y& »0 CM ■' 



Thank Offering. 



«DCM '-it^ 



Lenten Ottering . 



OiOTp o 



iC t- O '-"-< 



^OCOOOi->i 



Oi-fkO'^COOl^CiC 
05 O O Oi CM i-" 



O cob- CM 

co^o^o 



CD OO ■^ uia lO t--. o 
CO CC ■«J' t^ '— ' to o 

»— I Tt< Tt* r-< r^- CO »o 



CMCMOOOOOOOCOCO 

oooc^iOaii>-»oocococo 



1 O -^ o: i-" I 






CM W3 

to-<*» 



00 CO 



• CM • iC«0 

• Oi 'Oi CM 



District Contingent. 



Conf. Contingent. 



O lO 

lOCO 

OO OS 






WSOOiO'-'OOCMCOOOiOOiO^O 
t^OOCOCMOCCOCMCO^HC^lCOcoIr^r^ 

i-Ht-i^h -* 1-h O W5 OS O OC t-i '^ -^ 
CO T-l ^-1 COC<ICOCM '-' 



• ^O CO O 00 o> 



Dues. 



O O »0 CO 1— I 

CO-**- ooos^ 
t- iC QOCM t^ 
«© CM T-l 



OCOOOOCOOOOCSOiOCMCOOO 



iCC'IOiO'^CMOO 
CM'-'-^OiCO-^t^CO'-HOiOO 
OCM iCCMiO'*'^-*^'" 



O0sC0=00iO»0'^C?iOOO*0'— ''^'^«0»— " 



OOOO0COU5OOOO*0CMOO»0r^i0 



C0'-<Oi00iCC^'<riOir5cOOcOt~^00OiOiO3COOSt--CMTj'OiC0C0C0»or- 

r-lC0CMC0CMO'*"^'-'03»-i:0C0CMTrT-»C0C00iCM'— icOCOt^COTTiOr- 

CO CM CM COCO-^CM CM CM CO CM CM i-H 



-9.25 SS ■ 



r^ ?= r^ -e fe'SE- 



>. 5 c3 



•13T3 J3 
CCS;.. 



c o 



35 c'm e'sc-" c ->^ S 55 H tt; ►*< "^ '^ ►" '^ 



Number. 



T-IC'IC*3'^»0tC»t^000iO^H(McC'<J'»O«0t^00asO^H(MC0"^»OC0t 



SO'-'<MCO'^iOCOt 



Departments. 



127 



Grand Total. 



(M CO ^- O t^ QO C^J CO CQ CO t:* »ft CO •-< .-. 



cO(Mc<)OOiOOOh-t^COCOoOO 
»— I C- '^ »-< CC »C t— • »0 C) '^ 05 »0 W3 -^ 

txr^coc^cot^t^^CTcoiiioscO'— « 
»c ^r c^ >-H i-« c^ »o 



IS 



Value of Supplies. 



^^— ■OOcotOoou^csjc 
■oOGOoocsi^'-'O:)'-': 

■4 <M GO C-1 «D O f-l CO --O C 
1^ CO »-i -rr 









. 




■«>05 


•a>M 






r^ :0 























-eoooot^o>e<iTt*t^c^Oi^oot-"Oooooo 

500Q0OOC0CS0SC^O«-«0000CDO'— 't^iCO 



c0(Ni0OO»AOOt^r^C0'-'U3O 
^-*iOOl^c0I>*O"^»CIM00Ci-^ 

,— iiOtt*"— icOiOi— 'OX'>— "OiCO^-^ 
CCO-^C^C0t^t*>0'0C0i0-Tj<O'-H 



Total Cash . 



coiooooooococsosc^O' 

t^'^t^'— 'l>.c^co05l^(^CC(McOcoOiOOfO'^0 

lOOOkOiOOGOOOCOCOC"^*^^^"^'* - - - 

i-H iC CO d CO t'- ^H c 

i-H lO CO <M "M 






oi»-< C^ O M 

CO GO Oi »C -^ 



Cash Supplies. 



40 O 



■ oo 
■Oco 



Total Budget. 



I>-OOOt^(M<=iCOOOCO 
COOOOOCOOC^IGO-* 



''OOOC^IiOOOOt^C 



CD O CO CO Tf CO 



OOtO 
CI (N 



O 0*0 iJtt ^ (M O 
O O CO O^ O GO o 

en O-^ OcoiM — < 
O CO -^ O "^ 



Conference Work. 



Mite Boxes. 



Oi GO O 
CO CD CO 







o 
o 


w 






CO 


r^ 








m 



OOOOOsO^OTfO 



co^ c^^ c 



Thank Offering . 



ooooo 



OcO^t^ 



Lenten Offering . 



OOOCOCOi-HOCOC^JcOiO 
O"^C0>0t^'— "(--.iM'^f-HCO 

»-H.-HTt<OOTt<C^lOt^CDC^O 



District Contingent. 



05C0 



OO00OC30 



IOCOCOIO»OCS1CO<MC^COO 

o*ooiaicor-'-iciiociO 



ooccoo 



Conf. Contingent. 



iM CO -^ CO C 



D lO CO lO O CO 



1— i'^iOO'0000»COOC^»«0 

cooO'^Ocoo'^occooeocD-^ 



Dues. 



OO^OrrOlTfO'-HOOOOOiOCOOiCOOO 
iOt^*Mt— C^W5'-H00OS'^»C»0'-'CJs-^OOc0OO 

Ooo'^t^'-"as-^coO'-'Oi>— 'oococoiO'-'r^»-«w5 

■^C^GOOOTT'^ClCOOCCOOScOt^'^O'— lOJ^ti— <CO 
CO t^ C^ C^l .— " C^ OS •-< f-H ^ lO CO 



*cooo»c 

CO CO OC*C CO 
COCSl C4 



«3^ 



5^ S 



4) C O O 






a ^ ^ > > > 



0;=:. 



"^CCCCOCC' 



• C C-' 



^ c. ^-^ § "^ "^ "? 1^ ^ 



;^;^;^:2:ooccuC^c:eHCc;ccc«c«o3ttii£a:aic»b-HH;^;^^>"'^ 



3£6 



Number. 



CO^«W3COt^CX)OiO'-<( 



-lOCOh^GCOsO'—e 



■ GO OC OOQO 



128 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Department of Young People 

Mrs. Mildred Allen Knight, Secretary 

39 Green Village Road, Madison, New Jersey 

'T'HE department has closed a very busy year with a feeling of satisfaction. 
The beginning of this year showed a depleted membership, reduced in- 
come, and many new leaders. It demanded new policies and new foundations. 
While the task seemed great and many leaders were discouraged, a spirit 
of good will, optimism, and enthusiasm took hold of the department. Too 
much cannot be said in praise of the experienced secretaries who have 
stayed by during this reconstruction period and of the new secretaries who 
were so willing to learn and work. The successes and failures of confer- 
ences appear on the following pages in the statistical report. However, 
this is a most incomplete and inadequate picture. A printed report is a 
poor showing of the hours, days, weeks, months of thought, prayer, and 
study of the leaders; of the miles traveled, regardless of weather, roads, or 
comfort; of the meetings held, small, large, good, dull; of the letters written. 
Nor does it fairly depict the time and energy, dollars and cents spent. With 
the age shifts among youth groups, the change in residence to and from 
college, the increasing demand of the world on youth's time, we have strug- 
gled to maintain a place. Constantly do school, pleasure, and work close 
in and threaten to crowd church out. It is then with a sense of accomplish- 
ment that Queen Esther leaders survey the year's work. 

Membership in the department has been our great concern. Undoubtedly 
we have the greatest turnover in the membership ranks. This is very nat- 
ural and logical, and makes our figures all the more exciting and the work 
harder. We promote members every year to auxiliary, Wesleyan Service 
Guild, and Young Woman's auxiliary; we lose by age limits, removal to 
college, and "weary in well-doing." Yet, in spite of this, we move ahead. 
New members gained during this year were 7,085; promotions, 1,397; lost, 
5,302. Nevertheless our report of a total membership of 31,566 and a net 
increase of 389 is an answer to prayer, faith, and good work. We feel that 
the tide has been stemmed and the department's membership is definitely 
on the increase. Four hundred new organizations were secured. This al- 
ways means advance because it is new territory — new church groups in- 
terested and an extended outreach of missionary endeavor. 

Twenty-four confei'ences made an increase in number of organizations 
and forty-one in members; sixteen of these made increases in both. Total 
amount given by the department was $56,673.49. The largest amount 
was given by North-East Ohio Conference, and second largest by Ohio 
Conference. Philadelphia Conference led in amount given for Supplies. 
South Carolina Conference had largest number of new subscribers for 
Woman's Home Missions, and Ohio Conference second. Congratulations 
and recognition are given the many conferences and Circles completing 
the goals and placing every book on the bookshelf. 

The department had kept pace with the youth movement of our denomi- 
nation and other groups. A study has been made of aims of youth and 
progress of activities. We are fortunate in having nine Queen Esthers 
and one leader at the National Council of Methodist Youth at Boulder. 
It is with great satisfaction that the department reports progress this year, 
and it has great hope, ambitions, and eagerness as it looks forward to 
the new year. 

I believe in youth 

As the friend of truth. 

He is bold as the knights of old were bold 

To salvage the best that the centuries hold. 

Who can the fact of his faith gainsay? 

He is holy in youth's intrepid way! 

— M. S. M. in the International Journal of Religious Education. 



Departments. 



129 



17 Total of All Moneys Sent 
to District or Confer- 
ence Treasurer, Plus 
Cash Value of Supplies. 
(Add columns 3,4, 7, 
8, 13, and 16.) 



O«o»ooaco«o»ctec 



oo-^OdO'-HC^r^r^t-cor^ioooocoooocooj'— <C- - — ,_ 

»OOCC"XiOO'^C0'tfC0C0'^00'^'MC^00'^0Si0W500.-HOS»0C0CS|'' 
tA kt^ ^^ r<l 'n r^ f>j t^ r^ ^n ^ rw ^ A. 



i ,-1 -^ ,-. CO 



16 Supplies to W. H. M.S. 
Institutions. (Cash 

value of box plus 

postage.) 



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00 CO C<J CO CO 50 

rH • 05 O CO CO 05 CO 
■^ «D t^ U5 CO 



15 Special Offerings at 
Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas or Easter for the 
L.S.B 



14 How Much of the Little 
Sister - Brother was 
Raised in Mite Boxes 



o«o<M r^ o^ - 



CO CO CO Tf CO o 






13 Pledge for Little Sister- 
Brother. (All Mite 
Box Money and Special 
Offerings) 



or^iooooo^Hoo 
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12 Number of Subscriptions 
to Junior NeighboTS. 



•^■«**coc35050ia5r..»o 
r^ ,-1 »-t (M »^ -^ CO CO 



COC^C»^t^C^ir5<MOS^^C 
C^ 05 « C^ •<** CO CO Csl c 



11 Number of Bands Using 
"Road of the Loving 
Heart" 



CO-^ -t* 03 



J »/5 -<*« 1^ r^ O »-< 



10 Number of Bands Using 
Textbooks 



kO-^OC0-^C^(M00^HC<l 
^H 1-1 C^^HCO^H-H 



9 Number Receiving W. H. 
M. S. Instruction from 
Whom No Dues Were 
Received 



CO OiOOOi 



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8 Amount Received from 
Jewel Life Members at 
One Dollar Each 



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7 Total Dues Received 
(This Must Agree With 
Membership) 



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6 Number of Paid Mem- 
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5 Number of Bands. 



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4 Amount Received from 
Junior Life Members at 
Ten Dollars Each.. 



3 Total Dues Received 
(This Must Agree With 
Membership) 



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lCW3i0»0i0OC^OU0t^t>-OO»'3OO 

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2 Number of Paid Mem- 
bers 



acocncot^cocoosco 



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1 Number of Bands. 



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t^COCO^HO-*r-t^-MOOCO-*t^»-«eOCO 

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Number. 



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130 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



17 Total of All Moneys Sent 
to District or Confer- 
ence Treasurer, Plus 
Cash Value of Supplies. 
(Add columns 3, 4, 7, 
8, 13. and 16) 



16 Supplies to W. H. M.S. 
Institutions. (Cash 
value of box plus 
postage.) 



15 Special Offerings at 
Thanksgiving, Christ- 
mas or Easter for the 
L.S.B 



14 How Much of the Little 

Sister - Brother was 
Raised in Mite Boxes. 



13 Pledge for Little Sister- 
Brother. (All Mite 
Box Money and Special 
Offerings) 



12 Number of Subscriptions 
to Junior Neighbors.. 

11 Number of Bands Using 
"Road of the Loving 
Heart" 

10 Number of Bands Using 
Textbooks 

9 Number Receiving W. H. 
M. S. Instruction from 
Whom No Dues Were 
Received 

8 Amount Received from 
Jewel Life Members at 
One Dollar Each 

7 Total Dues Received, 
(This Must Agree With 
Membership) 

6 Number of Paid Mem- 
bers 

5 Number of Bands 

4 Amount Received from 
Junior Life Members at 
Ten Dollars Each 

3 Total Dues Received. 

(This Must Agree With 
Membership) 

2 Number of Paid Mem- 
bers 

1 Number of Bands 



Number. 



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1-H '^r --H lo 



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O-^i— ii-HioOOOJi— iOI>-Ot--OCO(MO"^iM "-H CO'-' 



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■^ CO »-< <M Oi i-H rH i-H CO CO 



05cocOi-HOi-<j<coGoas"^ooeooi>--^co 



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t^cocoososr^-rji-^' 



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5 1-H GO CO CO CO C^ CO 



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1-H OscO (M* 



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C<I (M rH CO »C »-( 1-H ■^ CO »-< OS CO •-* CO CO O I^ 



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Departments. 



131 



17 Total of All Moneys Sent 
to District or Confer- 
ence Treasurer, Plus 
Cash Value of Supplies. 
(Add columns 3, 4, 7 
8, 13, and 16.) 



16 Supplies to W. H. M. S. 
Institutions. (Cash 
value of box plus 
postage.) 



15 Special Offerings at 
Thanksgiving, Christ^ 
mas or Easter for the 
L.S.B 



14 How Much of the Little 
Sister - Brother was 
Raised in Mite Boxes. . 



13 Pledge for Little Sister- 
Brother. (All Mite 
Box Money and Special 
Offerings) 



12 Number of Subscriptions 
to Junior Neighbors,. 

11 Number of Bands Using 
"Road of the Loving 
Heart" 

10 Number of Bands Using 
Textbooks 

9 Number Receiving W. H. 
M. S. Instruction from 
Whom No Dues Were 
Received 

8 Amount Received from 
Jewel Life Members at 
One Dollar Each 

7 Total Dues Received 
(This Must Agree With 
Membership) 

6 Number of Paid Mem- 
bers 

5 Number of Bands 

4 Amount Received from 
Junior Life Members at 
Ten Dollars Each 

3 Total Duos Received, 
(This Must Agree With 
Membership) 

2 Number of Paid Mem 
bers 

1 Number of Bands 



0O^^OiOC0OO»0»'3OO»O»OOC0O»U3O 



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5t^ c^co oc^co-n'-^ 






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lO o o »o t^»C "O 



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Number. 



t ? ? ? 

£ S S S 

3 3 3 C 

o o o 



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■ — - - - « ^ 

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3^*iococ>-ooc>o»-«e 



QOCD!C»COtOt^t^t^t*t^t^t^t»t^t*"0000C 



132 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Junior Department 

Mrs. Austin L. Prynn, Secretary 
26 Broad Street, Pittston, Pennsylvania 

"And when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him 
gifts."— St. Matthew 2. 11. 

TTHE Juniors, who have been engaged in a Treasure Hunt along the Road 

of the Loving Heart during the past twelve months, wish to extend their 
appreciation to conference and district officers, local leaders, and all others 
who so willingly guided them in their hunting. 

The treasures, which were found in every conceivable place, are listed 
in the accompanying report and are a testimony of what children can ac- 
complish under proper leadership. It is always a source of deep satis- 
faction to be able to report increases, and as a result of our Treasure 
Hunt we have more bands, more members, more subscriptions, and more 
money than last year. There is also a very noticeable increase in the 
number of bands vising the study course. 

Eighty-two conferences again reported Junior bands, and fifty-one of 
these had an increase in total givings over last year. The conference award 
for new bands was earned by Illinois, Mrs. Edgar Love, secretary. Honor- 
able mention went to California, North Indiana, and New Jersey. The 
conference award for new members was earned by Southwest Kansas, Mrs. 
A. M. Pammenter, secretary. Honorable mention went to Illinois, Wyo- 
ming, and Ohio. The conference award for the greatest increase in the little 
Sister-Brother pledge was earned by West Virginia, Mrs. D. I. Whiting, 
secretary. Honorable mention went to Lexington, Upper Iowa, and Mis- 
souri. The conference award for new subscriptions to Junior Neighbors 
was earned by Wisconsin, West Virginia, and Genesee. The conference 
award for the largest display of posters, based on number of bands, at the 
national meeting was earned by North Indiana, Mrs. Lester Weir, secretary. 
Honorable mention went to lowa-Des Moines, Pacific Northwest, and North- 
west Iowa. 

It is always a joy to include our own paper. Junior Neighbors, in a 
Junior report. To find a paper, better planned to meet the needs of both 
leader and child, would not be possible. For fifteen years Miss Bertha M. 
Stephenson, editor of Junior Publications, has given her best to fill its 
pages with the best of devotional material, stories, poetry, and other 
features. We deeply regret that she feels the necessity of relinquishing 
her work. Wherever she may go, she will have the love of a great group 
of adults and children who have learned to know her through the pages 
of Junior Neighbors. We are glad to welcome, as Miss Stephenson's suc- 
cessor, Mrs. H. F. Young, who is known to readers of Junior Neighbors, 
as she has been a frequent contributor. 

Love of home missions and love of children gave Mrs. W. W. Welch a 
vision of need which prompted her to organize a band of Mothers' Jewels 
in New Philadelphia, Ohio, just twenty-six years ago. Today she is still 
leader of that band, though many of the 117 members are children of her 
"Jewels" of other days. During this period she has turned over for use in 
the mother society $5,670.17. Such a record of achievement should inspire 
other women to greater service. 

Our year of treasure hunting is passed, but the need and our response 
continue. The Master said, "Ye are my friends if ye do whatsoever I com- 
mand you." The Juniors will seek to earn the right to be called Friends of 
Jesus this year by accepting as commands the fifteen items of work which 
have been assigned to them. 

"Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's work?" (St. Luke 2. 49.) 



Standing Committees 

Christian Citizenship 

Ada Townsend, Chairman 

1719 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 

'T'HE outstanding event of the year in the Committee on Christian Citi- 
zenship is the assignment by vote of our Trustees of the subject of Race 
Relations to our field and the addition of two new^ specialists to our number: 
Mrs. D. B. Brummitt for Race Relations, and Mrs. Joy Elmer Morgan for 
the division of Motion Pictures and Radio. With Miss Mary Ross Potter 
continuing as specialist in Alcohol Education and Mrs. W. D. Schermerhorn 
as committee secretary in charge of definite parts of field correspondence, 
the organization of our committee has been greatly strengthened. 

Marked progress can also be claimed in the personnel of our conference 
secretaries. Some conferences have found young college-trained women 
to undertake our work; others have pressed into service experienced execu- 
tives from other departments; still others are dividing the work and the 
responsibility by adding a co-chairman or a committee to act with the regu- 
larly elected secretary. In consequence the conference reports show a notable 
improvement over those of any other year, many of them commenting upon 
the increased interest shown by the auxiliaries in our work and growing 
willingness to participate. Some also enumei-ate activities outside the 
usual routine lines, such as broadcasting, writing for local papers, and 
sponsoring study classes. 

This improvement has taken place in spite of the fact that rather fewer 
communications than usual have been sent out from the office of the 
national committee. This was partly intentional, with the idea of accus- 
toming our secretaries to use means of self-education from suggested 
materials rather than slavishly to depend upon instructions; partly acci- 
dental, due to the divergence of opinion among leaders in the peace cause 
and the preoccupation of Congress with matters outside our field. One 
mailing, however, of 7,000 letters concerning the Neely-Pettengill Bill was 
passed down through the regular channels and seems to have elicited a very 
general response. 

STATISTICAL REPORT 

1937-38 1936-37 

Conferences reporting citizenship secretaries 77 79 

Conference secretaries reporting to the national secretary 62 68 

Full reports were sent by 54 51 

Partial reports 7 6 

Replies only 10 11 

On time 46 43 

Secretaries elected in Alabama, Central Alabama. Central West, Louisiana. South 
Carolina, and Southwest conferences did not communicate with the national secretary 
during the year. 

Number of district secretaries 231 219 

Reporting 207 183 

Number of auxiliary secretaries 3,051 2,304 

Reporting 2,419 1,727 

Total number of citizenship secretaries 3,344 2,605 

Reporting 2,689 1,978 

Conferences having reports from all districts 27 23 

Auxiliaries reporting one citizenship meeting a year 2,062 1,587 

Auxiliaries reporting citizenship work in some form 2,731 2,263 

Conferences having largest number of citizenship secretaries in proportion to the 
number of auxiliaries (per cents) : Northwest Iowa, 100 ; Upper Iowa, 97 ; Southwest 
Kansas, 95 ; Northwest Indiana, 87 ; Ohio. 83. 

Conferences having largest number of reports in proportion to number of auxiliaries 
(per cents) : Oregon, 90 ; Northwest Iowa. 89 ; New Mexico, 75 ; Pacific Northwest, 73 ; 
Detroit, 72. 

Conferences making largest gain in number of secretaries : Philadelphia, 49 ; Ohio, 
30; West Virginia, 24; North Dakota, 18; Missouri, 18; Upper Iowa, 18; Nebraska, 13; 
Michigan, 12. 

Number of auxiliaries giving attention to: Peace, 1,056 Alcohol Education, 1,185; 
Industrial and Social Righteousness, 726; Motion Pictures. 1,111; Participation in 
Elections, 927. 

133 



134 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 





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No. Different Persons Aided 


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No. Different Families 






















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t^Cia>'*COt-^t-t^CqOOCOOO<MCOCliOOU5iO-^CO'-iOOOOOi 


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Total No. Persons Taught 


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in Religious Work 




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Total No. Meetings Con- 


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Total No. CaUs Made 


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Year of Establishment 


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138 The Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

Deaconess Work, Personnel, Emergency, and Relief 

Grace G. Steiner, Secretary 

420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

TtTlTH the thought of one Methodist Church and one form of administra- 
tion for deaconesses in the near future, many questions arise as to plans 
to preserve the interests of the work and workers. The committee of twenty- 
seven, appointed by General Conference, to consider Woman's Work, held 
several meetings which were attended by your secretary, whose membership 
on the committee came through the Board of Hospitals, Homes, and Dea- 
coness Work. A special committee of three representatives of the three 
Methodist Churches, appointed to harmonize the discipline of the three 
churches, sought information and ideas from all forms of deaconess admin- 
istration for a meeting held in Cincinnati. From deaconesses of our admin- 
istration came an expression for the continuance of the deaconess office, the 
maintaining of the garb, and the allowance and the highest standards for 
admission in education, health, and personality. Many deaconesses voiced 
the desire to have the present plan of relationship through conference 
Deaconess Boards continued. 

The spirit of harmony prevails among deaconesses of all administrations. 
Deaconesses of our group have resided in Deaconess Homes of another ad- 
ministration. Deaconesses of The Methodist Deaconess Association have 
served in our institutions. Contentment in service seems to prevail. Again 
and again we have heard a deaconess say this year, "There is no other place 
I would rather be, for I am so happy in my work where I am now serving." 
Some have been unwilling to leave one field for another which promised 
to be a promotion. 

During the year thirty-three of our institutions have been visited and 
conferences held with workers living outside of institutions as well as the 
ones therein. 

While some institutions are visited every year or two, it is only once 
in a lifetime that we have had the privilege of visiting our deaconesses 
at Jesse Lee Home, Seward, Alaska. We can better understand and ap- 
preciate the sacrifices made by these workers who go so far from home and 
friends to serve the childi-en. It was our pleasure to give the lectures at 
Gammon Theological Seminary, Atlanta, Georgia, being entertained in 
Thayer Hall during our stay. The week preceding Easter spent at Bennett 
College, Greensboro, North Carolina, where we followed out the schedule 
planned for daily meetings, is another happy memory. 

We have had five deaconesses marry this year and six have withdrawn 
for other reasons. Four deaconesses have been retired with pension and 
three have passed to the life beyond: Miss Ida A. Jordan, Miss Elizabeth 
Larish, and Miss Mary A. Cra-\vford. From the class of 1938 of The National 
Training School, seven entered deaconess work, and one missionary graduate 
of 1937 applied for admission this year as a deaconess. 

The Deaconess Emergency and Relief Fund gave assistance to twenty- 
seven workers which amounted to $5,481. 

The combined financial report of the deaconess institutions gives totals 
as follows: 

Total balance in treasuries, July 31, 1937. . . $85,756.81 
Total receipts of deaconess institutions.... 166,866.28 



Total receipts and balances $252,623.09 

Total disbursements 166,565.03 



Balance in treasuries, July 31, 1938 $86,058.06 

Value of property and furnishings $813,595.97 

Endowment 299,997.77 

Total indebtedness on property 33,425.00 



Standing Committees 139 

Education and Personnel 

Muriel Day, Secretary 

420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Personnel. The number of calls coming to us to fill in the spring and 
summer of 1938 was 86, a slight increase over 1937. Of these, 78 were 
in national and 8 in conference institutions. In addition, several positions 
were filled in work outside the Society, where requests, as from a W.C.T.U. 
Home, came to our attention. At this writing, 20 positions have been filled 
by transfers or those returning to the work, 5 by deaconesses (through the 
deaconess department), and 61 by new missionaries. In June, 1938, there 
were 16 graduates of the National Training School. 

In October, 1937, 3 missionaries were enrolled and received the mis- 
sionary pin, bringing the total of enrolled missionaries to 132. The total 
number of missionary workers in national and conference institutions in 
1937-38 was 593. 

We must face the fact that we are not receiving as many applicants 
through church channels as formerly. This, coupled with the fact that 
home missionary work is much more specialized than in the early days and 
that standards are high as schools are advancing in age level, means that 
we have had to seek for workei's more directly at the educational soui-ces 
of supply. We have received some assistance from teachers' agencies and 
more from appointment bureaus in the college. In the spring of 1938, 64 
letters were sent to the latter and to directors of Wesley Foundations. 

Two plans to help maintain the esprit de corps of our missionary group 
have been continued. First, to help us in united thinking we have issued 
two bulletins, in December, 1937, and April, 1938. The latter contained a 
message, much appreciated, from Mrs. George Ruckdeschel, a member of 
the national Spiritual Life Committee. 

The other plan was the fifth Religious Education Conference for mis- 
sionaries and deaconesses on October 4, 5, 1937, preceding the Annual Meet- 
ing in Seattle, Washington. Miss Ethel Smither, associate editor of Church 
School Publications, led the discussion most helpfully and addressed the 
Fellowship Dinner on "Teaching Children." 

Education. The effort is constantly made to maintain the highest edu- 
cational and religious standards in our institutions. In the educational 
emphasis, the libraries have been aided greatly by the library fund which 
has come through the supply department and totaled $421.92. Especial 
attention was given to the purchasing of dictionaries and encyclopedias. In 
addition we were chai'ged with the responsibility of purchasing books for 
nine schools from their budgets. The total thus expended from both sources 
was $1,235.64. 

The self-study I'eport on academic work, prepared under the chairman- 
ship of Miss Carmen Lowry, was used as the basis of staff discussions. The 
one on extra-curricular activities is being compiled by a committee whose 
chairman is Mr. Wilmer Tolle, of Pfeiffer Junior College. This is the last 
of the series, which has included in addition "home training," "health edu- 
cation," and "religious growth." 

Desiring to place an emphasis in our grade schools upon progressive 
educational methods, we sent a letter to each of our fifteen grade teachers, 
asking that they scrutinize their educational procedure in the light of an 
"activities program." As a result, we know of several changes that have 
been made in equipment and methods, and an alertness is evidenced to have 
the best material and approach possible. 

Two schools, Mather Academy and Gilbert Academy, are accredited by 
the Southern Association, and all of our schools conform in academic pro- 
gram to the States whei'e they are located. 

The chairman of the Spiritual Life Committee, Mrs. W. E. Longstreth, 
has sent letters to the schools at Eastertime, and to the graduates individ- 
ually at commencement. We have sent from this office material for the 
Day of Prayer and for the observance of Lent to all national institutions. 
Samples of the up-to-date religious education material were also sent to 
workers in each home and school. 



140 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Miss Grace G. Steiner presented the work of the Society in the series 
of lectures at Bennett College during Passion Week, and at Gammon Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

Mr. Richard Seaman, recreational field worker under the Southern Moun- 
tain Workers' Conference, gave several weeks to recreational leadership at 
Wood and Pfeiffer Junior Colleges and at Erie School. 

While our aim is to maintain the highest standards, yet we also need 
constantly to scrutinize our programs, to evaluate them in the light of 
changing needs, and where necessary to make adaptations. 

Thus at Friendship Home and Mothers' Memorial Center, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, the Board of Trustees recommended that the two institutions should 
be placed under one executive, and larger service rendered in the community. 
I was asked to serve on a committee to help formulate plans for reorganiza- 
tion, and several meetings were held with the new staff in outlining the new 
program. The average attendance of their Vacation Church School was 176, 
and excellent plans were executed by the staff. 

An evidence of the confidence placed in Bennett College by the General 
Education Board is the gift from that board of $15,860 for the establishment 
and maintenance of a Nursery School-Parent Education Center. Three units 
are planned: a Nursery School, a Parent Institute, and a Consumer Center — 
the entire project being an extension of the work of the Department of 
Home Economics. 

The Co-operative Study of Secondary School Standards challenges us 
to study our schools, which we should like to see evaluated in the light of 
the criteria it gives. Their study on the "Measurement of the Adequacy 
of a Secondary School Library" was sent to our high schools. 

Conferences and Committees. In November, 1937, I was invited to at- 
tend the National Interracial Conference held in Evanston, Illinois, and to 
present a brief paper on "The Woman's Home Missionary Society and Inter- 
racial Work." 

I have recently been asked to serve on the Interracial Committee of the 
Woman's Department of the Ohio Federation of Churches, which promises 
to be a valuable experience, as the Committee is composed of several races 
and nationalities. 

The leadership as dean of the Gulfside School of Missions, Waveland, 
Mississippi, is a cherished opportunity for interracial understanding. In 
August, 1937, our ninth year, we invited Mrs. George W. Keen, our pub- 
lisher, to be the national guest, who brought practical and valuable help along 
financial and literature lines. Our attendance was the largest in the school's 
history — 114 — and the literature sales totaled the most. 

Serving as a member of the Educational Commission of the Southern 
Mountain Workers' Conference, I attended the meeting in Berea, Kentucky, 
in November, 1937. At this same time and place there was held one of the 
three Regional Conferences planned by the Commission. As I was unable 
to be present at the meeting of the Interdenominational Regional Committee 
of the Southern Mountains, Mrs. H. C. Black served as my proxy. 

Other committee memberships claiming time and attendance upon meet- 
ing were that of the Curriculum Committee of the Board of Education and 
of the Committee on Co-operation with the Board of Education. 

Membership on a subcommittee of the latter took me to New Orleans in 
February to study the situation at Gilbert Academy, in the event that the 
property might be sold by the Board of Education. 

A major opportunity was presented in the meeting of the International 
Committee of Religious Education held in Columbus, Ohio, June, 1938. With 
Mrs. Foss Zartman and Mrs. Merle N. English, I I'epresented the Society, 
and also the Council of Women for Home Missions, in charge of their ex- 
hibit. In connection with the Convention, the Commission of the United 
Christian Adult Movement also claimed some of my time and thought. 

Several opportunities in student work came during the year. On De- 
cember 28-31, 1937, there was held the National Methodist Student Confer- 
ence in St. Louis, Missouri, an inspiring group of 1,200 students from the 
three branches of Methodism. 



Standing Committees 141 

In May, 1937, a meeting of those in charge of student work of the Boards 
of the Church was called by Dr. H. D. Bollinger, Director of Wesley Foun- 
dations, at the request of the Secretarial Council. Mrs. Myron Collins and 
I represented the Society. 

Institutional Visits. The following pieces of work were visited during 
the year: Catherine Blaine Home, Helen Kelly Manley Center, Chinese 
Home, Ellen Stark Ford Home, Angel Island, Frances DePauw School, Rob- 
incroft Rest Home, Houchen Settlement, Harwood School, Methodist Sana- 
torium, National Training School, Gilbert Academy, Wood Junior College, 
Bennett College, Allen School, Pfeiffer Junior College, Browning Home, 
Cunningham Children's Home, and Langleyville Settlement. 

As a member of the Training School Committee I visited Scarritt Col- 
lege for Christian Workers, Nashville, Tennessee, in company with Mrs. 
F. C. Reynolds. 

An unusual opportunity came in September, 1937, to visit our work at 
Seward, Alaska, the Jesse Lee Home, in company with Miss Steiner. We 
were twenty days en route and at the Home. We commend the work of 
those who are happily serving there, faithful to their daily tasks and al- 
ways with a vision of what their boys and girls may become. The hospitality 
shown to us by our missionaries in the Home and Hospital also was an 
expression of fellowship for which we are grateful. 



Student Work 

Mrs. Myron S. Collins, Secretary 
1910 St. Marys Avenue, Parkersburg, West Virginia 

" J^VERY one of us is to be a Missionary Christian, enthusiastic and con- 
tagious, whether or not he happens to be a Christian Missionary." 

Thus have the young people themselves, through the "United Christian 
Youth Movement" well expressed the goal of this department for our Meth- 
odist students. To achieve this end, they urge Christian youth: (1) "To get 
the facts and form right attitudes; (2) To share information and enthusiasm 
with others; and (3) To bring about change and improvement." As our 
motto says, "To Know, to Share, to Serve!" 

The work of this department is concerned principally with assisting Meth- 
odist student groups to "get the facts." If this educational part of our pur- 
pose is effectively accomplished, it is believed that the desire to share and 
to serve will naturally follow. A program packet is prepared each year 
with a variety of materials and suggestions, from which one or more home 
mission programs may be arranged. For the year 1937-38, the packet was 
entitled "Rural America Challenges Christian Youth." 

More than 100 Methodist student groups thi'oughout the country are now 
reached in the following ways: (1) Through the twenty-six Kappa Phi Chap- 
ters (National Methodist Girls' Club) in universities and colleges; (2) 
Through the directoi-s of many Wesley Foundations in state colleges and 
universities where no Kappa Phi Chapter is located; (3) Through the auxil- 
iary woman serving as local student seci-etary, or the Y.W.C.A. adviser or 
president in Methodist colleges. (Six more Methodist colleges wei*e added 
during the year.) (4) Through the presidents of the institutions of higher 
education of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

At the request of the student secretary, and through the generous co- 
operation of Dr. Ernest S. Cherrington, Executive Secretary of the Board 
of Temperance of the Methodist Episcopal Church, two valuable new booklets 
wei'e distributed to all contact persons assisting the secretary of Student 
Work. The booklets are entitled "Alcohol Trends in College Life" and "The 
College and Drink Today." 

The secretary of Student Work was unable to attend the National Meet- 
ing at Seattle, and her report was given by Mrs. Gerald Whitney, of Jamie- 
son, Oregon, Grand President of the Kappa Phi Club. 



142 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Finance Methods 

Mrs. J. H. Freeman, Chairman 

84 West Winter Street, Delaware, Ohio 

Lenten Offering 
Mrs. O. D. Jacoby 

5582 Lawton Avenue, Oakland, California 

"WOCIAL SECURITY." How many times have you read those words in 
the past year? Living is a perplexing problem to all of us, but espe- 
cially so to those without steady employment, and the future grows darker 
as age creeps on. As Christians we look to our Father in Heaven and repeat 
his promises — "Lo, I am with you alway"; "As thy days so shall thy 
strength be"; "My God will supply all thy needs." With hope and faith and 
trust we go courageously on, giving a little hei-e and helping a bit there. 
Jesus went about doing good, and he asks us to do the same. As missionary 
women we are sending others to do part of this work for us. Our social 
workers are carrying new life and cheer to many homes, training boys and 
girls for Christian living with strong bodies and clean minds. As they grow 
weary in this work of ours, have they not a right to ask, "What of our fu- 
ture?" 

Have you ever thought that the Lenten Department means "social se- 
curity" for our retired missionai'ies ? As employers are asked to lay aside 
a certain percentage for the retirement fund, so we are asking you to lay 
aside your "penny a day and a prayer" during Lent for these, our workers. 
Only twelve conferences failed to send reports to me; but last year every 
conference had a share in this sacrificial giving, and I am sure these twelve 
have sent their gift to Mrs. Freeman. 

I am truly grateful to the conference, district, and auxiliary seci'etaries 
who during 1937-38 have helped to bring in $22,478.09 as our Lenten Offering 
for our retired missionaries. 



Mite Boxes 

Mrs. J. Arthur Jones 

376 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming, Pennsylvania 

Jt has been a good year; greater interest has been manifested; a steady 
growth recognized. A genei'al letter was sent to evei-y conference, dis- 
trict, and auxiliary secretary, and to some a second letter. Two general 
letters, the new leaflet, "The Mite Box Secretary," and the "Finance Leaflet" 
were sent to every conference secretary. Grasshoppers ate some of the 
boxes; floods and dust storms washed and blew some away, but we still 
maintain our high standard and expect to go on to greater victory. Our new 
slogan for the year 1938-39 is— "Let the Mite Box Talk." 

Conferences reporting 78 

Auxiliaries, Young Women, Wesleyan Service Guilds $99,605.42 

Queen Esthers 5,012 . 48 

Juniors 5,344 . 64 

Total $109,962.54 

1936-37 107,625.45 

Increase $2,337 . 09 



Standing Committees 



143 



Fifty-three conferences reported increases — Ohio Conference leading 
with $1,373.53; Southern California, $1,171.97; Rock River, $1,025.97. Lead- 
ing conference was Ohio, $9,276.34; second, Philadelphia, $7,792.17. The 
auxiliary having largest mite box contribution was Carbondale (Wyoming 
Conference, $526.09. Number of mite boxes containing $3.65 or more — 
2,220, with Ohio leading, 417. Largest individual mite box — Detroit Con- 
ference (no name given), $125; second. North Indiana Conference, Mrs. 
A. B. Cline, Bluffton, Indiana, $102.68. Fifteen conferences raised their class 
and received banners — Central Pennsylvania, lowa-Des Moines, Kentucky, 
Lexington, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rock River, 
Southern California, Upper Iowa, Wisconsin, North Dakota, North Indiana, 
Ohio. Conferences increasing their class for the second consecutive year 
were Kentucky, Southern California, North Indiana. 

The mite box statistical report for auxiliaries, young women, Wesleyan 
Service Guilds, Queen Esthers, and Juniors is as follows: 



Alabama $63 . 56 

Atlanta 17.01 

Baltimore 2,817.20 

Blue Ridge- Atlantic 66 . 08 

California 942.80 

Central Alabama 7.55 

Central New York 2,363.13 

Central West 41.52 

Colorado 944.62 

Dakota (Junior) 8.17 

Delaware 101.70 

Detroit 3,279.49 

East Tennessee 19.65 

Erie 3,291 . 40 

Florida 14.13 

Genesee 1,269 . 86 

Georgia 18.03 

Holston 793 . 11 

Idaho 249.15 

Illinois 2,106.34 

Indiana 1,545.91 

lowa-Des Moines 2,060.39 

Kansas 1,598.65 

Kentucky 561 . 46 

Lexington 283 . 75 

Louisiana 8.12 

Maine 336.26 

Michigan 1,011.37 

Minnesota 659 . 96 

Mississippi 5 . 85 

Missouri 2,251.08 

Montana State 356.36 

Nebraska 2,426 . 46 

Newark 2,453.90 

New England 958 . 00 

New England Southern 842.39 

New Hampshire 240.41 

New Jersey 2,901.90 

New Mexico 99.27 

New York 2,332.22 

New York East 2.046 . 89 

North Carolina 113.50 

North Dakota 257.50 



North Indiana 5,079.16 

North-East Ohio 4,817.91 

Northern Minnesota 932.35 

Northern New York 1,146 . 08 

Northwest Indiana 1.728.32 

Northwest Iowa 880.73 

Northwest Kansas 787 . 59 

Ohio 9,276.71 

Oklahoma 613.77 

Oregon 780 . 71 

Pacific Northwest 1,523.56 

Philadelphia 7,792.17 

Pittsburgh 2.580.46 

Rock River 5,112.66 

St. Johns River 270.82 

Savannah 11.30 

South Carolina 133.93 

South Florida (Junior) 5.00 

Southern 225.46 

Southern California 5,223 . 09 

Southern Illinois 874.57 

Southwest 25 . 43 

Southwest Kansas 1,860.45 

Tennessee 12.75 

Texas 65 . 37 

Troy 1,291.86 

Upper Iowa 1.052.92 

Upper Mississippi (Junior) 4.00 

Utah Mission 37.55 

Vermont 153.24 

Washington 83.26 

West Texas (Junior) 2.00 

West Virginia 1,722.40 

West Wisconsin 841.91 

Wilmington 1,217.42 

Wisconsin 579.29 

Wyoming 4,974.12 

Wyoming State 63 . 69 

Total $109,962.54 

1936-37 107,625.45 

Increase $2,337 . 09 



Perinanenl Missionary Fund 

Mrs. John C. Rowe 

380 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 



T AM indeed happy to report a successful year in this department. I am 
greatly encouraged by reports from conference secretaries, the major 
part of whom are organized throughout with district secretaries working 
hard. As I looked over the reports I rejoiced when I read of secretaries 
writing more than one hundred letters each, many others fifty and sixty, and 
still others twenty-five and thirty, and so on down. Thousands of leaflets have 



144 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

been distributed which will act as seeds sown and bring forth fruit. In 
many cases secretaries sending in fine reports added these words, "Next 
year I hope to do much better." With such good groundwork they cannot 
help but do better and that will mean a more secure fund for our retired 
workers. One secretary said that two persons in her conference have prom- 
ised definitely to remember the fund in their wills. It is so worth while, 
and even though sometimes we are prone to be discouraged as we go along, 
perseverance in the long run will bring about success. Long years ago I 
adopted this motto for my life, and I think it has applied doubly to this 
fund. It is this: Perseverance plus energy equals success. 

Leaflets are available which will give anyone valuable information on 
this fund, and I, as well as the district and conference secretaries, stand 
ready and willing to answer any questions that you may ask. It is my 
earnest hope and prayer that this fund may grow increasingly this com- 
ing year. 



Thank Offering 
Mrs. H. G. Leonard 

222 Otis Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 

' 'T'HE hand of my God was good upon me" is the often repeated testimony 
of Nehemiah. Such, too, has been the experience of thousands of faith- 
ful women in our auxiliaries and churches. They cannot measure their grati- 
tude, and they know that neither voice nor deed can adequately express 
it, yet in acknowledgment of countless blessings received at His hand these 
loyal women brought into the treasury of The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society last year as their Thank Offerings to the Lord the sum of $121,258.99. 

This is a considerably larger offering than was reported last year, and 
the increase is noteworthy because in twenty-six conferences there were 
smaller offerings. In some sections this was due doubtless to economic 
conditions. In an unusual number of cases there was serious illness of the 
conference or district secretary or in her family. 

Fortunately, a slightly larger number of conferences — twenty-nine — 
reported gains. These, with good reports from ten conferences from which 
nothing was heard last year, more than met the decrease. Some of these 
ten conferences had kept silence two years or longer so their reports were 
received with great joy. 

Oregon Conference for the first time rejoiced that every auxiliary re- 
ported a Thank Offering, and the secretary declared their purpose to main- 
tain that hard-won distinction. Michigan achieved that record last year 
and was justly proud. This year, unfortunately, in spite of faithful effort 
one small auxiliary marred the otherwise perfect record, a real disappoint- 
ment to the efficient secretary, Mrs. A. I. Gilbert. Nevertheless, the amount 
of the offering was substantially increased, a cause for rejoicing. 

Pacific Northwest Conference failed by only three auxiliaries to reach 
the goal. Several of the larger conferences reported a majority of their 
districts 100 per cent. It is no longer news when Newark Conference re- 
ports every auxiliary making a Thank Offering. We have learned to expect 
nothing else. 

The amounts given by the conferences range from $10 from one of the 
very small conferences to Southern California, $16,379.85. Ohio, another 
strong conference, is a close second, $13,340.26. 

We wish to express our appreciation of the initiative and the loyal work 
of conference and district secretaries. It is they who have made possible 
this encouraging report. 

Our goal for next year remains the same — A voluntary Thank Offering 
from every member of every auxiliary in every conference and complete 
and prompt reports from every secretary! 



Standing Committees 145 

Spiritual Life 
Mrs. Wilbur Longstreth, Chairman 

403 South Main Street, Carrollton, Missouri 

'T'HE annual report of the Committee on Spiritual Life for the year 1937-38 

is again a summary of strivings to fulfill the high calling which every 
earnest leader of spiritual life must feel, whether she be auxiliary, district, 
or conference leader. During the four years in which the present Chairman 
of the national Committee has held her office, she has noticed an interesting 
proportion between problems and discouragements and the successful 
achievements and encouragements which are reported to her annually. 
Although such matters as these cannot be calculated with mathematical 
accuracy, it is safe to say that a stronger note of earnestness and courage 
is now to be noted in the annual reports of the conference leaders than was 
evident three or four years ago. A very real hunger and thirst on the part 
of leaders to extend their work, making it the real foundation for our home 
missionary work, is evident. This is distinctly heartening in the face of 
some baffling problems which persist year after year. 

A resume of this year's activities would be very unsatisfactory had it 
not been for the splendid service rendered by Miss Mary F. Smith, assisted 
by Miss Louise Sumwalt, members of the faculty of The National Training 
School at Kansas City, Missouri, who actively carried on the responsibilities 
of the national Chairman from the middle of January until the 1st of July. 
Although it was very difficult to step in and assume these duties, these two 
women rendered highly efficient service and brought a fresh stream of 
inspiration to the work of the department genei*ally. The high quality of 
their labors has been referred to again and again in letters and reports 
sent to the Chairman since July. Under their guidance the volumnious 
correspondence with leaders all over the country was maintained, the annual 
report blanks for conference leaders were prepared and sent out, the "Letter 
to Leaders for 1938-39" was written, the spiritual life message in the yearly 
auxiliary Guide Book was prepared, and the names of about 6,000 auxiliary 
Leaders of Spiritual Life were secured and listed in order that the report 
of the Women's Sectional Group at the United Methodist Council held in 
Chicago, February, 1938, might be mailed to them. 

As usual, the activities of the national Committee have included pro- 
viding the Spiritual Life page in Woman's Home Missions each month, 
and the column in the Stewardship Spokesman four times a year; co-oper- 
ation with the institutions of The Woman's Home Missionary Society 
through letters to freshman classes in our schools last fall, and lettei*s to 
the graduating groups in the spring, co-operation with the General Con- 
ference Commission on Evangelism, co-operation with the Federal Council 
of Churches of Christ in America, and other activities of our denomination 
as well as others whose work is related to oui's in purpose. 

In October, 1938, during the three days prior to the opening of the 
Annual Meeting, a retreat and seminar for members of the National Com- 
mittee on Spiritual Life and all those auxiliary, district, and conference 
Leaders of Spiritual Life who could arrange to attend, was held in Indian- 
apolis under the able leadership of Dr. Gains Glenn Atkins, of the Auburn 
Theological Seminai-y, Auburn, New York. 

The statistical report for the year 1937-38 is: Conferences reporting 
Leaders of Spiritual Life by name, 78. Conference Leaders of Spiritual 
Life sending full reports, 54. Conference Leaders of Spiritual Life send- 
ing letter reports, 9. Conferences that did not communicate during the 
yeai% and conference leaders who wrote during the year but did not report 
at end of year, 19. Total, 82. Number of districts reported, 232; number 
of these having Leaders of Spiritual Life who reported, 224. Number of 
auxiliaries reported, 4,239; number of auxiliaries having Spiritual Life 
Leaders, 3,122. Number of auxiliaries achieving Spiritual Life goal on 
auxiliary achievement poster, 1,275. 



146 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Schools of Missions 
Mrs. Dan B. Brummitt, Chairman 

1010 W. 70th Terrace, Kansas City, Missouri 

^t/^E ARE told by Harry Stock that "Missions involves the education of 
all ages and classes and races, and has as one important phase of its 
work the improving of home conditions and the bettering of the entire 
environment in which people live." 

Measured by this vei-y modern and correct measuring rod, our Schools 
of Missions grade high, for this past summer entire families, mothers and 
children, teachers and pupils, met in camp, on campus, in mountain canyon, 
by lake and sea, to study missions. Surely the dream of bettering "home 
conditions and environment" will come true. 

An interesting feature, which was more evident this summer than ever 
before, was the class for each age group in the school. Tiny tots listened 
eagerly to stories of Alaska and the Southland, intermediates made puppets 
to the accompaniment of stories of frontier days, lovely daughters of Queen 
Esther Circles gave interesting and efficient map drills on the work of The 
Woman's Home Missionary Society, while mothers and a few fathers did 
conscientious work in textbook and credit courses. 

A new emphasis in Leadership Education was found which shows that 
our groups are studying not only the Missionary Society and its work, but 
the local church as a unit. As never before, all age groups looked out on 
a world needing international friendship, not race prejudice. They studied 
frankly and freely social and economic justice as a missionary instrument 
for world peace. They discovered some unchristian attitudes in America 
which indicate a need for missionary education. 

For the first time in the history of Schools of Missions for our Society 
we can report every school reporting and the grand total is interesting. In 
forty-three centers from the Atlantic to the Pacific, from Canada to Florida, 
there have been held seventy-five classes, serving adult, youth, and juniors, 
with a total attendance of 17,006 individuals. Three schools in Ohio report 
1,279 in attendance; New York, 543 in two schools; Pennsylvania, 329 in 
three schools, and Illinois, 191 in two schools. In every one, a session had 
to be given over to speculation and discussion of Unification of Methodism, 
and the conclusion which was reached unanimously was that as a united 
missionary force, not a divided force, we would face the world tasks of to- 
morrow. 

Ministerial Supplies 

Mrs. William C. Otter, Chairman 

500 West Chelten Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

TOURING the year 1937-38 thirty-nine conferences cared for 169 minis- 
terial appeals. The appeals came from twenty-one different conferences, 
the majority from southern and south-central states. 

Ministerial supply work is supposed to be the first obligation of the 
fall season. The national chairman assures the auxiliary Supply secre- 
tary that the appeals are mailed to conference Supply secretaries imme- 
diately after the same have been approved by the office of the Board of 
Home Missions. 

The auxiliary chairman of Supplies will greatly assist if she solicits 
cash and clothing promptly and has the box packed and mailed to the 
minister just as promptly. On the other hand, if her auxiliary cannot 
care for the family, she will assist equally by returning the application at 
once to the district Supply secretary. 

The auxiliary Supply chairman should remember that all the cash sup- 
plies for this department are cared for in the usual way, through the regular 
channels of finance. She should also write the minister that a box has 
been mailed to him, asking him to reply to her as soon as it arrives. 

The plan is very simple and, if followed accurately, will carry with it 
untold joy. 



Standing Committees 147 

Institutional Supplies 
Mrs. O. V. Moon, Chairman 

732 44th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

"We are glad to report a total of $134,890.09 in Supplies, or a gain of 
$8,335.25 over last year. This is a gain of $16,160.39 over two years 
ago, showing that our women and children still enjoy sending gifts as well 
as money to those in our schools, homes, and hospitals. 

The value of new Supplies $117,552 65 

Cash for Supplies, which goes through the finance department. . 15,393 82 
Freight and postage 1,943 62 

Or stating these same figures in a different way: 

For national institutions $66,455 68 

For conference institutions 58,027 77 

For ministerial appeals 10,406 64 

With eleven new conference Supply secretaries this year, the process 
of education goes on. Fifty-eight conferences made a gain. Seventy-six 
conferences reported, three more than last year. 

The confei'ences sending out the largest amount of supplies in the order 
named were: Ohio, Southern California, Philadelphia, Wyoming, North- 
East Ohio, Illinois, Baltimore, Rock River, and Newark. Many of the 
smaller conferences made splendid gains and deserve honorable mention. 

Quantities of used clothing and many books were received. While no 
cash credit is given for these, they are especially appreciated. A cash 
gift of $40 from the Honolulu auxiliary for Susannah Wesley Home was a 
pleasant surprise. 

Our national Treasurer received $1,652.85 in Cash for Supplies in addi- 
tion to the above report. 

The total cash for supplies given by conferences, plus the value of new 
goods and expense of shipping, is as follows: 

Alabama $73.95 North Carolina 18. 9G 

Atlanta 18.39 North Dakota 283.76 

Baltimore 5,304.51 North Indiana 2.464.55 

Blue Ridge-Atlantic 68.47 North-East Ohio 7.941.63 

California 1,958.51 Northern Minnesota 1,046.26 

Central Alabama 46.00 Northern New York 530.63 

Central New York 2,185.47 Northwest Indiana 1,603.30 

Central Pennsylvania 3,172.04 Northwest Iowa 1,911.90 

Central West 51.02 Northwest Kansas 332.60 

Colorado 1,331.54 Ohio 10.426.49 

Dakota 195.15 Oklahoma 3,216.82 

Delaware 476.48 Oregon 1,244.31 

Detroit 3,474.70 Pacific Northwest 1,888.13 

East Tennessee 7.00 Philadelphia 8.794.85 

Erie 1,297.45 Pittsburgh 4,011.42 

Genesee 1,003.20 Rock River 4,788.79 

Holston 649.77 St. Johns River 709.99 

Idaho 157.69 Savannah 71.55 

Illinois 5,775.11 South Carolina 23.89 

Indiana 1,497.36 Southern 165.29 

lowa-Des Moines 3,215.28 Southern California 10,383.96 

Kansas 2,211.12 Southern Illinois 1,615.38 

Kentucky 716.72 Southwest 24.62 

Lexington 271.45 Southwest Kansas 1,593.74 

Louisiana 66.42 Texas 27.06 

Maine 97.05 Troy 1,635.50 

Michigan 1,581.25 Upper Iowa 519.02 

Minnesota 1,095.57 Utah 18.25 

Mississippi 27.90 Vermont 129.00 

Missouri 3,534.68 Washington 164.40 

Montana State 118.80 West Virginia 1,472.86 

Nebraska 997.64 West Wisconsin 404.00 

Newark 4,695.04 Wilmington 816.50 

New England 1,430.94 Wisconsin 1,358.91 

New England Southern 517.44 Wyoming 8,707.53 

New Hampshire 75.14 Wyoming State 167.79 

New Jersey 1,736.14 

New Mexico 70.35 

New York 1,864.38 

New York East 1,409 . 33 



New Mexico 70.35 Total $134,890.09 

New York 1,864.38 Gain 8,335.26 



148 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Promotional Workers 
Mrs. Cora Downs Stevens, Promotional Worker 

Canaan, Connecticut 

I^HECKING up on yourself is not always the most satisfactory occupa- 

tion. When the days are done, it always seems as though there should 
be more to show for the effoi't. But the greatest pleasure at the end of this 
year is the remembrance of the many contacts made in ten different con- 
ferences and the letters from the women, officers, and others, who are 
so interested they are following up the splendid plans they have made in 
an eager and competent manner. 

Addresses can be counted, 278, but the influence of the spoken word may 
bear fruit for many years. Lessons taught twenty-three, but the vision 
caught by someone may stir a soul to realize that she has a part in God's 
great plan, and that it will never be complete without her work. 

Leadership Training has been gaining in the minds of the women all 
along the line. Short-time classes which could do but little of showing the 
women what they could go home and put on in their own churches, have 
been in the work this year, and materialized happily. 

Methods on the district programs have been given a position not known 
before in many instances. Methods were given so that each officer should 
know what her companions were doing. 1. What could and should be done 
in certain offices. 2. The importance of each office. 3. The failure of one 
officer means pulling down the work below efficiency. 

In regard to letters, a few years ago my report read: "Average of 
letters for the month, forty." This year it reads sixty. Why all these 
letters ? Plans for new ventures, helps in putting across Leadership Train- 
ing, encouraging those who have felt they could not do their work. All 
these queries have found their way to my desk and have been answered, 
at length, and with a very real pleasure. 

These are days for us to "walk and not faint," to "go forward," to 
pray much, to work hard. Faithful is He who has promised the victory. 
If we may, we wish to serve another day in this great work. 

Mary L. Holman, Promotional Worker 

5 Cunard Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

T^HIS year it has been my privilege to visit six new conferences — Wash- 
ington, South Carolina, Florida, South Florida, Texas, West Texas. I 
revisited parts of the Savannah, North Carolina, Atlanta, Louisiana, and 
East Tennessee conferences. 

Each new conference, as well as those revisited, have made contribu- 
tions to my promotional plans. The greatest problem in most of the con- 
ferences is that of interesting the young people in the missionary program 
of the church and training our women to be more efficient in carrying out 
their programs. Definite decisions and plans for another year were made 
concerning the training of our women for the work and making the work 
of the Society more attractive for our children and young people. 

It was my privilege to be present at the annual meeting of West Texas, 
Louisiana, and North Carolina conferences. All of these meetings were 
well attended by enthusiastic women and some of our young people. Re- 
ports were quite encouraging, both in increase of membership and finance. 
The women seemed eager to know more about the work of the Society, and 
left the meetings inspired to carry on the work better in their local auxil- 
iaries. 

Last fall I visited the annual session of the East Tennessee ministerial 
Conference, where I was given the opportunity to present our work to 
ministers and laymen. The women as well as the men were asked to co- 



Promotional Work 149 

operate with our program and with the local church program in order to 
create a better feeling toward the work and its relationship to the local 
and general program of our church. 

Part of last November was spent working in the New England and 
Southern New England conferences. 

I must mention the work in which our Society is co-operating with the 
Board of Home Missions in the coal fields of West Virginia. Seven Daily 
Vacation Bible Schools were conducted among these children and young 
people. Mrs. S. A. Crenshaw, East Tennessee Conference evangelist, worker 
under the Board of Home Missions, and your promotional secretary, super- 
vised the schools. We do not claim to have revolutionized these sections, 
but we do feel that they have been benefited because of the schools. 

Helen L. Johnson, Promotional Worker 

2000 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

J^ HIS year has afforded the opportunity of working in ten conferences 

from Northern New York to Southern California. Much of the time 
was spent in conferences where there are very few contacts with outside 
workers. A new sense of appreciation of the value of frequent meetings 
of officers and members came in one conference where the conference officers 
must each travel two hundred miles to a central point for a board meet- 
ing. We appreciate the fine spii'it of the women and girls who continuously 
give of their loyalty and earnest co-operation in promoting plans for the 
creation of the missionary spirit and the growth of the work. 

Addresses, conferences with groups and individuals, letters, hours of 
planning, and progi^am building have all entered into the full days of an- 
other pleasant year. 

The more one works with the young people who are so sincere in "build- 
ing together," the greater becomes the sense of responsibility in such leadei-- 
ship. It was a sacred privilege to work with nearly nine hundred girls 
in six Summer Schools of Missions, conducting eighty-five classes. The 
decisions which were registered — "To go back home and take seriously my 
Queen Esther work"; "To interest other girls in our society"; "To give 
myself in missionary service"; "To put Christ at the center of my life"; 
"To be a Christian at home" — are an indication of the worth of these girls 
for whose missionary education we are very largely responsible. 

It is a real privilege to be associated with Methodist Youth in the 
National Council. The Woman's Home Missionary Society was represented 
at the Council last fall with nine Queen Esther delegates. The fellowship 
of co-operation which has begun in a fine spirit is growing as we anticipate 
the not distant day when Methodist young people will be working together 
in the building of a better world. "It is the distinct impression of all asso- 
ciated with it that the Council is a fellowship of great moment to those 
who would be Christian in times like these." 

"Forward! for us no beaten track. 
No city continuing, no turning back; 
The past we love not for its being past, 
But for its hope and ardor forward cast." 



150 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Publications and Publicity 

"Woman's Home Missions" and General Publications 

Ruth Esther Wheaton, Editor 

420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

JJELATED jottings from the memoranda pad on the editor's desk are 
grouped under headings which reveal the main divisions of the year's 
work. 

Annual Meeting. — These notations included the printed program for the 
Annual Meeting, the advance make-up of the November pictorial issue, and 
other reaiTangements of the office schedule to permit a long absence com- 
bining a vacation and attendance at the Annual Meeting, where the editors 
reported the proceedings for the Annual Meeting Daily. Following this, 
the Western Coast projects were visited. The editor joined the trek of 
the national officers, making a bow or brief talk at the planned receptions, 
district, and conference meetings en route. 

Committee Meetings. — Train schedules appeared on the memoranda be- 
cause the editor left town for occasional meetings. In company with Mrs. 
Geo. W. Keen, publisher, I attended the fall meeting of the Missionary 
Education Meeting held September 10-13, 1937, at Hartford, Connecticut. 

Since the mid-year meeting of the Board of Trustees was held in Kan- 
sas City, Missouri, a journey was made out there for a meeting of the 
Forwax'd Looking Committee early in January. 

A meeting of the Literature Committee, also in January, and a second 
meeting of the Forward Looking Committee in April, were both held in 
Cincinnati. 

A trip to New York City in May served two purposes: attendance at 
the spring meeting of the Missionary Education Meeting, and a day with 
Miss Annie G. Bailey, publisher for the Woman's Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety, to work on the joint program for union societies. 

Leadership Education Course. — This item was mentioned several times. 
Commissioned to collaborate with Mrs. V. F. DeVinny in the prepai'ation 
of the new Leadership Education Course For Local Workers in The Woman's 
Home Missionary Society, I spent sevei'al days in Chicago working with her 
and attending as many sessions as possible of the United Methodist Coun- 
cil, on the side. The finishing process for my share of the Course took 
many more days upon my return to Cincinnati. 

Speaking Dates. — Items under this heading were few and far between. 
However, I was persuaded in the early winter to speak at three of the 
Aldersgate Meetings for Cincinnati Area and the following: Fellowship 
Tea, in Sidney, Ohio; a Sunday morning Thank-offering service in Green- 
ville, Ohio; the Ohio Bi-anch Meeting of the Woman's Convention of the 
Methodist Protestant Church; the anniversary program of the Michigan 
Annual Conference; and the open Board Meeting of Michigan Conference, 
and a luncheon for Olney Rest Home, Ludington, Michigan. Besides this, 
I substituted for one of the Trustees as a Thank-offering speaker while in 
Kansas City, Missouri. 

General Publications. — Entries concerning the printing of leaflets were 
scattered throughout the entire year. References to the auxiliai'y and 
young people's study courses became increasingly numerous during the 
spring months. And in the late spring, the booklet on City Work in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, issued co-operatively by The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society, the Board of Education, and the Board of Home Mis- 
sions and Church Extension, was noted frequently. In all, seventy-four 
pieces of material were printed, including twenty-seven reprints of organ- 
izational material, fourteen new leaflets on institutions, six organizational 
leaflets, one play on the city theme, and six stories. 



Publications and Publicity 151 

Visual Aids. — This heading included the three picture sets on rural 
projects and the preliminary work on the lecture slide, "Skylines and City 
Streets." 

Woman's Home Missions. — Every month the same notation was written 
for several days in succession, "preparing copy," followed by "making up 
dummy," and later "reading page proof." Thus the eleven issues of 
Woman's Home Missions went to press carrying stories of the work classi- 
fied by types of service. 

Promotion. — This is the covering term used here for economy of space 
for the letters, interviews, conferences, and hours of planning, all of which 
were a necessary part of the daily routine. 

This full schedule of work could not have been carried through without 
the sharing of duties with the ever-co-operative assistant editor, Miss 
Helen E. Cox. 



Junior Publications 

Bertha M. Stephenson, Editor 

420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Vy ITH its list of over twenty-one thousand subscribers. Junior Neighbors 
enjoyed a year of advancement as an organ of missionary education 
for junior groups. Many of its stories and poems were copied in similar 
junior magazines issued by other denominations. The stories from the 
institutions were current, and the Scripture lessons, arranged by A. Louise 
Sumwalt, of the National Training School, fully met the present-day needs 
of leaders, who must exercise the greatest care in selecting materials for 
worship services. 

The inspiring monthly messages from the Department Secretary, Mrs. 
Austin L. Piynn, unified the aims of the many groups, under their leaders. 

Peace, temperance, good citizenship, and benevolence were reduced to 
junior terms and presented as attractively as possible. The religious motive 
held central place. 

Several demonstrations were issued in the magazine and in pamphlet 
form, including one on peace, the study book topic for the year. This all- 
important topic will be continued in the use of a project planned for supple- 
mentary work in connection with the Study Course lessons during the 
current year. 

With the November issue of Junior Neighbors the editor of Junior 
Publications bows herself out and goes back to private life. Feeling the 
need for rest, she resigned in .July, to become efl'ective at the time of the 
Annual Meeting in October. She has enjoyed this work more than she can 
express, and it is with keen regret that she gives up the contacts which 
have made so many of her days happy and significant. 

She is confident her successor will prove entirely adequate to the needs 
of the Junior Department in her editorial work on the magazine and the 
Study Course. It is therefore with much pleasure that she introduces Mrs. 
Herbert F. Young (Charlotte Anderson Young) as the new editor of Junior 
Publications. 

Mrs. Young has contx'ibuted to Junior Neighbors a number of delightful 
stories, not the least of which appeal's in the November issue, a story with 
a true Thanksgiving flavor. She is the mother of two precious Jewels, who 
are having the benefit of a missionary slant in their upbringing. Their 
father aids and abets this and all other missionary activities on the part 
of his wife. Mrs. Young's college is Ohio Wesleyan at Delaware. 

And now, God speed the work of the Junior Department! 



152 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Report of the Publisher 
Mrs. George W. Keen 

420 Plum Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

GENERAL PUBLICATIONS 
Year Ending July 31, 1938 

Receipts 

Balance July 31, 1937 '. $1 ,529 78 

Sales 

Headquarters $22 , 513 53 

Annual Meeting Ill 15 

Office— San Francisco 888 03 

Total 23,512 71 

Other Sources — 

National Treasurer for Salaries 3,696 00 

National Treasurer for Free Literature 3 ,000 00 

Slides 371 29 

$32,109 78 

Disbursements 

Postage and Express $3 ,467 73 

Office Expense 653 25 

Printing, Electros, Art 12 ,716 52 

Stock 6,382 39 

Mite Boxes 1 ,081 23 

Salaries 3,862 96 

Slides 139 90 

Annual Report — 

National Treasurer 850 00 

Postage 250 00 

Miscellaneous — 

Auditor 5 00 

School of Missions Literature Expense 15 00 

Sales Tax 33 27 

Annual Meeting Expense 74 35 

Binding Annual Reports 32 75 

29,564 35 

Balance ■ $2 , 545 43 

Audited and found correct, HOMER CLAY SMITH, Public Accountant, August 16, 1938. 

Distributed Through All Offices 

Leaflets and Booklets 397 ,946 

Envelopes (Thank Offering and Lenten) 202 , 100 

Program Calendars 39 ,250 

Mite Boxes 130,000 

Text Books 10,874 

Other Books 751 

Pins 1 ,067 

Aiixiliary Study Course 4 ,270 

Young People's Study Course 1 , 539 

Junior Study Course 1 , 070 

Maps, Cards, etc 89,570 

Annual Report 8,690 

Queen Esther Guide 13,100 

Auxiliary Workers' Plans (4,270 Study Course) 11 ,026 

MISSIONARY EDUCATION 

Conferences having Secretaries of Missionary Education 77 

Conferences reporting 40 



Publications and Publicity 153 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONS 

Year Ending July 31, 1938 

Receipts 

Balance July 31, 1937 $3 ,345 24 

Subscriptions 23, 537 71 

Advertising 54 i4 

Sundries — 

Annual Meeting Daily 600 49 

$27,537 58 

Disbursements 

Salaries $5,056 07 

Printing and Binding 14 ,274 38 

Postage 1 ,178 07 

Office — 

Postage and Express 636 17 

Stationery and Office Supplies 208 59 

Telephone 97 00 

Expiration Cards 933 00 

Circular Letter 94 86 

Equipment 15 40 

Envelopes (Luggage) 76 74 

Exchange 25 

Sundries — 

Mail List 657 19 

Electros 540 44 

Mailing 975 30 

Exchanges 14 25 

Auditor 5 00 

Publisher's Annual Meeting Expense 137 39 

Annual Meeting Daily 808 93 

Prizes 25 00 

Signs 6 00 

Publisher's Travel (M. E. M. meeting) 80 80 

Editor's Annual Meeting Expense 2 10 

Binding 20 00 

Activity charge, etc 1 03 

$25,843 96 

Balance Woman's Home Missions $1 ,693 62 

Balance Junior Neighbors 1 , 024 08 

Total in Commercial Account $2 ,717 70 

Balance in Savings Account (reserve for replacements and contingencies) $2,792 01 

Audited and found correct, HOMER CLAY SMITH, Public Accountant, August 16, 1938. 

Circulation for the year 1936-37, including complimentary copies 50,217 

Circulation for the year 1937-38, including complimentary copies 50,338 



JUNIOR NEIGHBORS 
Year Ending July 31, 1938 

Receipts 

Balance July 31, 1937 $510 66 

Subscriptions 3 ,340 56 

; $3,851 22 

Disbursements 

Printing and Binding $2,413 56 

Postage 115 85 

Sundries — 

Electros and Art Work 206 82 

Mailing 36 20 

Exchanges 1 00 

Cards 39 50 

Wrappers 14 21 

$2,827 14 



$1,024 08 

Audited and found correct, HOMER CLAY SMITH, Public Accountant, August 16, 1938. 

Circulation for the year 1936-37, including complimentary copies 20 ,055 

Circulation for the year 1937-38, including complimentary copies 21 ,406 



Bureaus 

Alaska and the Northwest 

Mrs. Frank B. Carter, Secretary 

1220 Boren Avenue, Seattle, Washington 

Lavinia Wallace Young Mission 

Nome, Alaska 
Pearl Woodfin, Missionary 

"W/HEN is it going to be Sunday school again?" asks little four-year-old 
▼▼Bertha, so eager to come. And on Monday she will ask, "Tomorrow'" 
±oi-, like the other children, she loves to come. Recently we have been talking 
how we can be 'Doers" and do something to make our primary department 
more beautitul. Ihe walls are so water stained on the sides where the muslin 
covering has been calcimined. The other walls are just bare boards. But the 
children love it, and they plan to make some pictures and flowers, for thev 
thought that would help make the room prettier. 

It is an inspiration to watch the people come to church. Seated at the 
organ, I can see them as they enter, and it always fills me with joy when 
they bow their heads in prayer as soon as they are seated. Sometimes they 
take a songbook and follow the words of the hymns while I play the prelude 
One evening as I left the church one of the women took my hand and said- 
Que-yah-na! Que-yah-na! Nice music!" Evidently I had played some of 
her favorites, and because she enjoyed it more than usual she wanted to give 
me an extra "Thank you." 

I am always struck with the courtesy of these people. They thank me 
lor everything— visiting them, singing for them, and helping them' in any way 
^T '^'^e afternoon I was called into the hospital waiting room, and there sat 
Mrs. Johnson, one of my Eskimo women. It was she who gave me my Eskimo 
name of Kirook-ch-luk," for she never could pronounce my English name 
iranslating it into Eskimo was quite simple, and she has never had a bit of 
trouble since. I eagerly shook hands, asking how she was after her long 
absence Her side was giving her considerable trouble and her face was all 
lined with pam, but she smiled and replied, "Jus' fine!" Laughingly I said 
she certainly didn't look like it, but I might have known she would 'answer 
me so. Most of my people do. And of course she thanked me for asking 
about her. 

We had a visitor one Sunday morning, a young white girl. After Sunday 
school as I was shaking hands with the people, they shook hands with her 
as they always do to any of our guests and said, "Que-yah-na! Que-yah-na'" 
1 knew by her face she had no idea what they were saying, so I explained 
that was the Eskimo word for "Thank you." "But what are they thanking 
me for ? she asked. I couldn't help smiling as I replied they were glad she 
came and wanted her to come again, so they thanked her. At first I also 
had been puzzled as I shook hands with everyone after the services for so 
many of the older women would thank me. I didn't know what for until finally 
1 realized they were glad for their church and for the opportunity to worship 
there. Ihey loved it because they loved Jesus. 

So I extend to The Woman's Home Missionary Society the thanks of 
my Eskimo people for the love gifts that make possible a new hope and iov 
m the hearts of a simple-living people who reply, "Que-yah-na'" 



,.^ , _ ^ From left to right: 

iili f Club House, 



r 



First Native Methodist Episcopal Church, 



Bureaus. 



155 



Maynard-Columbus Hospital 

Nome, Alaska 
Dr. Thomas Morcom, Superintendent 

'T'HE past year has brought several improvements to our Hospital. Last 
-*• fall we installed a small refrigerating plant which made it possible to carry- 
fresh meat through the winter and spring seasons and to keep fresh vegetables 
and fruit in good condition throughout the summer. This gives us a greater 
variety of food at lower cost. We have also added an excellent violet-i-ay 
lamp which we believe will increase our service to patients, particularly 
through the dark months of the winter. Much-needed repairs have been 
made to both Hospital and nurses' home, and new furnishings for the living 
room have made it very attractive. 

This summer, for the first time, we have had three nurses on call con- 
tinuously, the fourth being able to enjoy her vacation without imposing an 
added burden on the rest of the staff. 

At present we are again assisting in the sui-vey and diagnosis of tuber- 
culosis being conducted by the Alaska Territorial Department of Health. 
Today 136 X-rays were taken of the King Island Eskimos. This is the first 
time that this group has had the advantage of such an examination. Yester- 
day we cared for the Diomede Islanders with 83 X-ray pictures of the lungs. 
The staff has worked wholeheartedly in this project, realizing that it is 
necessary to know the problem before adequate treatment can be instituted. 

We have as a patient now one of our Eskimo girls who last year at Jesse 
Lee Home was kept for four months at rest in bed because of active pulmo- 
nary tuberculosis. During the flu epidemic of 1918, when she was only a 
baby, all of her blood relatives died. She came to us early one Sunday morn- 
ing about a month ago suffering from a hemorrhage of the lungs. We are 
concei'ned about her care during the long period needed for complete re- 
covery. Problems like hers are the most difficult we have to meet, for 
financial resources available do not permit of adequate care for such cases. 

We are sorry to announce that Miss Emily Morgan, who for many years 
carried the responsibility of the Hospital, is leaving us. Her present plan 
is to visit her sister in New Zealand. At this time we wish to express not 
only our personal appreciation, but also that of the entire Hospital family 
for her unfailing service and for the deep and lasting impression that she 
has made on this whole community. Her thirteen years of work with the 
Hospital have resulted in its being recognized throughout the Territoi'y. 
Many patients look back with gratitude for the care and comfort that they 
have experienced under her kindly ministrations. 

Miss Morgan is deeply loved and respected by the people of Nome because 
of her Christian ideals and principles and for her keen insight into human 
nature. She has lived so close to the people of this area that in trouble they 
turn first to her. This deep regard for her was expressed recently when 
she was made an honorary member of the Pioneer Women of Alaska, Igloo 
No. 1, an honor which has been bestowed upon only one other person. Eli- 
gibility for active membership requires that one shall have been born in the 
Territory or shall have lived here since 1910. 

Miss Moi'gan has received honors from numerous clubs and fraternal 
orders, but her outstanding activities aside from the Hospital have been in 
her church. There she has carried the responsibilities of many offices, and 
for years has shouldered the chairmanship of the finance committee. Her 
untiring efforts have made the church a real influence in the community. 



The nurses' home is the building in 
the rear of the hospital 





Jesse Lee 
Home 

Seward, Alaska 



Harold Newton, Superintendent 



JTOR twelve years Mr. and Mrs. Hatten gave of their lives in consecrated 
service to Jesse Lee Home. It was with many misgivings that we watched 
the "Alaska" steam out from port, taking them with it, and leaving us to 
carry on the work which they had been doing. 

We were immediately initiated into the life of Alaska, for the red salmon 
were running. With the use of a gill net, 864 fish were caught and either 
canned, salted, or smoked. 

On June 24, Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, Mrs. W. R. Brown, and Mrs. Anna 
Kresge arrived on the "Aleutian," and for ten days they gave us the benefit 
of their wise counsel. It was decided that on August 1 repairs should be 
begun on the boys' building — wallboard on the walls, linoleum on floors, and 
parlors in which to read and play. When this work is completed we will 
have a more conducive place for the cultural and spiritual training of boys. 

Quoting from a report left by Mr. Hatten: "The children come from a 
race that for more than 200 years have been exploited and despoiled by the 
stronger races until they are at the present, speaking in general, a mixed 
race, with diseased bodies, dulled minds, and without moral purpose or a 
saving vision. . . . Often the child comes from a poor, even vicious en- 
vironment, and after the few brief years spent with us he must return to 
one that has grown no better." 

This condition has been brought forcibly to our attention through letters 
of application, telling of bi'oken homes, homes broken by drink, immoral life, 
or death of parents, with the result that children are wandering about with- 
out food or shelter. How a mother can desert her babies, and often at a 
time when the father is away fishing, we cannot understand, but such seems 
to be the case. If we do not provide these children a home, they will probably 
succumb to disease, or grow up to live like those who have caused the con- 
dition in which they are living. As one woman wrote, "There is no answer 
to the condition in Alaska except that Christ be brought to and accepted by 
these people." That is our primary task at Jesse Lee Home. Our prayer 
is that we may win our boys and girls for Christ, and then give them the 
necessary training that will help fit them to go back to the various towns 
and set the example for clean, worth-while Christian homes, or to go on and 
be the nurses, doctors, teachers, and preachers that are so much needed, 
and through it all to help win this territory for Christ. If we can do this, 
we will feel that we are spending wisely and well the money, often sacri- 
ficially given by the women of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

We have had the privilege of meeting only a few who have left the Home. 
Three homes have been established in Seward — that of John and Rose 
Hughes, Steve and Ethel Paulson, and Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hatch — and are a 
credit to the work done at Jesse Lee Home. Simeon Oliver, who was in the 
Home when it was at Unalaska, stopped to visit us on his way to the West- 
ward, where he hopes to make a collection of the folk songs of Alaska. Not 
only does he hope to contribute to the music of the territory, but also to its 
moral uplift. Then we would not forget our own kitchen matron, Miss Gould, 
who is repaying for the care given her, by in turn helping in the care of others. 

156 



Bureaus. 157 

Seward General Hospital 

Seward, Alaska 3? ' 

Elizabeth J. Geijsbeek, Superintendent 

CEWARD GENERAL HOSPITAL is "a house by the side of the road," a 
*^ friend to all who come for care — the seaman, from the captain to the 
deck-hand; miners, fishermen, trappers; the aged pioneer, some of whom 
have blazed the trail for the multitudes who have followed in these later 
years; those who are occupied in the more usual pursuits of life — housewives, 
school children, babies. They come by plane, by train, by boat, by auto, on 
foot, from every part of the Territory. 

From a settlement on Turnagin Arm, where live the people who have 
found gold and are mining it, or those who are still seeking with the faith 
that they will yet strike a rich vein, came the village postmaster to us as a 
patient. Previously a leg had been amputated, and now it was necessary 
to remove the other. On the eve of the operation his sister arrived, not 
knowing of his trouble^ on her way to visit him. There was no note of 
discouragement, only of courage and cheer. In the days that followed he 
took great delight in planning with her how he would organize and carry 
on his work. He left us, waving good-by with happy anticipation of being 
at home in his cabin, of greeting friends and neighbors who will do every- 
thing possible to aid him as he purposes to serve his community coura- 
geously and joyfully. 



Our aim is not only to care for the sick and injured, but to aid in building 
up a stronger, healthier group of future citizens of Alaska, through our 
preventative work with children. The result of this work in Jesse Lee Home 
is shown that the majority of children needing hospital or medical care are 
those who have recently entered the Home and the number of tubercular 
children is less. 

For the past two years the Territory has provided for the examination 
of school children. This year we are happy to note further progress through 
the service of a Territorial Public Health nurse, Miss Smith, who is a former 
member of our staff. Her field extends throughout Seward and near-by ter- 
ritory. She has made a canvass of the town, arranged for a physical exam- 
ination of each school child and each child in Jesse Lee Home. She encour- 
ages the mother to come with the child so that she may become aware of any 
physical defects. Also when a mother and baby leave the Hospital, Miss 
Smith gives instructions on the bathing of the baby and its care. Dr. Ray 
G. Banister, resident surgeon, is ever willing to advise and to aid in every 
possible way to further this service. 

Our Hospital is well equipped, manned by a well-trained and experienced 
staff. Dr. Banister being a physician and surgeon of rare ability. The nurses' 
home, comfortably and tastefully furnished in keeping with our standards, 
also provides a meeting place for various community gi'oups and is available 
at all times. 



158 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 






Unalaska Mission 

Rev. J. Dean King-, Superintendent y 




m 



\ IJNALASKA mission has touched the lives of nearly 5,000 worshipers 
[ through the worship service and Sunday school in the last twelve months. 

Our Sunday school now has an enrollment of fifty-one. Eig-ht persons have 
been received into the church, and five babies have been baptizedT] That may 
sound small to those of you who come from larger churches, but our village 
and the village of Dutch Harbor (one and one-half miles away by water on 
another island) have less than 300 population. 

We have made over 700 church calls; have entertained more than a thou- 
sand in the Mission House, and every caller was served refreshments of 
coffee or tea and cakes. Besides, we have served over 1,700 meals to guests 
of the Mission/ about 400 of these being paying guests. 

There are baby clothes and little and big girls' dresses to make and to 
alter for people in the community. And the villagers have learned that 
Mrs. King is an expert. 

For the past eight weeks we have had in our Home one of our former 
Jesse Lee Home girls, Esther, and her baby. Esther came to the Jesse Lee 
Home as a very tiny baby when the Home was in Unalaska. She was a 
sickly baby, and the teachers and Dr. Newhall did not expect to raise her. 
She was never a strong girl, and spent a month or two in bed every year 
to help combat tuberculosis. 

Esther came back to Unalaska to her grandmother a little over two years 
ago and married soon after. A beautiful baby girl came to bless their lives 
six months go. Gunner, her husband, has been in Bristol Bay fishing since 
the first of June, and Esther and little Margaret have been living with us 
until the fisherman-daddy comes back. Esther is stronger than ever before 
in her life. She is one of our Sunday-school teachers and plays in the chapel 
services. Her home and her life are a big help for the cause of righteousness 
in Unalaska, and reveal to the natives the work of Christ in a native heart. 

One of the "old boys" of the Unalaska Jesse Lee Home days, Simeon 
Oliver, spent three wonderful weeks with us in his "old home." This old 
house was home to him. 

How proud the natives were to claim him, to see him, and how eager they 
were to hear him play! The church reed organ took on new life under his 
touch, and the Mission piano seemed alive when he played. Alex Yatch- 
manof, the chief's son, leaned over and said to me: "Mr. King, it is almost 
a miracle the way he plays. If you told me it is magic, I would believe you." 

All of the villagers, both native and white, were in our home at least 
once, and many of them a half-dozen times, to hear Simeon Oliver play. He 
gave three recitals and played to some group nearly every night while he 
was here. '\ One night the officers of the Coast Guard Cutters were invited 
guests. 

' One cannot estimate the amount of good Simeon Oliver has done for 
the village, the villagers, the Unalaska Mission, and the cause of our Lord 
Jesus Christ.__/ The love of God was sown years ago in Simeon's heart while 
he was in the Jesse Lee Home and he has not forgotten. 



Bureaus. 159 

Catherine Blaine Home 

318 Eleventh Avenue, Seattle, Washing-ton 
Mary Winchell, Superintendent 

f THINK that no Home for the money invested has been more appreciated 

than old Catherine Blaine. All over the Northwest and near-by Canada 
the Japanese young people knew of the Home as a place of security, where 
tiiey were always welcome. Some were oi'phans; some came from faraway 
towns, who found work in the city; others came for a few days to attend 
conventions or conferences. 

Our family this year consisted of Miss Tahakashi, young people's church 
worker; Mary Catherine, a twelve-year-old girl attending public school; a 
Japanese girl from Alaska attending the university; one working in a news- 
paper office ; one who had just returned from Japan ; two attending a business 
college; one working in an importer's office, and others staying for a time 
while looking for work. 

In September we enjoyed having Dr. Newhall's daughter stay with us 
while recuperating from a hospital experience. She was born and reared in 
old Jesse Lee at Unalaska. 

Our Japanese Methodist choir sang one evening at the national con- 
vention in Seattle. They afterwards won a silver cup in competition with 
other Japanese choirs during their Northwest Conference. 

In November our Japanese churches held their annual Young People's 
Christian Conference with many delegates and with 400 attending. Com- 
mittees met nearly every evening at Cathei'ine Blaine in preparation for it. 

We were very fortunate this year in having John Magee, Jr., as pastor 
for our Japanese Methodist Church, and his sister, Josephine, as director of 
the Epworth League. 

In December the young people from the different churches gave Miss 
Winchell a surprise party honoring her tenth year at Catherine Blaine. It 
was a beautiful occasion and much appreciated. 

The next month there was a tea for Mrs. Alexander, a missionary en 
route to Japan. Twenty-five years before she had stayed here for five weeks 
with her four small children, for they had contracted measles on the eve of 
their departure to Japan. She was pleased to be in the Home again that 
had given her shelter during that anxious time. 

In February there were a number of parties for the various church groups 
of young people. In March we had a beautiful wedding. A young Japanese 
dentist married a Catherine Blaine girl. The girls who were married at the 
Home last year live near and made frequent visits. 

During the year we had several callers who had lived at Jesse Lee Home 
at Unalaska during the time that Miss Winchell was in charge of the girls' 
building. Among them were Benny Benson and Simeon Oliver. 

Our daily Japanese callei's are those who have lived with us, or who 
constantly use the Home. Most of the boys came in to say "good-by" as they 
left for the Alaska canneries. We often receive letters from them, sometimes 
addressed to "Katy Blaine Family." Many of the girls worked in American 
homes during the summer. 

These Japanese youth are fine young people, Amei'ican born, and a vital 
part of American life. They need our understanding and friendship. 



Catherine Blaine Home 




160 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Helen Kelly Manley Community Center 

2828 Southwest Front Avenue, Portland, Oregon 
Ethel R. Decker, Superintendent 

'T'HE past year has been a very full one at Helen Kelly Manley Community 

Center. With a depleted personnel we were, nevertheless, able to "serve 
the present age" in a most acceptable manner. 

After the annual meeting in Seattle, several national officers visited our 
work, and by their appreciative interest created new courage and enthu- 
siasm for those who carry on, both staff members and friends of the Com- 
munity Center. 

Our activities are very similar year after year, but with each twelve 
months we see a steady growth of personalities among those who patronize 
our facilities. Space will not permit many stories of individuals, but we 
would like to mention one or two. For instance, it was five years ago that 
we were first able to interest one of the young mothers in our Woman's 
Home Missionary Society program. At that time she had no concern outside 
of her own home, and did not even own a Bible. Upon our suggestion she 
attended our auxiliary meeting largely out of curiosity. Gradually she 
responded to the opportunities of Manley Center and to the challenge of 
The Woman's Home Missionary Society program. After two years she 
became our Mothers' Jewels secretary, doing the work efficiently and en- 
thusiastically for three years. Last June she was made president of our 
local auxiliary and is active in church-school as well as several weekday 
activities. Her progress has given us new impetus to carry on from day 
to day. 

Then there is Maggie, our beautiful Negro girl, who still possesses her 
cradle roll membership card from our Settlement Center. With the excep- 
tion of two years, when her family lived outside of our community, she 
has consistently groviTi up with the various activities of our Center. Last 
year she was elected president of our high-school Girl Reserves. She is 
active in the Youth Council and the N.A.A.C.P. (National Advancement 
Association of Colored People). This year she is attending Bennett College 
in Greensboro, North Carolina, as an Oregon Conference Society scholarship 
girl. We have faith in Maggie Shepherd. 

Our Japanese kindergarten is holding its own in spite of Catholic com- 
petition. An outgrowth of this group during the past year was a request 
from the Japanese mothers for a cooking class. Every two weeks on Thurs- 
day evening they come to learn American cooking and dining-room etiquette. 

Four members of our Americanization class have received their final 
papers. Some were not able to read in any language, and others do not 
speak English, but all have learned their citizenship privileges and oppor- 
tunities this year. The class represented five nationalities — Italian, German, 
Swedish, Norwegian, and Irish. The W.P.A. teacher claims this as her 
favorite group. 

Enrollment in our weekday school of religious education has increased 
from 150 to 200. We are proud to report that Manley Center Cubs won the 
district and city soft-ball championship this summer. Joseph E. Carson, 
mayor of Portland, honored us in a speech to the boys at the trophy presen- 
tation. Next spring we plan to make a real celebration of our tenth anni- 
versary in this building. 




Helen Kelly Manley Community 
Center 



Bureaus. 



161 



California and Hawaii 

Mrs. A. G. Scudder, Secretary 

245 North Gower Street, Los Angeles, California 




Ellen Slark 
Ford Center 



2025 Pine Street 

San Francisco, 

California 



Rev. S. E. Nauman, 

Worker 



T?EV. S. E. NAUMAN, wife, and little son Elmo are completing- their first 
year at the Center and will continue for the new year. In the last An- 
nual Report I called your attention to the fact that the Nisei or American- 
born Japanese desire their sermons in English, while the older ones want 
preaching in Japanese. Since there is a scarcity of Nisei preachers, we are 
happy to have the services of this fine Caucasian minister. Our Society 
furnishes the place of residence at the Center, and many meetings of the 
people from the Japanese Methodist Church and community are also held 
here. Our workers are becoming increasingly interested in the Japanese 
young people and there now exists a feeling of real friendship. This is the 
most needed thing, for the service rendered becomes very worth while. It 
it not spectacular, but further reaching than we realize. Holding the 
interest of young people, through worship in English, Bible study, fellow- 
ship hour, reci-eation, matrons' group, husbands' and wives' groups, forms 
a program comparing fairly well with that in any other church. 

In both San Francisco and Los Angeles our work is in co-operation with 
the local Japanese Methodist Church and Dr. Frank Herron Smith, superin- 
tendent of the Pacific Japanese Mission. 

The Filipino Christian Fellowship continues to hold regular meetings 
in one side of the double building, which they rent from us. Some necessary 
expenditures were made during the year to make their quarters comfortable. 
This Filipino work is under the superintendent of the Latin-American Mis- 
sion. Rentals from spare space in the building have greatly helped the budget. 

Do not forget these consecrated young workers who are finding joy in 
service as they strive to increase Christian fellowship among these Amei'- 
ican-boi'n citizens who are so fine, so concerned about their future in their 
land, and who covet and deserve sympathetic understanding on our part. 




U. S. Immigration Station 

Angel Island, 
San Francisco, California 

Katharine R. Maurer, Deaconess 



T^HE past year has been one of the busiest we have had in our work. There 
are many things to make our hearts glad, evidences that we are of in- 
creasing usefulness, and that the work is increasingly appreciated; that 
everyday living preaches more loudly than any words, and that this kind 
of preaching often touched deeply the lives of those whom it reached. 

We are grateful, too, for the wonderful friendships formed through the 
work, the liberal education in world affairs and world visions, and for the 
joy of having a part in the work of God's kingdom on earth. 

Many visitors to San Francisco make Angel Island an objective. We 
have had hundreds of visitors, including local groups, during the past year. 
Frequently we hear: "Now that we have seen the work, we are thrilled with 
the scope of it. It really is an international work." 

Alien applications for admission arriving foreign, and also from insular 
possessions, registered a small increase over the previous fiscal year. (There 
were 6,418 such applications.) The increase would have been considerably 
more had transportation facilities been available. Such steamers as did 
arrive carried capacity passenger lists. 

Chinese domiciled in the United States have been, and are, extremely 
anxious to remove their immediate relatives from war-torn China to places 
of safety. Recently a vessel arrived bringing approximately 100 such rela- 
tives. 

Demands of labor organizations and financial problems faced by steam- 
ship companies have tended to curtail transportation schedules and facilities. 
But the normal flow of travel should materially increase with the opening 
of the Golden Gate International Exposition in 1939. 

A South American gentleman from Buenos Aires who was detained at 
Angel Island several years ago wrote recently: "Please send me some prop- 
aganda about the World's Fair in San Francisco, which I intend to visit in 
1939. Also send me the name and address of an honest attorney for a friend 
of mine in Brazil who owns some property in California." 

Varied indeed are the daily contacts at the Island, because with human 
beings the variety of opinion, disposition, and need is endless. To seek to 
meet the needs rather than attempt to supply the wants, to direct various 
and diversified interests, directly and indirectly; to provide those myriad 
incidentals needed more particularly by those awaiting deportation, and to 
send each one away happy, calls upon the utmost of one's reserve in tact 
and understanding. 

An afternoon in the library on book exchange day is like a seminar 
in human relationships. Many creeds and diversity of thought are repre- 
sented, individual and world problems are discussed, and colorful experiences 
related. So there develops a greater tolerance, a quicker stirring to sympa- 
thy and understanding in the misfortunes of others, and a unity of fellowship. 

Our Chinese pastors and Chinese Y.M.C.A. continue to give splendid 
co-operation. Other organizations likewise have generously responded when 
the need has arisen. 

The Woman's Home Missionary Society and the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, through the supplies, materials, and funds contributed for 
our occupational therapy, relief work, and many other needs, have done 
much to comfort and cheer these waiting people, and greatly helped ease 
the disappointment of those having to leave our shores and return to their 
native countries. It is remarkable that women 3,000 miles away care enough 
to aid people outside their state borders and beyond their national boun- 
daries. 

I am praying that this new year of service may be the most fruitful of 
any we have had. Please join with me in this prayer. 

162 



Chinese Home 

940 Washington Sti'eet, San Francisco, California 
Isabel Fleming, Superintendent 




A BUILDING contractor, asked to place a valuation and report on the 
condition of our property for the national Treasurer, said, "Well con- 
structed; in excellent condition." Budgets are carefully safeguarded, and 
only the most necessary things are done. Pi'operty upkeep is one of the 
most necessary, which becomes increasingly heavy with the passing of the 
years. 

During Miss Fleming's itinerary following the meeting in Seattle many 
people said to her they had never realized before the vast scope of our activi- 
ties and our contribution to society. Everywhere people were hungry to 
know more about our work — young people, high-school groups, older men, 
and women. 

"Two-weeks' vacation; O boy, am I happy!" the thunderous announce- 
ment in the front hall as girls came trooping into the Chinese Home before 
Christmas, sounding quite like typical American girls, quite contrary to 
the usual most quiet, orderly entrance. Pardonable, you will say? Yes, 
we think so. Happy girls. Our superintendent reported: "I had a letter 
from one of our married girls during Christmas week, in which she said: 
'How blessed are the memories of Christmas spent in the Chinese Home. 
Nowhere else does Christmas seem the same to me.' I believe all the girls, 
from primary to high-school age, fully appreciate what the coming of Christ 
means and how he changes hearts, making all things beautiful, and as one 
of the gii'ls said, 'Giving us that indescribable something.' A cheery blaze 
in the fireplace, the Christmas story, distribution of simple gifts sent by 
auxiliaries, Wesleyan Service Guilds, Queen Esthers, and Juniors in seven 
states in addition to California; Christmas dinner, most of which was pro- 
vided by American and Chinese friends." 

Miss Fleming visits public schools on special days. The children are 
pleased to have someone who belongs to them. They do not feel so alone 
in the world. Quoting Miss Fleming: "Food, clothing, shelter, medical, and 
dental care are important but just a means to an end. Are we really helping 
the young people to live richer and fuller lives ? I believe we are, and that 
lasting impressions for good are made in the lives of the children with 
whom we live day by day. As co-workers together with God, I believe 
efforts are being blessed and our work is worth while." 

And so we find happiness made possible in little lives where stark tragedy 
or want have sometimes made necessary their coming to us. Guidance to 
the better way of life is given. And this applies as well to those who have 
a parent who can pay for their physical needs, but who, through circum- 
stances over which the parent has no control, have found their way to us. 
Our Home is well known throughout Chinatown. We have many friends 
among the businessmen, in homes, and among members of Chinatown squad 
of the police department. 

Visiting nurses from the Health Department comment on the healthy 
appearance of our children. Little illness occurs. However, in accordance 
with the plan of the Board of Health to enforce more rigid health observ- 
ances in institutions throughout the city, we have employed one of our 
former home girls, now a graduate nurse, to make daily visitations, and 
inspect our children. Also, a Chinese physician in Chinatown is retained 
as our Home physician. 

Chinese language lessons still are considered desirable, and a Chinese 
young woman well recommended comes each evening for these classes. 
These Chinese workers, who complete the work of our staff, and are so 
co-operative and interested in our work, are truly good friends. 

In addition to our own eight or ten girls of pre-school age, other small 
boys and girls come daily from their homes to attend the kindergarten. 
In order to accommodate all who wish to come, it is necessary to hold two 
sessions each day. We consider this work a fine contact with pai-ents, a 
means of furthering our acquaintance and usefulness. 

163 



164 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Chinese Work 

Los Angeles, California 
Mrs. Loy Chan, Home Visitor 

jVOT long ago your bureau secretary was leaving Methodist Headquarters, 
on Marchessault Sti'eet, Los Angeles. She had walked through Olvera 
Street, known to tourists as an interesting place where all kinds of Mexican 
curios may be had, where a typical Mexican meal may be enjoyed, and 
where many Mexican people are in attendance. In the old Plaza may be 
seen crowds of people of all kinds, including Mexicans and Chinese. Speak- 
ers on various religious beliefs are surrounded by interested listeners. Rabid 
speakers are to be heard there, too, with their audiences drinking in every 
word. Just across on the other side is Chinatown, or what is left of it, for 
many of the buildings have been razed, to make space for the new union 
station long under construction and now rapidly nearing completion. This 
is the setting where our Chinese boys pass leisure time. 

In a moment a familiar face was seen. Approaching was our friend 
through the years, Mrs. Loy Chan. Smiles were exchanged and we stepped 
across the street and took our places on park seats along with many 
loafers. Mrs. Chan had been in conference about the future of the Mission, 
which is under the Board of Education. A change of location is necessary. 
Mrs. Chan, with her years of residence in Los Angeles, and a thorough 
knowledge of the conditions and needs of our Chinese, has been a valued 
member of the committee. It is thought that rooms not far distant can be 
rented temporarily, the ultimate aim being a new church with suitable 
equipment. This will be difficult to finance, since the constituency is not 
large. If any way opens in which our Society can contribute to this com- 
munity program we should be anxious and ready to do something. Mrs. 
Chan continues her home visitation and is truly a friend of all. 



Jane Couch Center 

1224 West 35th Street, Los Angeles, California 
Rev. Lester Suzuki, Worker 

Wo CORDIAL, gracious, and appreciative are our Nisei or American-born 
Japanese, of the Japanese Methodist Church, as well as the Issei, or older 
Japanese born, that our bureau secretary has had great satisfaction in 
the part she has played representing our Society in any matter pertain- 
ing to the interests of the work at the Center. Our building is attractive 
and homelike and is now in good repair. The yard is well kept, and is 
enjoyed by the many groups who meet there from time to time. 

Rev. Lester Suzuki, Nisei minister, his wife, and little two-year-old 
Aiko, welcome all who come. As in San Francisco, our Society is contrib- 
uting toward the Nisei church budget, since many Nisei are of high-school 
or college age and not yet earning incomes. They have begun in an encour- 
aging manner to contribute toward the budget and in time should be able 
to carry it. The bi'ethren at the church are most co-operative in every sense. 




Jane Couch Center 



Bureaus. 165 

Rev. Suzuki has been busy attending the week-end "Advance" of the 
Nisei young Christian people, accompanying parties on recreational week 
ends to the mountains, teaching in summer institutes, preaching in English 
at the service which is held in the church proper, and all the other duties 
required of young preachers as they endeavor to build up an increased 
membership. 

Recently at an annual Nisei Week, the general theme was "Christian Citi- 
zenship." One of our fine young Japanese-Americans has been president 
of the Wesley Foundation at Los Angeles Junior College this year, and he 
also was a delegate to the Methodist Youth Conference held in St. Louis 
during the winter. These splendid young Japanese-Americans are alert to 
the best things of life, thorough in their preparation for whatever they 
undertake. Rev. Suzuki should find his second year more productive of 
results for the Kingdom. 



Border Work 

Calexico, California, and Mexicali, Lower California 
Ruth Ferguson, Worker 

Approximately 20,000 Mexicans and 1,200 Chinese live in Mexicali, 

Baja or Lower California. Rio Nuevo or New River is the boundary 
line at this point between California and Mexico. On this side in Calexico 
the population is about 6,000, 60% of whom are Mexican. Only one Prot- 
estant minister is serving in Mexicali, where such a worker must be a 
Mexican citizen. Work was sadly needed in Calexico. At the request of 
Dr. Vernon McCombs, superintendent of the Latin-American Mission, our 
Society last October began work on the border by appointing Ruth Ferguson, 
deaconess, to the field. She is laboring with Dr. Dora Axe, appointed to the 
work through the Board of Home Missions. 

These young women went forth, not knowing what lay before them 
except that there were people who should be ministered unto and who should 
know God. They live on the upper floor of the parsonage for the Mexican 
pastor, who serves the Mexicali church, but who lives in Calexico. They are 
very zealous, and were fairly comfortable until the intense heat of an 
Imperial Valley summer brought the thermometer up peiilously near the 
one-hundred-and-twenty mark, but they bravely carried on. 

They met with a cordial reception from the Mexican people, where they 
are rapidly making friends on both sides of the Border. Those of our own 
church in Calexico have been most kind to them, and the pastor, Rev. Zim- 
merman, and his wife, have been of invaluable assistance and encouragement 
to them. These workers are carefully pioneering. Dr. Axe, with her mu- 
sical ability, has been of great help and, being a licensed physician, has 
been able to minister to many. Patients come to a small clinic which has 
been set up on the Calexico side. Miss Ferguson is now conducting serv- 
ices in the Calexico church, which was not being used; a well organized 
Sunday school, Enp^lish classes which were very much wanted, and boys' and 
girls' clubs are all well attended. Numbers of representative Mexican men 
attend the classes for English, and in return our workers are given aid in 
mastering the Spanish language. Community sings are an encouraging 
feature and are enjoyed by those who come. At Easter time Miss Ferguson 
arranged for a communion service in Calexico, the first for a number of 
years. Home visitation brings new friends and opportunity for many a 
word of cheer. 

The work will be on a much more definite basis for this winter. Truly 
this is a field ripe for the harvest, a great challenge which is being met by 
two who love their work and their people, and are accomplishing much 
with limited equipment. 



166 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Frances DePauw School 

4952 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 
Edith Lucile Jackson, Superintendent 

T OS ANGELES, with a Mexican population of 85,000, is the second largest 

Mexican city in the world, with possibly 400,000 Mexicans in Arizona 
and California. This fact, together with its close proximity to Mexico, is 
proof that Frances DePauw School for Mexican girls on Sunset Boulevard 
is in a strategic location. For forty years the School has afforded a Chris- 
tian home life, creature comforts, educational opportunities, and character 
building to Mexican girls. 

Ninety-five girls and seventeen staff members compose the household. 
The girls range in school work from the third grade through high school. 
Three received high-school diplomas in June and eleven completed the ninth 
grade. In addition to the busy program of regular school duties, Sunday 
school and church attendance, Epworth Leagues, Queen Esthers, Home 
Guards, and other activities have gone to make up a full schedule. A Spanish 
play is creditably put on by the Spanish classes. A style show, modeling in 
interesting fashion garments made in sewing classes, provides an evening's 
entertainment. The declamatory contest arranged by our English and dra- 
matics teacher shows careful training and considerable talent. W.C.T.U. 
contests are given each year. Honor Assembly is an event, with awards 
bestowed on deserving ones who have been on the honor roll throughout the 
year, for outstanding work in music, and for best reading of good books 
during the year, both in English and Spanish. There is an award for best 
typing, for our school cui-riculum includes instruction in bookkeeping, short- 
hand, and typing. Several of our girls have held positions requiring this 
training they have received with us. The senior class play brings a full 
house. The junior-senior banquet with the faculty, juniors, and seniors from 
Spanish-American Institute as guests, finds best dresses in evidence, lovely 
little corsages quietly delivered in advance, and a happy time. An operetta 
is another entertaining evening. 

Baccalaureate and commencement exercises were always held at the 
School, with the best speakers obtainable in the city. Immediately following 
the closing, pictures of various groups are taken by friends on the lawn, 
always using a lovely big palm tree for picturesque background. Then 
parents and girls, with suitcases, begin to leave, and another year's work is 
done. As we watch them go away, our hearts are filled with thankfulness 
that we have been able to do this thing for them. And our prayer is that 
the influence at DePauw during the year has been all that it should have 
been in helping these girls to orient themselves for whatever lies before. 
Some will return in the autumn, others may not come back. Fifteen have 
remained with us during the summer. Miss Jackson is taking a leave of 
absence for a year, and Miss Helen Aldrich, experienced worker in the 
schoolroom for a number of years at DePauw, will be acting superintendent. 

The grand happy finale is the alumnae banquet held at the school in 
the evening. An honor guest at this affair is always our beloved Miss Jennie 
Mathias, who was for twenty-nine years superintendent, and to whom the 
former girls would rather go for counsel than to anyone else, so sympathetic 
an understanding does she have of the problems and desires of the Mexican 
girl. This banquet furnishes opportunity for a reunion of our girls of 
other years, and some bring their husbands and children. Toasts and re- 
sponses filled with clever repartee, reminiscing, and words of appreciation 
for what DePauw has done, make our hearts glad. 



h^A* 




Bureaus. 



167 



Susannah Wesley Home 

1143 Kaili Street, Honolulu, T. H. 
Frances L. Taylor, Superintendent 

'J'HIRTY-FIVE years ago the first worker of The Woman's Home Mission- 
ary Society began ministering to needy children in Honolulu. Many home- 
less, neglected ones were there, others with parents who, because of their 
work in the fields and plantations, could not properly care for their own. 
In the beginning all these children were Japanese, but soon Korean, Rus- 
sian, Puerto Rican, and Filipino children sought admission, and this inter- 
mingling of eight to ten bloods continues to be found in the Home. 

Beginning with thirty-five women and girls, for women were admitted 
in the early years, Susannah Wesley Home today, after many changes of 
location, has a lovely family of eighty-five girls where visitors to the 
Islands are happy to call, a comfortable house sitting on a one and one-half 
acre site. The cottage next door to the main building, a gift from the 
G. N. Wilcox Trust Fund, furnishes home life for our older girls under 
careful supervision. 

Dependent girls, not delinquent, are admitted without regard to race 
or religion. Babies are not cared for, though during the year twins of 
two and a half years are calling Susannah Wesley home. The majority of 
the girls are in their teens and attend the public schools. Three received 
high-school diplomas in June. Do not overlook the fact that these girls, 
regardless of race, if Hawaiian born, are American citizens. 

Days are full. Those who are old enough have their part in the per- 
formance of the daily work of the Home. Also, the girls are eagerly sought 
for appearances on community programs and radio, and take their places 
in Girl Scouts, Girl Resei'ves, and Brownies, church choirs. Christian 
Endeavor, and other activities. 

Mumps in the Home during the year was not a particularly welcome 
guest, and added to an already overfull program. However, little incon- 
venience was felt, as cases were mild. Necessary improvements have been 
made during the year to meet the requirements of the Board of Health 
and Fire Department. 

During summer vacations those over sixteen are permitted to work in 
families or with the pineapple companies. Relays are taken to the Moku- 
leia beach house, which was a gift to us, as you will remember. Here 
sewing machines hum in the preparation of fall garments, and necessary 
time is given for recreation, where bodies receive renewed strength for 
fall and winter. 

Susannah Wesley continues her high standing in Honolulu as one of 
the best homes in the community, and each year receives liberal support 
from the local welfare agencies. The Needle Work Guild is a kind friend 
and makes annual contributions of garments and linens. This is much 
appreciated. 

Miss Frances L. Taylor, superintendent, has made an important place 
for herself in the various social service and other agencies, among our 
children, and local board members. 

Visit Susannah Wesley when you go to Honolulu. A hearty welcome 
awaits you. You have interests there. 



Susannah Wesley Home 




168 



The Woman*s Home Missionary Society. 



City Missions — Central 

Mrs. C. C. Travis, Secretary 

819 Judson Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 

Peek Home 

Polo, Illinois 
Grace Brandes, Superintendent 

QlNCE the nevir building for the Peek Home girls vi^as completed and 

occupied in 1930, seventy-eight children have been under our care, the 
boys of school age living in the old farm house and the others in the new 
building. During this year fourteen children have been taken by parents 
or guardians. Five of these were with us for eight years. Others have 
come in their place, and we now have a family of forty living at Peek. 
One of the newcomers is a Mexican girl from Maxwell Street, Chicago. 
Lilian Lavin, a Marcy girl, assistant in the Maxwell Street Y.M.C.A., made 
the arrangements, previously sending an older sister to Harwood. 

Our 154 acre farm provides nearly all the vegetables for the family. 
By the time frost came we had canned between nine and ten hundred quarts 
of vegetables, and fresh ones were used every day during the growing 
season. The year's supply of pork and beef is canned during the winter; 
also many chickens. Our cows keep us in whole milk, butter, and cottage 
cheese. About twenty-five quarts of milk are consumed daily by the fam- 
ily, and about $45 worth of cream a month is sold. The flock of chickens 
furnish many chicken dinners and plenty of eggs for daily use. 

We have started a young orchard, but at present most of our canned 
fruit comes through the supply department. We use between three and five 
quarts of canned fruit daily, fresh fruit when we can get it. 

The problem of pretty dresses, pajamas, and underwear is taken care 
of by the supply department, which sends pieces of print, muslin, and 
outing. The matrons spend much time sewing for the girls and teaching 
the older girls to sew for themselves. A few are taken care of by an 
auxiliary. 

Two of our girls gi-aduated from high school in June. This year there 
are four girls in high school. 

The Peek Home Queen Esthers, assisted by the Home Guards, were 
hosts to sixty-nine guests at the fall Rockfort District Queen Esther rally. 

The Sunday evening worship service and study classes are a pleasure 
as well as a help in character building. Evening worship is an intimate 
time between workers and childx'en. Church, school, work, and play give 
the children a well-rounded, happy life. 

Much thought is given to the older young people going out into the 
world. One girl is having her last year at The National Training School 
in Kansas City, Missouri; one is working at Mothers' Jewels Home and 
beginning her college career; two entered Snead Junior College; one is 
taking a commercial course. Peek is still home, and the workers and 
bureau secretary are looked to for advice and help. 




Peek Home 




Campbell Setllenient 

2000 and 2244 Washington Street, Gary, Indiana 
Gilbert Collins, Superintendent 

'T'HE small building has been a busy one this last year, as the following 
figures will show: 

Group activities: clubs, crafts, parties, gymnasium, playground, game 
room — 

Girls — Registered 650 Periods 558 Contacts 6,723 

Boys— " 815 " 1,140 " 32,032 

Adult — " 593 " 862 " 14,585 

Mixed— " " 658 " 27,898 

Other Contacts 19,837 

Totals 2,058 3,218 91,075 

Unnumbered human interest stories are wrapped up in these figures. A 
new plan was tried this year with Christmas gifts sent in through the Supply 
Department; 1,032 gifts were distributed at the homes, thus encouraging 
the celebration of Christmas in homes. 

This quotation from a Gary paper shows the need of our boys' work. 
After a. fourteen-year-old boy had been stabbed by a boy of his own age, 
a reporter tracked down a "black gang." He says: "Its members are from 
twelve to sixteen years old, and every applicant for initiation must prove, 
before he is considei'ed, that he has committed at least two burglaries or 
other equally serious offense. Every lad in the gang carries some weapon, 
usually a long-bladed knife, and moves up considerably in his comrades' 
estimation if he has used it. Its members are both white and Negro. Thei-e 
is a club house in an unused coal shed, whei'e young desperados can meet 
and where loot can be stored." 

This club is in our neighborhood and is competing for our boys. 

A clay modeling class has solved the problem of some of the most difficult 
children and real talent has been discovered. Thirty-eight community 
nights, with an average attendance of 378, packed the gymnasium to more 
than capacity. These were conducted as amateur hours with "try outs." 
Needless to say, they furnished interesting and diversified programs. 

After fifteen months' delay in litigation to clear the title, we took pos- 
session of the new building on March 25. The very small amount of money 
for cleaning and repair was "inflated" by the work of the staff, volunteers, 
and WPA labor. Walls, floors, and woodwork were scrubbed and rescrubbed, 
much painting done, and plumbing put in order. No major changes have 
been made. We hope to put in one partition and one set of folding doors. 

The old building is being used as a workers' residence and a nursery 
school run by WPA. The old gymnasium is used by boys. Furnishings 
moved from the old building to the new has equipped an office, the boys' 
club rooms, and game room. The big auditorium is the girls' gymnasium, 
and is used for community nights, but there are no seats. A large club I'oom 
for adult clubs is rented to several Negro lodges for their meetings, but 
that has very little furnishings. The new building is also the residence of 
two boys' workers and contains the girls' club room, although these also 
are inadequately furnished. 

The staff is entering into the work with great enthusiasm, thankful for 
room, and with faith that equipment will come. 

The building was dedicated by the first activity, a very fine Daily Vaca- 
tion Bible School, and an informal service at the fall board meeting. 



The new building 






^M 



^^ 



^^^ '5'^ Marcy Center 

1539 South Springfield Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
Anna Ileistad, Superintendent 



Girls 

Boys 
r Mixed 
^' Adults 

Dispensary- 



-Periods 1,285 

- " 1,251 

- " 2,424 

- " 706 

- " 252 



Other Contacts. 



Enrolled 467 

536 

2,358^ 

...... 575^ 

2,173 



Contacts 



Totals 5,973 



6,109 



9,600 

12,273 

141,875 

17,532 

8,088 
12,700 

202,068 



TJSTCREASINGLY, emphasis is being- placed on mixed groups, that boys and 
i girls may learn to live together. - One new feature of the summer was the 
day camp._ We are praying for the time that The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society may have a real camp near Chicago. 

Three Marcy trained boys helped this summer in the Daily Vacation 
Bible School. The mother of one of these, a high-school senior, was thrilled 
when she heard over the radio a Juvenile Court jvidge ask a boy, "Isn't there 
some place where you can go and have some part in wholesome recreation?" 
The boy answered, "There is Marcy Center." This mother said, "How I 
thank God that my boy has been going to Marcy for years."; 

We welcome to the staff Miss Annie Golley, a Jesse Lee Home girl, 
who graduated last June from The National Training School. 

The staff has been assisted this year by sixty-six workers under Govern- 
ment projects, not all at the same time. These recreational and educational 
projects are well managed, as the institution is carefully inspected and 
workers are assigned according to equipment and staff ability to give trained 
supervision. Marcy ranks among the highest in the city. Among these 
workers are some who have given most excellent service for several years 
and have developed exceptional ability. Mr. Hyman Sacklove, who for three 
years has been director of the community club, has built up a great work in 
this Bohemian community, about a mile from Marcy. 

These Government workei^s are paid salaries ranging from $55 to $94 
a month for the WPA and AEP, and for the NYA from $19 to $22. The 
total paid to those assigned to Marcy has been about $30,000. The total 
Marcy budget was $17,155.42. 

The most difficult part of the work is meeting the questions of the little 
children when they ask, "Why do people hate us?" Some tell us the stories 
of how they escaped from Europe and are in sore need of help in adjustment, 
and others come with distressing stories of friends and relatives who are 
suffering such great persecution with no way of escape. 

This world situation, however, is breaking down some of the barriers 
which have existed. As our workers take an active pai't in movements for 
Jewish relief, or movements tending to break down anti-Semitism, Jewish 
leaders working with them are gaining confidence and losing some of the 
prejudice against Christians. 

Marcy, standing today as the largest Christian Settlement in the world 
working in a Jewish community, has a tremendous opportunity and respon- 
sibility. In this time of crisis, we need to have a large vision of our task. 
God has marvelously led us, and we have seen his hand in this work. We 
know not where he may lead, but we are praying that we may be ready 
to follow. 

170 



Bureaus. 171 

Newberry Avenue Center 

1335 Newberry Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
Arlington A. Smith, Head Resident 

jyjiARCY CENTER is one of the oldest social institutions in Chicago, ante- 

. dating- Hull House by six years. It is still carrying on in two institu- 
tions, the work at the corner of Maxwell Street and Newberry Avenue going 
under the name of Newberry Avenue Center, and directed by a board from 
the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Evanston. 

The neighborhood continues to be one of the worst in Chicago, steadily 
growing worse, owing to the very bad housing. Juvenile delinquency has 
always been an important problem in the neighborhood, the offenses for the 
most part pertaining to petty thievery and sex delinquency. These cases 
are handled through a home service worker who has often found it advisable 
to work with the Juvenile Court. A great many of the young people have 
court records, but we are glad to report that conditions seem to be a little 
better. 

The neighborhood is made up of several nationalities. At times there 
have been as many as eight nationalities represented in our groups, but 
Negroes and Mexicans predominate. There was a time when this was the 
largest Mexican group in the city, but they are moving further West and 
the Negro population is increasing. There is, of course, some evidence of 
racial prejudice, but very little animosity is expressed among our groups. 

There is considerable Communism and other "isms'' in the neighborhood. 
The conditions as to law enforcement, particularly in relation to voting, are 
very bad. There is apparently very little attempt toward the enforcement 
of other city ordinances, and there is much evidence of a great many corrupt 
policies. 

Traffic in liquor, drugs, and all kinds of vices is particularly bad. We 
have worked with various organizations of the city in trying to meet this 
condition, but with the law enforcement situation being what it is, it is an 
extremely uphill job and most discouraging, especially as the people are 
so largely the "floater type," which makes it very difficult to get community 
co-operation. 

Health conditions are, of course, bad, as there is so much filth and poor 
sanitation. Much of this is contributed by the Maxwell Street market and 
by the laxness in enforcing the ordinances pertaining to the handling of 
food and the collection of garbage. The nurses of the Michael Reese Infant 
Welfare Station are working from our Center and accomplish much toward 
the promotion of health and better care of children. 

Sex delinquency is always a major problem, and we are co-operating with 
the social hygiene organization of the city. 

The contacts this year have numbered about 71,000. A new feature being 
introduced this fall is a program of co-opex'ation with the Negro churches 
of the neighborhood by putting on an afternoon church school. 



Newberry Avenue Center 





Shoemaker Hall and 
Administration Building 
Epworth School 




■afr?*^ JC^»m^-. -\LJt 



Bureaus. 173 

City Missions — Central West 

Mrs. Frank L. Davis, Secretary 

6123 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Missouri 

East St. Louis Settlement House 

1132 North Ninth Street, East St. Louis, Illinois 
Lillie R. Sheffer, Superintendent 

A NOTHER year of fourfold service to the community in a stockyard and 

packing-house district of the industrial city. East St. Louis, Illinois, has 
closed. It is impossible to give the tangible results of the labor and money 
expended, but there is great satisfaction and stimulation in the expressions 
of appreciation which are being brought to the workers fi'om the fathers and 
mothars of the community who received their childhood training at East 
St. Louis Settlement House. Recently a young father stood in the rear of 
the chapel at the close of a program. He told the superintendent that his 
wife had always wanted to tell the workers how much she appreciated what 
they had done for her, but she was afraid they would not believe her. When 
this wife was a little girl her mother died, leaving five children. The father 
worked, but he spent most of his small wages for drink. Day after day the 
workers helped these children plan their housework, supervised their mend- 
ing, and kept the baby in the Nursery. Later this family moved away and 
the workers often wondered if their efforts had been worth while. Now after 
many years have passed the husband of one of these children is pointing 
with pride to his own three immaculate children and his well-kept house, 
giving credit to the training his wife received at the Settlement. 

Children near and far attended the Daily Vacation Bible School, with an 
enrollment of 183 and an aggregate attendance of 2,454. Old Testament 
stories were used for the devotional period and the Psalms for memory work. 
Under North Star and Rainbow Bridge were used for the friendship stories. 

The eighty boys and girls who attended the kindergarten this year with 
some Nursery School children gave for the closing program an operetta 
entitled "Old Woman in the Shoe." The janitor built on the back of the 
platform a large shoe which made a fitting background. 

The doors of the Florence and Irving Wood Nursery are always open 
to small children. Eighty different children were enrolled in the Day 
Nursery or the Nursery SchooL 

The clubs and classes were well attended during the year, and each group 
showed progress as they closed the year's activities. The style show and 
exhibit given in April was a great success and showed what they had ac- 
complished. Were the girls proud of their pajamas, dresses, and house- 
coats ? You would have thought so as they walked on the platform and 
turned so that all might see their garments. The boys had a fine display 
of woodwork, toys, window boxes, and bird boxes for the garden. 

Sunday school, Epworth League, and church services show an increase. 
With the exception of Home Guards, there has been an increased attendance 
of the missionary societies. Sixty Mothers' Jewels were enrolled this year. 

The Settlement House staff is fundamentally interested in developing 
the individual. It is true some of the people are hungry for food; diet is 
unbalanced and insufficient. Co-operating through the various relief agen- 
cies the staff tries to remedy this condition, but the hunger for companion- 
ship and self-development is essentially as keen as hunger for food. Thus 
the organized activities at the Settlement with Christian leadership are an 
attempt to satisfy this yearning, and serves as a haven to hundreds of its 
members. 

We want to thank one and all who have helped to make the new building 
a reality. Plans are completed and work started early in the fall. "Noth- 
ing must be done too late; opportunities lost can never be regained." 



174 The Woman's Home Micsionary Society. 



Epworth School for Girls 

Elm and Marshall Place, Webster Groves, Missouri 
Elva Lee Perry, Director 



gPWORTH SCHOOL, located eleven miles from the heart of the city of 
St. Louis, is operated on the cottage plan, each cottage being a complete 
unit and each girl having a private room. The plant includes an adminis- 
tration building, two cottages, a schoolhouse, a craft shop, and an outdoor 
swimming pool. Thirteen acres of well-planted grounds surround these 
buildings, which add to the efficiency of a program planned to meet the 
educational, vocational, physical, recreational, and religious training of 
the girl for rehabilitation. » 

During the past year there were 231 referrals, 29 of these accepted, 36 
girls were discharged. At the close of the fiscal year, 59 girls were enrolled 
m the school, 44 living on the campus, 3 in homes of parents, 9 in wage 
homes, 1 taking nurse training, and 2 awaiting dismissal. 

The treatment plan of Epworth School begins with a complete physical 
examination, followed by a check-up examination every six months. Diets 
are analyzed by a Washington University scientist. It has been found 
through this method that Epworth School has the most adequate diet on the 
smallest budget of any institution under the United Charities of St. Louis. 
During the past year dental care has been given when needed and funds 
permitted; glasses have been provided to correct faulty vision. 

Because of retardation and emotional disturbances, some changes have 
been made in the academic program. Statistics show that a high percentage 
of delinquents are above the average in mechanical ability. The School 
aims, through remedial education, to train mechanical talent rather than 
attempt to develop intellectual powers beyond the ability of a girl. All girls 
were tested at the beginning of the school year for intelligence, aptitude, 
and achievement, and were retested throughout the year to note progress. 
During the year twenty-seven girls attended junior and senior high schools 
in Webster Groves and three were graduated. Four girls were enrolled in 
a Webster Groves grade school and nine completed the eighth grade on the 
campus. Two attended business college and one girl finished her second 
year of nurse training. Vocational training, including dressmaking, launder- 
ing, household arts, and handcraft was provided for the entire student body. 

To give the girls a new outlook on Christian living, regular Bible classes 
are held. The Queen Esther organization of thirty members and the morn- 
ing and evening prayer services where the girls participate are teaching 
them Christian leadership. Results of this training were manifested recently 
when the youngest girl, who had come to the School presenting some of the 
very hardest behavior problems, commenced to show interest in Bible 
stories. A few days ago she came to the Bible teacher and said: "Do you 
know what I have been asking Jesus for? I've been asking him for some 
clean thoughts." This seemed to be the turning point for her, and now 
she frequently offers audible prayers at the group meetings. 

It is the plan at Epworth School that each girl be adjusted and trained 
according to her special problems and aptitudes. A complete case study 
and record is kept of each girl, and where necessai-y, stress is laid on in- 
dustrial work, but not at the expense of the academic subjects. Recreational 
activities include the swimming pool (during the summer months) and the 
girls compete with other girls in diving and race swimming. During the 
winter months the gymnasium is used for basketball. Other games include 
volleyball, baseball, coasting, skating, tennis, and free play, all of which 
develop the girl physically and give her poise. 



F 1^ 


tea'.! 


^■^ ng 




fi^Jp^K^l^J^ 


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-aairt 



Mothers' Jewels Home 

Yoi-k, Nebraska 
Rev. James N. Smith, Superintendent 



^HOME for every child and that love and security which a home provides 
is the ideal which The Woman's Home Missionary Society stands 
squarely behind when it provides and maintains Mothers' Jewels Home at 
York, Nebraska. 

P'or forty-eight years this Home has had a share in caring for dependent 
children. During that time the Home has offered nurture and discipline, 
which only love can supply, to nearly 2,000 boys and girls from almost 
every state. The records show that the investment has been a wise one 
for Christian citizens. 

The importance of this Home, with its development plan, cannot be over- 
estimated. During the past three years the program has been based on the 
4-H Club plan. The projects, worked out for each child over ten years of 
age, give a definite measure of security and the opportunity of planning 
ahead during the child's growing years. While working at his project the 
child is given security and happiness for the present and sound experience 
on which to build his future. The projects also teach the child "the give- 
and-take of doing and sharing with others, and the sense of solidarity and 
'belonging,' all of which make a solid bedrock of character and good citi- 
zenship." 

Last year we told you how this plan had given the stimulus for increas- 
ing the farm operation from 160 acres to 320. The same program has con- 
tinued effective, and there is now under cultivation 610 acres. This proves 
that boys and girls do appreciate a constructive program and are ready 
and willing to learn values and share in the developing of a self-supporting 
institution. 

The members of the family, consisting of an average of eighty children, 
ten staff members, as well as other helpers, are interested alike in the prog- 
ress and development. This year the grain and sorghum crops will he 
sufficient to feed the stock. The gardens have been unusually fine, due to 
rains and the aid of a water pressure system which was installed in the 
spring, permitting irrigation. Fresh vegetables have been plentiful through- 
out the summer months, and there has been enough for the canning of many 
quarts of beets, beans, peas, corn, and tomatoes for the winter use. The 
poultry, pig, and calf projects have supplied the needs in fried chicken, 
eggs, and meats, the boys of course doing the butchering. Each child has 
had an average of one quart of milk a day. Butter has been churned and 
has partly supplied the need; ice cream was made at least once a week. 
The projects in homemaking for the girls have provided well-balanced meals, 
orderly dormitories, and attractive dresses. 

The baby fold has not only given to ten small children a home and proper 
care, but it has been a means of training older girls in child care and future 
motherhood. 

Not only has the Home cared for its regular family, but it has placed 
forty children in other homes, for adoption or returned to relatives. The 
calls for adoption are more than we can meet. 

The genei-al health speaks for itself when we state that only seven 
children are under weight, and outside of minor ailments there has been no 
sickness. 

Harry Silvy, the honor 4-H Club boy of last year, was able to work his 
way through the School of Agriculture at Nebraska University the last 
semester. Verv creditable musical recitals have been given by the children. 
The social and religious life shows marked improvement. Each child is 
fitting in to the community and church activities and carries his own re- 
sponsibility both at school and church, which is a great satisfaction. 



Above: Administration Building 
and Mills Cottage 





City Missions — East Central 

* 1 Mrs. H. S. Metcalfe, Secretary 

6632 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



McCrum Comniunity House and Oliver No. 1 Community Chapel 

26 Nutt Avenue, Uniontown, Pennsylvania 
Bessie K. Van Scyoc, Superintendent 

^87e pick a few incidents from our year-long activities at McCrum to 
give you the flavor of our vi^ork, vi'ork which keeps us busy and happy 
in the thought that we ai*e sharers in the joyous task of building the King- 
dom in human hearts and homes. 

Our work has increased in efficiency and extent because McCrum is also 
the proud possessor of a Ford car. Following a rough, sandy road back into 
the hills, we come suddenly upon a plain, unpainted chapel in a tiny hamlet 
known as Evans Manor; it belies its name, for it is neither a manor, nor 
do the folks living there bear such easy, pronounceable names as Evans. 
A Daily Vacation Bible School was held every afternoon for three weeks. 
As our missionaries visit in the homes they find much that should be 
changed, and we are hoping that the coming year will show a very definite 
step forward in genuine Christian living. Liquor and gambling are the 
horrors of these sections. Sex delinquency is a real problem because of 
the crowded homes, and one can only hope and pray that the influence of 
our teachers and the standards they set up will be effectual. 

Every day we are more grateful that The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society can carry on in Uniontown. Just now we are thinking especially 
of one of our junior girls who is a Syrian. Her home life is such that one 
wonders how a child can still be civilized with such an environment. The 
parents keep a vei'y small combination store, groceries, soft drinks, and 
liquor. During the past few months this family has been in court three times. 
The first time an officer came into their store to investigate some reported 
illegal proceedings. One of the older daughters attacked him and tore 
his sleeve from his coat. Or course, arrest was the result. The second time 
the whole family became involved in a sidewalk fight with an American 
family next door, which keeps a similar store. Arrests followed. However, 
the next day the Syrian junior and a junior girl from the American family 
were at Daily Vacation Bible School together, for these two children have 
always been the very best of friends. Both girls were very quiet, which 
is quite unusual. The last episode resulted in arrest and $1,000 fine for 
selling liquor on a local election day. We are so glad that these two girls 
like to come to the community house, and they are here many times a week 
when other groups are meeting. The little Syrian girl is very fine in dra- 
matics and did splendidly with the leading part in one of the little 
dramatizations at the closing program of the Daily Vacation Bible School. 

The theme for our schools this year was "building the home." American 
homes and homes of many lands were studied in every detail. Notebooks 




Above: Oliver No. 1 Chapel 



Below: McCrum Community House 



Bureaus. 177 

were made, using drav/ings and clippings from old magazines showing 
homes and their furnishings. The boys at McCrum made a little moving 
picture machine showing some of the different homes, and one little boy 
was given the task of fixing up the ideal American home. He did all the 
rooms, but balked when a bathroom was suggested, because he did not know 
what it was. A very careful explanation followed, with illustrations from 
magazines, but the movie is still minus the bathroom for the American home. 
This child lives in a Company house, and there is no bathroom in his home. 
This same little boy operated the movie machine while another child told 
all about the different homes, and did it very well. 

The worship periods were very dignified and helpful, and new hymns were 
learned as well as Psalms. A little girl from out of town came to the 
McCrum School as a visitor during the last week and the childi-en were 
amazed to find that she actually knew the one hundredth Psalm which they 
were just memorizing. There was much discussion about it at recess time 
that day. 

During the month of August we had a vesper service on Friday evening 
at Oliver instead of Sunday school on Sunday afternoon. We usually got 
there about 6.30 to get ready for the 7 o'clock service. One evening a little 
girl came in and began to talk, and although she is a real blonde, you could 
scarcely see a white spot any place, overalls and a sleeveless blouse, no 
shoes, all so dirty that one felt sure she would stick tight if she sat down. 
She helped do little things, and then we asked if she was coming to vespers. 
She I'eplied that she was too dirty, but her mother might give her a clean 
shirt. "I'll go home and wash." She was a little late, but when she re- 
tui-ned she fairly shone. About two weeks later the same thing happened 
with one of our boys. These little happenings mean much to us, for we 
feel that at least the children have learned cleanliness at our Community 
Chapel groups. The little girl belongs to a family which is very careless 
about the home and about personal cleanliness; and, in fact, one of the chil- 
dren stopped coming for a while because the children at school made so 
many remarks about her appearance. 

The women's club of McCrum had a very lovely porch party in June, but 
the evening turned so cool that the party had to be moved indoors and a 
fire in the fireplace added to the evening's enjoyment. They like to come 
to this attractive old home for their meetings. The first meeting held in 
September was a wiener roast. It is interesting to note how much real 
thought and care the members give to each other. We find they make 
friendly calls, send cards to the sick members, and do the little nice things 
which make life worth while. 

The women's club at Oliver sponsored a family picnic in July which was 
a great success and a day of real fun for mothers and children, about sixty 
in all. A large truck made two trips to a small natural park about ten 
miles from Oliver, and although the rain came down in torrents on the way 
home, this just added to the fun. We were able to secure reduced rates for 
bathing privileges, and I think some of the mothers and children spent 
most of the day in the water. 

We had a picnic here on the McCrum grounds for teen-age boys and girls 
in May for the Oliver group, and it would be difficult to describe the wonder 
they expressed about the house and the grounds. Our laundry is at the 
rear of the kitchen. In it are three stationary tubs and the washei". One 
of the boys went into the laundry and his eyes fairly bulged as he said to 
me, "Do youens own this laundry?" I explained that it was our laundry 
and the place where our clothes were washed, just like his mother washed. 
He said, "Well, with three tubs, three of you could work all at once, and it 
would not take long, would it?" 



Leisenringr No. 3 
Community Center 




178 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Leisenring No. 3 Community Center 

R. F. D., Dunbar, Pennsylvania 
May L. Webster, Superintendent 

I keep listening for the whistles in the morning, 

But the mines are still. 

No noise is in the air. 

And the children wake up crying in the morning, 

For the cupboai-d is so empty and so bare. 

And their little feet are, oh, so cold, they stumble. 

And I have to pin the rags upon their back. 

And our home is broken down and very humble, 

While the winter winds are blowing through each crack — 

Oh, it's hard to hear the hungry children crying 

While I've got two hands that want to do their share. 

Oh, you rich men in the city, 

Won't you have a little pity 

And just listen to a miner's prayer ? 

Down beneath the frozen ground the coal is laying. 

Only waiting till we dig it from its bed. 

While up above the earth each heavy heart is praying 

As each wife and mother wait with bowed-down head. 

Oh, we only ask enough to clothe and feed us, 

And to hear the little childi'en sing and play; 

And if we could give the things to those who need them, 

I know that would be a miner's happy day. 

IVfANY days that might have been very unhappy have been made bright 
because of our Community House on the hill, which offers practically 
all the religious and social life that the folks in the village have. The women 
look forward to their club meetings and to the festive occasions when 
Russian and Slovak, Italian and Polish mingle to exchange ideas in handi- 
work and also to learn something of the work of The Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society in other sections of our country. The girls are active in 
Queen Esther work and meet the payment of dues and other obligations 
by embroidering the stamped articles sent in the boxes of supplies. These 
articles are frequently exhibited and sold at the national meeting. 

Many of our young people are interested in Epworth League work, and 
it is nothing new to have them carry off the banner at district and sub- 
district meetings for various points of achievement. 

In the Sunday school we find a lively group of boys and girls who 
receive not only a knowledge of the Bible stories, but have set up for them 
standards for Christian living. The only religious instruction that many 
of these youthful members ever receive comes through the Center. 

Since our missionaries have had the car, our work has broadened, and 
several villages hidden back in the hills have had their abandoned chapels 
reopened and resound again with the music and voices of people at worship. 

With an increased amount of leisure time due to closed mines, the 
need for an intensive recreational program has added to the responsibilities 
of the workers. 

The co-operation of the county WPA recreational director was solicited, 
and immediately plans were made to transform the vacant lot adjoining 
the Community House and equip it for playground activities. The H. C. 
Frick Company was most generous in its contributions of see-saws, sand 
boxes, and swings. Croquet and baseball offer an outlet for the energies 
of young and old. The early fall will witness the beginning of a well- 
balanced physical, educational, and recreational program which will carry 
on through the winter months. 



Bureaus. 



179 



Esther Hall 

221 West Ninth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Sadie Markee, Superintendent 




]1J[Y, your room is pretty!" said a visitor of one of the girls at Esther 

Hall. "Somehow I thought since this was a church home it would 

be dull and unattractive, and here I find fresh curtains, dainty scarfs on 

the dressers, attractive spreads on the beds, and nice wooly rugs on the floor. 

Are all the rooms this nice?" 

We answer the girl's query truthfully by saying, "Yes." For our 
rooms are all well fui-nished. In the double rooms there is ample dresser 
and closet space for two girls' clothes and toilet articles. Curtains, spreads, 
and dresser scarfs are furnished. However, if the girls wish to redecorate 
their own rooms they are permitted to buy their own "trimmings" and work 
out their own color schemes. As a result, many of the rooms have quite 
a personal, "homey" look. Thei'e are several radios in the house, and it 
is quite a common sight to see five or six girls gathered in one room, perched 
on beds, chairs, and the floor listening to their favorite orchestras while 
they discuss their ambitions and problems. 

There are many types of girls in Esther Hall, but there seems to be a 
friend for every one. Life in the Hall itself resembles life in a school 
dormitory — meals at regular hours, everyone in by twelve o'clock, certain 
house rules endorsed by the girls themselves, and surprisingly enough, 
rigidly adhered to in most cases. 

Naturally to keep the girls so happy and contented we must, as the 
saying is, "do our part." Nourishing, wholesome food is served atti'actively. 
Our girls receive three meals a day; breakfast in the hall for everyone; cold 
lunches packed by those whose work will not permit their return to eat the 
hot lunch served daily in our dining room. Dinnertime is a meeting time 
for all the girls as well as the time for the greatest eflfort on the part of the 
kitchen staff. After dinner many of the girls gather in the two big parlors 
to read, play the piano, sing, or listen to the radio. 

The parlors are particularly attractive just now since the recent clean- 
ing and renovation. Since our building is old, some of the walls had 
rather bad cracks in them this winter. During the spring all the walls in 
the house were carefully inspected and thoroughly repaired. After the 
plasterers came painters, refinishing walls and woodwork. New curtains 
where needed, draperies cleaned, rugs and furniture scoured and polished, 
windows cleaned, flooi's refinished — all these things combined to make Esther 
Hall a new and shining and attractive home for the gii'ls who are with us. 

Proof of the desirability of Esther Hall as a home lies in loyalty of the 
girls themselves. Several have been here for years. Many have come 
back to us after leaving to find homes closer to work or families. To sum 
it all up, we might quote the woi'ds of a girl who left the other day after 
completing her course at a near-by school: "I do hate to leave. Everyone 
here is so nice to me. I like my room, and — well — I want to stay." 




City Missions — Friendship Homes 

Mrs. H. R. Harris, Secretary 

200 East Ninth Street, Wilmington, Delaware 



Mothers' Memorial Center 

547 West Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mrs. Willa F. Stewart, Superintendent 



HPhE many activities of effective service at Mothers' Memorial Center 

have become history. This Center is justly proud of its accomplishment 
in sharing- vv^ith and protecting the lives of the many boys and girls who 
have come under its supervision. While our regular activities are the 
Day Nursery and its affiliated Nursery School, the community has made 
other demands upon us for recreational and educational activities which 
are so badly needed in our neighborhood. We accepted their challenge. 
Therefore, we have done two worth-while things — rendered a great serv- 
ice, and have deepened the relationship between the community and the 
Center. Our present activities now — Day Nursery, Nursery School, clinic, 
boys' clubs, girls' clubs, glee club, mothers' club, rhythm band, N.Y.A. 
training class, adult education classes in elementary school subjects, vo- 
cational guidance, home economics, family relations. Vacation Bible School, 
and a library. 

Day Nursery. — At present our nursery is the only one for Negro chil- 
dren in the city. We are carrying a waiting list. In July, seventy-six 
children enrolled for nursery care. These children came from homes where 
one parent is the support of the family, or the mother is incapable of car- 
ing for her children. 

Nursery School. — This is a real training school for children from two 
to five years of age. The carefully planned environment encourages the 
greatest physical, mental, social, and emotional development of the chil- 
dren. These, and many more benefits, a large percent of our children 
would never enjoy but for Mothers' Memorial Center. Children who will 
not eat, will not drink milk, under weight, who run away from home, who 
fight, or do almost anything under the sun, are brought to us. Now the 
nursery stands as a panacea for children's problems. 

Clubs. — The Mothers' Club is the connecting link between the home 
and Center. The contact is invaluable. Mothers meet mothers whose prob- 
lems are the same. The teachers have a chance to observe parents and 
to know them better, and can interpret the reaction of their children by 
the temperament and intelligence of mothers. Mothers see the teachers 
as persons, individuals, friends. 

The boys' and girls' clubs, with an enrollment of eighty, ranging in ages 
from seven to sixteen, have experienced a very inspirational and profit- 
able year. Business meetings, games, handcraft, weiner roast, scrap- 
book contest, operetta, and discussions on courtesy, kindness, cleanliness, 
charm, punctuality, and general manners are some of the activities. The 
glee club and toy symphony enrolled sixty-seven, coming from different 
denominations — Methodist Episcopal, Catholic, African Methodist, Baptist, 
A. M. E. Zion. Twenty-five percent of them did not attend church school. 
They do now. 

N.Y.A. Training Class. — Twelve underprivileged girls who are being 
helped by the Federal Government, have been placed in the Center. They 
are taught the fundamentals of child psychology, household management, 
nursery-school methods, and domestic service. 

Adult Education Classes. — These classes are sponsored by the W.P.A. 
and Mothers' Memorial Center. There are four classes, with an enrollment 
of .seventy. 

(Continued on next page) 



Friendsliip Home 

549 West Seventh Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Mrs. Willa F. Stewart, Superintendent 




J^ HIS yeai- nineteen young women and forty-nine transients enjoyed the 

evening vespers, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter festivities. Very 
few homes appreciate their immediate family more at Christmastime than 
Friendship Home. The weeks prior were busy ones. Some were making 
presents, others purchasing theirs, all thinking of making someone else 
happy. They arose early in the morning and sang Christmas carols to the 
sick and aged folk of the community. Upon returning they conducted a 
Yuletide service. Breakfasting together, they put off for the day, each 
happy because she had endeavored to make someone happy. 

Easter is the climax of a real spiritual feast. The Lenten season and 
Holy Week services brought them to the Cross, then the glorious hope 
beyond. 

For eighteen yeai's Friendship Home has been a safety zone in one of 
the most thickly populated districts of Cincinnati. Many young women 
going to the city in quest of a better livelihood, and yet not acquainted with 
the religious and recreational life of the city, would have become the prey 
for the reckless, drunken, hit-and-run drivers of the moral and social life 
of the city had it not been for this Home. On the other hand, women who 
knew the city life — its virtues and vices — eagerly sought shelter because 
it was a safe abiding place — an ideal home. 

After a careful study of the communitly in which we are located, we 
feel that it is not enough for Friendship Home to be merely an abiding 
place, but its influence should go out in a definite way to help lift the com- 
munity to a higher standard of living. While the Home will still remain 
a Christian home for the young women away from home, mothers' clubs, 
adult education classes teaching vocational education, sewing, and hand- 
craft, and family relations, and other community activities, will be the 
Home's contribution toward raising the standards of the community. 

The administi^ation of affairs has not been without its crucial mo- 
ments. Mrs. William W. Foster, superintendent of Mothers' Memorial 
Center, resigned in May. Mrs. Clara J. Wilson, superintendent of the 
Home, who had arduously labored for seven years, resigned in June. 



(Continued from page 180) 

Daily Vacation Bible School. — Two hundred and twenty-eight children 
enrolled, representing fourteen denominations. Thirty-nine of these chil- 
dren had not attended any church. The boys chose as their theme, "Boys 
of the Bible." This seemed to grip the life of each boy, and many boy 
problems were solved. The juniors had the theme, "The Road to Happi- 
ness"; the Primary group, "God's Children Working Together"; the kin- 
dergarten, "Learning to Thank God''; the Intermediate Department, "Art 
in Religion." This school was a beautiful climax for our year's work. 
The kindergarten children in their "Worship Corner" each morning thanked 
God for something they had enjoyed. This corner became their saci-ed shrine. 
The intermediate children were asked why they came to the school. These 
were some of the answers: In order to be in a good place and keep off 
the streets. To learn about God, to meet Christian friends, to study the 
Bible, to learn the rules of good behavior, to learn how to work and play 
happily, and something interesting to do with my vacation. 




City Missions — North 
East Central 

Mrs. Edwin Sebring, Secretary 

334 Garson Avenue, 
Rochester, New York 



North Barre Coinmunity House 

101 Smith Street, Barre, Vermont 
Mrs. Edgar W. Sabin, Superintendent 

Jt is hard to summarize the result of a year's work in a community house, 
for the lives of its people have been influenced over a period of years. 
In looking back, this year the North Barre Community House has had sev- 
eral outstanding activities, and we trust that characters have been helped 
and strengthened in the process. 

The girls' gospel team, which was organized last year, had some splen- 
did meetings and held services in our chapel and in nearby churches. The 
outstanding girl of the group, Diana Biondi, had finished high school and 
wanted to go into social religious work. Her parents, particularly her father, 
discouraged it and thi'eatened to put her out of her home if she did such 
a thing. Businessmen of our own church group admired Diana for her 
stand, and had enough faith in her to go out among their friends and raise 
money to pay her carfare to Misenheimer, N. C, where she was able to 
attend Pfeiffer Junior College this past year. At the close of the year she 
came back enthusiastic about her school work, a leader in many groups, and 
eager to earn moi-e funds during the summer so that she could return to 
Pfeifi^er for another year. The gospel team, though terribly handicapped 
without their best speaker, has held services on various Sunday evenings 
and had their own weekly Bible study groups. 

The people who come to North Barre Community House and Chapel have 
contributed so generously that it has been possible to make some much- 
needed improvements to the basement of the church. Now our chapel, re- 
dedicated last year, has an attractive auditorium for worship, and down- 
stairs a large Boy Scout room decorated and arranged in true Boy Scout 
style by the boys themselves. New stairs and lavatories have been in- 
stalled, and everyone is looking forward to the time when the rest of their 
dream, a kitchen, will come true. 

At the Community House the Mothers' Club and other interested groups 
have raised funds for new inlaid linoleum for the kindergarten room. 
Groups were busy all winter presenting plans, having rummage sales and 
sample socials. Besides the above activities, the mothers paid dues for 
thirty members of The Woman's Home Missionary Society auxiliary, and 
gave fifty dollars toward the church improvements and twenty dollars in 
gifts to the Boy Scouts and the Girl Scouts. 

The kindergarten enrollment of forty-two was the highest we have ever 
had, and the average attendance of thirty-seven kept up even during hard 
snow and ice storms. The outstanding event for the little children this year 
was the presentation of two operettas, "Jolly Dutch Dollies," and "Little 
Red Riding Hood." It gave their Italian love of music and drama full ex- 
pression, and all the parents and friends were delighted. Kindergarten 
equipment was purchased with the proceeds. 

The boys and girls of the Daily Vacation Church School carried out a 
World Friendship program. Through stories and discussions on peace and 
war they led up to the activity of packing two suitcases to be sent to the 
refugee children in Spain. Some brought cash gifts to buy clothing, while 
others brought toys, games, books, soap, and towels. One little Spanish 
girl took home the instructions for a game and had her mother translate 
them into Spanish. 

182 



Bureaus. 



183 



Blodgett Memorial Coniniunity House 

950 Peace Street, Hazleton, Pennsylvania 
Grace Bate, Superintendent 

^HIS has been a great year for babies in the neighborhood served by 

the Blodgett Community House, and the work of the child welfare clinic, 
which is located in the Community House, has been an important link 
between the workers and the homes. 

The Mothei's' Club continued their fine service to needy mothers of 
the community by making and presenting them with layettes. In this way, 
incidentally, they have made many new contacts. These women are now 
members of the club, and have a grateful appreciation of what the club 
is doing for others, and the opportunities it brings to the members for a 
fine program of adult education, as well as wholesome social contacts. 

During the Lenten season early afternoon prayer groups were held in 
the homes of the women of the little mining settlements of Harwood and 
Hollywood. These women have requested that the prayer groups be con- 
tinued through the coming winter, as they felt that they received such 
blessings from them. 

For the last few years we have been stressing adult religious educa- 
tion, and this program went forward in a most encoui-aging way this past 
year. These groups often have guest speakers, ministers and teachers of 
the various churches, and in the men's club there was much interest mani- 
fested in the speakers brought from vocational groups, Christian laymen, 
who brought a broader outlook to these men who are so eager to learn. 

The second annual flower show was sponsored by the men's club, and 
the flowers were from the gardens of the club members, many of whom 
were very successful in the raising of flov>^ers. 

There is a fine spirit of helpfulness growing among the people. Es- 
pecially in the small mining village where there is so much unemployment, 
they are anxious to give their labor to help keep the Community House 
in good repair. At Hax-wood a large recreation room is being built in this 
way. All of the older groups who meet there ai'e working together to make 
it a reality, and in it, even in its unfinished state, were inaugurated many 
community activities that had been impossible before with such limited space. 

The work with the children in religious education was, as always, our 
greatest opportunity, and their response our greatest joy. In the Daily 
Vacation Bible School the children were given every opportunity to take 
active parts in a program that centered around their responses to Christ 
and his Way of Life. There were children of many nationalities and creeds, 
but in working together these differences seemed to be forgotten, and they 
were all striving to be good citizens of the Kingdom of Love — all one in 
Christ Jesus. A short time before the beginning of the Vacation School 
at Hollywood a sad accident occurred when one boy, handling a gun care- 
lessly, accidentally shot his friend in the eye, and it had to be replaced 
by an artificial eye. There was difficulty in finding the money for this, and 
the boys and girls of the Junior Department of the Vacation Bible School 
decided to make, as their handcraft project, lawn and garden ornaments, 
and sell them to raise the money to help this boy acquire his new eye. 
This was all done as a surprise, both to the boy who caused the accident, 
and who was broken-hearted, and to the boy who was to be benefited. 

Another year has passed with many spiritual adventures along the way, 
and many contacts with people who, through all their ups and downs, are 
showing an interest in a better way of life and a desii-e to know and serve 
the Master in this way. 






Italian Settlement 

^^^/'P^^^ 615 Mary Street, Utica, New York 
Helen Marie Edick, Superintendent 




"^C'^E LEARN most when we enjoy what we are doing, and we intend to 
repeat what we enjoy.'' This certainly typifies the attitude of the sev- 
eral thousand individuals with whom we have come in contact during the 
past year. 

If we had Alladin's lamp we might wish that the walls would bulge on 
certain occasions when the rooms are not large enough to hold the crowd, / 
or that each worker might be two in order to meet the demands. The^ 
hardest thing to say is, "I am sorry, there is no more room. Come earlier 
next time, and we v/ill see what we can do." ! This was true, not only of 
plays and entertainments, but of the story hour and handwork classes. In 
order to care for the large enrollment in metalwork and jewelry, wood- 
work and cooking, we ran these groups in ten or twelve-week courses, and 
at the end of the first session took in a new group in order to accommodate 
a greater number. We found that this in no way settled our problem. 
We had increased our numbers, to be sure, but we did not have them long 
enough to really feel that we accomplished anything of lasting value with 
them. So this coming year we will again have to turn away those who 
would come in order to do better work with the few. 

The domestic science department began their fall activities by can- 
ning tomatoes and peaches and making jelly and pickles. f This was a 
new experience for most of them, and they were delighted to learn in order 
that they might help with the canning at home. ■ Afterward, one ten- 
year-old girl canned forty quarts of tomatoes for her mother at homaj 
Sometimes the children took home all they made in class to share with theit 
families, but often the table was set and the food eaten in class. Much 
stress was put on manners and table service (how to eat soup or how to 
pass the milk pitcher), as this is almost unknown to many of the homes. 
The younger children would ask, "May we play, 'Please pass the milk?'" 
When one group visited the dining room upstairs where the workers eat, 
a child remarked, "Why, it's just like they eat in the movies!" Another 
said, "That's the way the rich peor)le eat." Each child kept a notebook 
with the recipes and an appropriate picture of each dish made. These 
were taken home once a month for the mothers and sisters to see. Work 
and cleanliness are play for these children. They washed dishes, scrubbed 
tables and even floors with the greatest of pleasure,^ Cleaning the bath- 
room was the favorite task, and the waiting list for this work was always 
the longest. The Settlement House is glad for the opportunity to provide 
this needed education for those who will choose home-making as a career. 

Small problems among nursery-age children develop into bigger problems 
in older children, and these in turn are a nucleous for delinquency. The 
Nursery School is not only caring for children while many of the mothers 
work, building up the bodies of underprivileged youngsters and looking 
after them physically, but helping these little tots to adjust themselves in 
the social order. 

Probably the most satisfactory work of the whole year was that done 
in the various organizations of The Woman's Home Missionary Society and 
the Sunday school. Our Mothers' Jewels, Home Guards, and Queen Esthers 
widened their interests in humanity by the study of the various nationality 
groups. 

184 



Bureaus. 



185 



City Missions — West 

Mrs. Frank E. Day, Secretary 

3439 Lyndale Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Davis Esther Hall 

347 South Fourth East Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Mrs. Margaret Platts, Superintendent 

Nelle Wright, Conference Deaconess Worker 

Really Davis Esther Hall has become a home for young ladies who 

are away from home, and is filling a need for Methodism. The house is 
filled to capacity most of the year, but not having been built for this pur- 
pose, we cannot care for a large number. If every life we touch can 
reach out to others, our strength will be increased greatly. 

Miss Nelle Wright, who has her home here, works in the whole conference, 
which includes the state of Utah and three churches in Nevada. 

Miss Wiight conducted more Vacation Bible Schools than she could 
take care of alone, so an assistant was secured to help her. 

These schools were not only for the children, but at each place a group 
of workers was trained to assist in the summer school who took the course 
of study, so that they could carry on through the year in the church 
schools. Schools were held in twelve towns in Utah and three in Nevada. 
A total of 789 boys and girls attended, and 85 local leaders were left 
ready to carry on during the year. 

It means much for boys who think they must be "tough" when they are 
eight years old, to be taught to sing "This Is My Father's World." One 
little fellow asked for the part of the prodigal son in the closing play 
that he might tell his experience in the school to the public. We cannot 
estimate the advance we have made this year in such work, but our Chris- 
tian people are truly encouraged. Scores of young people have very defi- 
nitely taken a stand for God in everyday living at the Young People's In- 
stitutes where our missionary workers are on the staff of instruction. I 
say Young People's Institutes instead of Epworth Leagues because our 
Protestant churches have united in institute work, and the young people 
are thrilled because they, too, can have large gatherings as well as the 
Mormons. 

A group of young people went home to their city, and learned the older 
members were considering closing their church because of the lack of leaders 
and funds. These young people met and asked the conference deaconess 
to be present. They said, "We can't let our church close." After talking 
and praying they said, "We will visit our membership and see if they will 
do their part in keeping our church open. It has been going nicely all year, 
and is stronger than before because some young people had their hearts 
warmed." 

Miss Wright writes: "It thrills me to think of winning so many of 
our boys and girls during the summer for God." 




186 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



"^ 



Esther Hall 

475 Twenty-fifth Street, Ogcden, Utah 
Anna Corneliussen, Superintendent 

IVf ISS MABEL DUNN, who has been the superintendent for many years, 
,was forced to resign on account of health conditions. She and her 
sister Anna still live in Ogden. 

Miss Corneliussen was ti'ansferred from Rock Springs to become su- 
perintendent. 

The house is nearly filled to capacity with young girls. The building 
has been refreshed inside, and we hope before long to do likewise outside 
and have an attractive center for gii'ls. We have no trouble renting the 
apartments. Miss Francis Knerr assists the pastor in our one Methodist 
church for all of Ogden. ; She also gave her time for some of the Church 
Vacation Schools and Young People's Institutes. 



Esther 
Hall 




Marysvale, Utah 
Mrs. Ruth Giffen, Pastor 

J' ES, wedding bells did ring! Miss Savin has taken a husband, but she 
continues to supply the church. We pay her allowance for her time. 
The church has gained much this year, and many fine improvements have 
been made and local interest created. 

One hundred attended the morning service of August 7, when the dis- 
trict superintendent preached and at the close performed the marriage cere- 
mony for Miss Savin and Mr. Charles Marion Giffen. Just as Miss Estes 
helped Milford to become self-supporting, so we expect Mrs. Giffen to 
lead these people to become a real conference appointment after a few years 
of help and care given by The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Bingham Canyon, Utah, and Copperfield, Utah 

Grace Wasen, Pastor 

^FTER a few months of readjusting — change of pastors and many things 
that can come to a church at times — a new pastor has been appointed 
and Miss Wasen begins work for us. For some years Miss Wasen was a 
missionary in the foreign field, and surely sometimes she will think she 
is still, for she has the peoples of Europe, Asia, Mexico, and our United 
State right in that big canyon in Utah. 

She assists in the church and visitation in Lower Bingham; works in 
Copperfield in community work; serves several other localities nearby, 
and daily works in the commercial life of our country. 

The canyon is full of boys and girls, and they must be won for Christ 
if America is to become Christian. 




Highland Boy " ^|p. ^mmr W W mm. 

Coinmunity House 

Route 1, Box 30 B, 
Bingham Canyon, Utah 

Ada Duhigg, Superintendent 




jy/jANY of the hardships the country has known the past year seem to 
be abroad in Highland Boy. Mine closings for different periods of 
time brought hardships and sufferings and hunger for many families. 

Can you really picture the work at our Highland Boy Community House ? 
The religious instruction is outstanding. Two hundred and fifty children, 
200 young people, and 250 adults have attended our Sunday school and 
church services; 300 were in the religious education classes. Twenty-three 
children were in the kindergarten day after day, where some of them learned 
our American language. Public school was much easier for them the next 
year. Seven hundred have been touched by clubs and classes. Nine na- 
tionalities constitute our group who come regularly. Thirty-two families 
have been given material relief; fifteen people have been assisted in find- 
ing employment; 209 garments and 47 baskets of food were distributed. 
In all, 17,518 contacts have been made. 

Assistance was given the county tuberculosis nurse by opening the 
Community House for a clinic; 240 came for the tests, and 240 returned 
for their reports. Miss Duhigg says, "That means our new car tires will 
be worn smooth taking these poor people to the county hospital in Salt Lake 
City for the needed attention." 

Dr. Richards, our fine doctor friend who comes to our Community House 
and conducts a tonsil clinic each year, removed thirty pairs of tonsils for 
those who cannot aft'ord hospitalization. Follow-up care was done by Vera 
Duhigg, our nurse. 

Little Henry was crying when our worker went into the home one 
morning. His mother said, "He wants more mush, and I have no more." 
From the Community House canned goods were sent and the case was 
reported to the county relief worker. 

We thank the Sunday-school class for a flood light in front of our House 
that lights the tiny playground and the whole front of the Community 
House. Children can play there evenings all summer and winter, and 
the long-desired community sings can really come true. What a fine 
thing for the hymns of the church to ring out in the canyon and echo on 
and on until some who have never heard shall have the privilege. 

The fence around the playground is a joy, for now we can furnish clean 
play in God's out-of-doors and compete with the dens of evil. Who dare.s 
say we will not ^vin out? 

How little of God's great world these people know when many of them 
spend their working hours under the ground in the mines. Son follows 
in his father's work, for possibly his life is taken early and the family 
must have food, or what else is there for him to do in that community? 
Few are able to go to college, so they go to the mines. 

This proves what can be done. One of the young women who has come 
to our Sunday school and church services belonged to our Queen Esther 
Circle, and has really found Jesus as her Saviour, has finished her first 
year in The National Training School at Kansas City, Missouri. This past 
summer she served as an assistant in the Community House, and has done 
good work. Our vei'y own Woman's Home Missionary Society child, and 
aren't her parents proud! 

187 



188 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Pavillion Project 

Rivevton, Wyoming 

Marie Newell, Superintendent 

Grace Arnold, Assistant 

'T'WENTY-FIVE square miles or more of territory out where the West 

unfolds is the pai-ish of these two girls. Two points are served with 
preaching- service, Sunday school, and Epworth League. It requires thou- 
sands of miles to be driven, hundreds of calls to be made in the homes, 
scores of needs cared for, sick to be nursed, hungry to be fed, naked to be 
clothed. 

How beneficial it would be if every member of our organization could 
spend one day with Miss Newell on this field. 

This is an example of what one day may demand. Early she is called, 
possibly by the undertaker of Riverton, asking for her help. A child has 
died out on the Project, could she help, as the parents are destitute, and 
clothing is needed for the burial. Miss Newell consents, and she goes 
to the basement. The clothing came in your Supply boxes. She selects 
suitable garments, possibly not what would suit you, but it looks wonder- 
ful to those bereaved parents who wondered how they would have any- 
thing. She returns to her usual home duties for a time. A rap at the door, 
and here is another call for help from the same family. Their shoes are 
full of holes, garments worn. "Please can you help with clothes fit for 
the funeral?" "Surely; come right in, the ladies of our missionary so- 
ciety have made it possible by sending us boxes of clothing," is the reply. 
And this family is clothed for the funeral. 

The telephone rings. The undertaker speaks, "Will you kindly con- 
duct the service for the child's funeral tomorrow?" "Yes, those people 
live in our parish." 

In the meantime someone must vouch for the needs of this family in 
order to have the county pay the funeral expenses, and who else knows 
these people who live twenty miles away except the deaconess ? 

Ihe day is rapidly going, but several other matters must be taken 
care of. Someone must sing at the service; arrangements must be made 
for neighbors and friends to be brought in by other neighbors who have 
cars. And so the day goes by. 

Someone said, What would these people do if it were not for our dea- 
coness ? Who knows ? We are glad our representative is there helping. 
The deaconess is also called for when babies come, and she furnishes cloth- 
ing for many babies from your boxes. Often she has cared for the mother 
and baby in the absence of a doctor'. 

One little girl said to Miss Newell, "Do you know where I sleep?" 
Miss Newell looked around the one-room house and said, "No, where?" 
"On the top of the boiler," and the child told her how her mother turned 
the wash boiler upside down against the wall and put something over it, 
and she used that for her bed. 

Miss Newell gave six weeks for promotional work in the conferences 
last spring, and while she was away from Pavillion her planned program for 
the six Sundays was carried on by the local people evei'y Sunday. We 
hope to do twice as much this year with two workers. 

Rock Si>rings, Wyoming 

Sarah Taylor, Church Deaconess 

T^^HE Board of Home Missions and Church Extension is doing their part 
in helping Methodism to administer to Rock Springs and surrounding 
territox-y. Rev. Richard Lungren is the pastor, and united effort is being 
made to establish a self-supporting Methodist church in this mining and 
railroad center of the state of Wyoming. 

Miss Taylor has been training the youth to be able to carry on their 
work, as eventually they will be the adults of the church. There ai"e many 
fine churches for "the foreign groups, who care very nicely for their peo- 
ple. Our Community House was closed last year as such. 




Iowa National Esther Hall 

921 Pleasant Street, Des Moines, Iowa 
Mrs. J. M. Williams, Superintendent 

j^HE Iowa National Esther Hall continues to oflFer a Christian home to 

girls and young women working in the city or attending business college 
or schools of beauty culture, preparing to become self-supporting. The 
beautiful brick building, high on a hill at the edge of the business dis- 
trict, offers such a convenient and pleasant living place that every room 
is always full, with many girls waiting to come in. Recently an application 
was made by a young man who had heard what a lovely home it was, 
but who did not realize it was a home only for girls and women. 

A staff of eight trained workers are kept busy with the necessai'y 
work of caring for these seventy-five girls. Three wholesome meals are 
served each day. Besides ministei'ing to our happy family, 538 transients, 
largely relatives and friends of the girls, have been cared for in the Home. 
A friendly supervision throws a protective restraint ai'ound the girls and 
wards off dangers that might threaten those unaccustomed to city life. 

Parties and holiday observances give pleasure and social enjoyment, 
and Christian counsel smooths away many a difficulty and solves many a 
problem for these girls away from their own homes and families. 

The beautiful court at the back of the building, with its white arbor 
and blooming flowers and climbing vines, brings quietness and happiness 
to the girls after a strenuous day of labor. The high hill at the back gives 
a privacy for sun baths and forms of recreation. During the hot weather 
many girls sleep there at night. 

Several improvements have been made this year on the building. The 
redecorating of our kitchen and serving room, including the laying of new 
linoleum, has added much enjoyment to the workers in the routine of their 
daily tasks. The large, spacious parlor has been redecorated. A new hot- 
water heater has been installed, and a 4,200 gallon hot-water boiler has 
been replaced, beside other minor improvements. 

The loyal support of the auxiliary women of the Iowa conferences 
with barrels of fruit, jams, jellies, bedding of all kinds, dresser scarfs, 
is greatly appreciated. Last week an auxiliary sent two barrels of tomatoes 
and requested two more barrels of empty jars. That is an example of the 
kind-hearted women who are supporting this institution. 

The location of the building adapts itself to many activities, since it is 
so close to the downtown district. When the family is eating breakfast, 
in comes a fine group of nurses from the Methodist Hospital for class work. 
The chemical laboratory and domestic science rooms are used for that pur- 
pose. The interdenominational ministerial association, Wesley Foundation 
meetings, district superintendents, sectional conferences of state conven- 
tions, lectures for the physicians of the city, missionary groups, and young 
people's committee meetings and The Woman's Home Missionary Society 
of the lowa-Des Moines Conference, who use two large rooms in the base- 
ment in social service work under the supervision of a deaconess, all make 
this a center. You can leadily see what a busy and complicated life we live. 

189 




Hospitals 

Mrs. Robert Stewart, 
Secretary 

Secaucus, New Jersey 



Medical Mission Dispensary 

36 Hull Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
Catherine L. Perry, Superintendent 



JcEVIEWING the past year at the Mission, we are hiappy to know that 

there has been an increase in the number we have been able to serve in 
all our departments. The clinics are busy places, each day bringing differ- 
ent groups to be ministered to. While emergencies are taken care of 
immediately, at any time of the day or night, we cannot open all of our 
eight clinics every day, but they are all run two or three times each week. 
There are medical, surgical, eye, ear, nose, and throat; pediatric clinic 
for children; dental; a woman's clinic and pi-enatal clinic; and a physio- 
therapy clinic for those who suffer from arthritis. Evening clinics care 
for those who cannot come in the daytime. 

While we do no major surgery, we are fully equipped to do tonsil and 
adenoid operations and minor work that does not require long hospitaliza- 
tion. About sixteen tonsil operations are performed each week. 

Our affiliation with the Community Health Association has been very 
helpful in our district maternity work and the Mothers' Club, which meets 
each week in conjunction with our prenatal clinic. We have averaged forty 
patients a day during the year in our clinic. 

Although our work is medical and not settlement work, we do a very 
vital social welfare work. Babies are supplied with clothing in the numer- 
ous families where the income is insufficient to buy clothing. Through the 
Supply Department of our Society we ai'e enabled to be of great assistance 
in these cases. Many mothers are able to remodel used clothing for larger 
children. There is always need of clothing for children of school age, 
especially for boys' clothing, and this is rarely included in the boxes sent 
to us. The scrap books and Sunday-school papers are given out and 
greatly enjoyed by both parents and children. 

Were it not for the Christmas boxes sent each year, there would be 
many forgotten families at the Christmas season in the North End of Bos- 
ton. Early in the fall plans are made at the Mission, and the people in the 
neighborhood begin to look forward to the Christmas festivities. These 
continue through the entire week, for our quarters are too small to hold 
all that come at one session. Groups are divided in various ways. Last 
year all children whose tonsils had been removed during the year were in 
one group. Another group was the mothers and babies of the parental 
clinic of that year. Later older and younger groups were entertained. 
Packages containing mittens, gloves, toys, stockings, beads, babies' cloth- 
ing, and blankets — anything that is sent to us that can be used and enjoyed 
by these people who have so little. We have on our list 122 families with 
children totaling 678 — so you see how much we need to have in order to 
give even one toy to each child. 

One of the city's emergency relief stations has been closed in our 
neighboi'hood, and that brings more patients to the Mission. This station 
cared for accident cases, and we are now getting many of these cases be- 
cause of the distance to any other agency. We are looking forward to the 
busiest year of our history, and pray that we may be able to meet all the 
demands made revealing the Christ in our ministry of health. 

190 



Brewster Hospital 

7th and Jefferson Streets, 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Clara L. Kreuger, 
Superintendent 




Phis year has slipped by so rapidly, it seems incredible that it has gone, 

and we must look back over it and make a report of its accomplishments. 
There has been an increase in the work of both the hospital and the out- 
patient department, increase in patients and increase of responsibility 
upon all who share in this caring for the large group to which we minister. 

An aroused interest in health examinations throughout the city has 
resulted in 3,945 visits to our social disease clinic. There have been 1,269 
visits to the pre-natal clinic, which is operated in co-operation with the 
City Health Department, and is an important factor in the effort con- 
tinually being made to reduce the maternity death rate of Jacksonville. 
In all our clinics, which are opened every day in the week, there have been 
7,764 visits. 

The social service worker has made 738 calls in the homes of patients, 
doing follow-up work as well as routine investigations. Free work to the 
amount of $25,999.06 has been given during the year. The incubator in- 
stalled last year has been of great service to a large number of premature 
and delicate babies, helping to give them the right start in life. Twins 
born to one young mother kept up our record of at least one pair a year. 

The outstanding achievement of the year was the building of an addi- 
tion on the Nurses' Home last fall, which added seven bedrooms, a sitting 
room, and a large auditorium, where our own commencement exei'cises were 
held. It was a great delight to have Mrs. Goode and Mrs. Freeman attend 
the dedication exercises in December, when a large number of prominent 
local people, including the mayor, were present. The students have en- 
joyed a real chapel for the morning services, and the commencement pro- 
grams and receptions were delightful and interesting. 

In June the building was turned over to the State Medical Association 
for their convention, and they had never been entertained in nicer quar- 
ters. Clinics and lectures were held morning, noon, and night for an entire 
week, and 143 doctors fi-om many states, including Florida, Georgia, the 
Carolinas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana were in attendance. Many 
wives accompanied their husbands, and receptions and teas on our beauti- 
ful grounds were planned for them. All agreed that Brewster Hospital 
is the outstanding hospital for Negroes in the South. 

The standards for nurse training schools are being raised each year, 
and the heavy teaching schedule required the addition to the staff of a 
full-time instructor, who has taken over a large part of the teaching done 
formerly by busy doctors who through the years have given willingly of 
their time. 

The two objectives for this year are: shorter affiliation for the senior 
girls who now go to Grady Hospital in Atlanta for contagious and men- 
tal diseases, and the erection of a contagious pavilion through the co-oper- 
ation of the city. There are no facilities for the care of contagion among 
the colored people at the present time, although contagious diseases are 
prevalent at all times of the year. We hope these will be achieved before 
another report is written. 

Christmas was a joyous season even among our little crippled children, 
some of whom have been with us a long time, and others who had never 
had such a Christmas before. Again we thank the Supply Department for 
the boxes sent, and urge you to remember us this coming year. The stu- 
dents enjoy the carolling in the early morning through the streets and 
through the hospital. The Christmas trees on every floor kept in the minds 
of patients and visitors alike that because a Babe was born in a manger, 
this fine institution is here to restore them to health and happiness, a 
chance they would otherwise never have. 

191 



192 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Sibley Memorial Hospital 

1140 North Capitol Street, Washington, D. C. 
Dr. Lewis H. Taylor, President 

l-fAVING always been a busy institution, the past year has been no ex- 
ception for Sibley Memorial Hospital. Even during the summer months, 
which ai'e supposed to be the slack months for hospital work, the activities 
did not slow down. In July, 197 babies were born, the greatest number 
in any one month thus far this year. No doubt our record of 1937, with 
2,059 babies, will be broken in 1938. The greatest improvement in our 
maternity department, and one which fills a longfelt need, was the setting 
up of a receiving ward. In this ward, equipped with the newest type of pre- 
delivery obstetrical beds, the expectant mothers receive obstetrical service, 
which has for its aim their safety and comfort. The air-conditioned delivery 
rooms and nurseries add still further to the comfort of both mothers and 
babies. By a rearranging of space a nursery has been established for 
the reception and treatment of sick babies. 

It is difficult to say which department has been the busiest. The fact 
that 5,025 operations wex-e performed, an average of 418 a month, indicates 
that the surgical service was especially active. In the dispensary, 4,469 
patients received medical attention, an average of 371 persons a month. 
The dispensary sei'vice has been reorganized, the room arrangement made 
more convenient, and the entire unit more attractive. 

A full-time pharmacist is in charge of the pharmacy. This department 
and the dispensary are now self-sustaining. 

The most important piece of equipment acquired by the Hospital within 
the past year is an X-ray therapy machine used in combating cancer, one 
of mankind's most terrible afflictions. The purchase of this special equip- 
ment was made possible by the Woman's Guild of Sibley Hospital. Not 
only has this organization assumed the buying of the X-ray machine at a 
cost of $8,000, but it supplies the Hospital with linen each year and helps 
many unfortunate persons who have needed hospitalization but could not 
meet their bills in full. This group of some 1,800 men and women from the 
Methodist churches of the city and community does a great work for Sibley. 

Last May twenty-eight young women graduated from the School of 
Nursing. Many expressed the opinion that the commencement exercises 
were the most beautiful and impressive ever held. As the student was 
presented with her diploma and the school pin, she was given a small lamp, 
receiving her light from the lamp of Florence Nightingale, who was im- 
personated by a member of the staff. 

Another very impressive service of the Training School is the "Capping 
Service," at which time the pi'eliminary students are given their caps and 
they become real student nurses. The students feel as great a joy when 
they receive their caps as they do when they receive their diplomas. 

Sibley Hospital, with its bed capacity increased now to 347, is holding 
the place it has made for itself in the hearts of many Washingtonians, and 
its efficiency for service, "Service with kindness to those who suffer" is 
ever uppermost in the minds of those who are responsible for its progress. 




mm A mmM 



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Bureaus. 



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193 




Indian 

Mrs. L. E. Hoover, Secretary 

1319 North Thirty-eighth Street, Lincoln, Nebraska 



Yuma and Cocopah 
Methodist Mission 



Yuma, Arizona 

Rev. Adolph M. Krahl, 
Superintendent 



JN APRIL the new superintendent. Rev. Adolph M. Krahl, and Mrs. Krahl 

and their two boys went to Yuma to begin their work. During the hot 
summer months, with the thermometer over 100 nearly every day since 
Api'il, the living quarters for the missionary have been renovated throughout 
and many of the broken pieces of furniture have been replaced by usable 
pieces. This work was made possible by a gift from an interested con- 
ference. The community hall and church are now in splendid condition and 
are being used by a large group of Yuma people for the various activities 
during each week. 

The Yuma Indians are showing a splendid spirit of co-operation. A 
group of men worked one day this past summer, with the thermometer of 
106, building a wall and steps back of the church. The steps make it possi- 
ble for the people from the reservation to reach our church without a much 
longer walk than the seven or eight miles which many of them make each 
time they come to our Mission. The men are justly proud of these steps, 
and they do improve the appearance of the property. 

Two shower baths installed in a shed on the property are constantly in 
use by the Indians. They are also taking pride in the grounds, caring for 
cactus and flower beds, which help to beautify the barrenness of the Arizona 
desert. 

Attendance at all meetings has grown. Seven babies were baptized in 
the past three months. 

The economic problem on the reservation continues to be a grave one. 
We have been endeavoring to help in evei-y way possible to assist the people 
in finding woi'k or some means of livelihood. 

Interest on the Cocopah reservation continues to grow. When the mother 
of one of our men died this summer he came to ask our missionary to con- 
duct a Christian burial. The tribe elected one of their young men as the 
interpreter, and he is assisting our superintendent in the work at our chapel. 

This past year another small group of Cocopahs asked that we hold 
services for them. Our superintendent has been holding services in the 
open regularly and attendance is growing. 

Our missionaries here need the prayers of every auxiliary woman, as 
they endeavor to sei've at this needy and difficult place, to lead these people 
to know the Christ. 



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Above: Yuma Indian Mission 
Below: Cocopah Chapel 



i 

■ 





Navajo Methodist Mission School 

Farming'ton, New Mexico 
Charles C. Brooks, Superintendent 

Jn OCTOBER, 1936, our new school building' was dedicated with suitable 
ceremonies. Bishop Ralph S. Cushman gave the dedicatory address, 
assisted by Mrs. W. H. C. Goode, national President. Many of the national 
and conference officers attended the dedication services or visited our School 
en route to their homes from the Seattle meeting. A large crowd of visitors, 
townspeople, and Navajo friends attended the service. 

Requests for admittance to our School have never been so numerous as 
this year. We have increased our enrollment, but because of dormitory 
space and the present budget we have had to say "no" to so many boys and 
girls who are anxious to attend our School. Our high-school boys are 
crowded with six and eight in small rooms. The parents say, "Our children 
are different when they attend a mission school." 

In June we were host to the regional convention of the National Fellow- 
ship of Indian Workers. This v/as not an easy task, as many of our staff 
were away on vacations, and over 100 persons were in attendance for the 
three days. Delegates from more than eight different denominations serv- 
ing on reservations in the Southwest, as well as many government Indian 
service people were in attendance. All spoke in highest praise of the very 
efficient superintendent and staff and the fine plant at our Navajo School, 
particularly the very fine care which each building receives. 

We are looking forward to next spring, when we will graduate the first 
high-school class. Most of these young people are earnestly praying that 
some way will open that they may go on to a Christian college to better fit 
themselves for work among their people. We must find a way, as these 
students are not mature enough to go back on the reservation now, and 
must have further training. In adding the last year of high school, we are 
planning to teach silver-smithing and rug-weaving. 

In addition to the school work during the winter months, a very neces- 
sary part of our work is the reservation calling during the summer months. 
An interesting report from Mr. Brooks, who has been doing the calling 
this summer, gives a picture of the many helps given these needy people. 
He writes: "Visits have been made to twelve homes of students. Twenty- 
six different students and their parents have been touched this month as 
well as eig'ht former students. Three hospital calls have been made on 
students. In order to do this we traveled just a little less than 700 miles. 
Experiences ranged all the way from conducting a funeral to catching a run- 
away team. Just this week I called on one family from which we have three 
boys and a girl in school. About a year ago the mother died. When I 
arrived at this home I found the father working at a little table in the one- 
room house. He is a silversmith, and with the help of the twelve-year-old 
girl is trying to make a living and keep house for this family. The youngest 
boy was playing outside and the two older boys, aged nine and thirteen, 
were just starting away to hoe weeds in a neighboring garden. The mother 
of this family had been an unusually fine Christian woman, and neither 
the father nor the children have yet recovered from the shock of her death. 
After a little visit, during which we had Bible reading and a prayer together, 
the father and I went over to the field where the two boys were working 
for a little chat with them before I started on to the next place. One would 
have to know very well the monotony and loneliness of these very isolated 
homes to realize what these visits mean to both children and parents." 

194 



i " 




Ponca Methodist 
Mission 

Ponca City, Oklahoma 

Rev. Don J. Klingensmith, 
Superintendent 

TThE past year has been one of progress in the work of the Mission along 

many lines, as we have served over 900 Indians. Our church people have 
been more interested in carrying the gospel to others than ever before. At 
the beginning of the year some members of the Tonkawa Tribe came to our 
meetings and asked our superintendent to come over and minister to them. 
When the matter was presented to our church members, they gladly co- 
operated in arranging the schedule to include the Tonkawa people. 

The Tonkawas are a small remnant of a once large tribe, living on the 
northwestern border of the Ponca reservation. They have never had a 
missionary; their contact with the church has been through their marriage 
into_ other tribes and the radio. Meetings have been conducted in the homes. 

The next call came from the Government boarding grade school at 
Pawnee. The officials urged our superintendent to come dowTi once a week 
to conduct Bible classes. The students are mostly from broken and neglected 
homes. There are many who have not even heard that Jesus had been raised 
from the dead. Of the 225 students enrolled, there was an average attend- 
ance of about 200 at the classesP Later we found that this opening was one 
for which many had been praying. At the close of the year some children 
said, "We have learned all about the New Testament." They were urged to 
continue studying. 

Our third opening came by the Rural Resettlement Administration buy- 
ing the old 101 Ranch and moving about thirty families on it. Our members 
helped in special meetings at a schoolhouse to get a church and church 
school started. This work will become part of the Annual Conference this 
fall. Doing this service helped us to get contacts with a group of Indian 
families that had never been reached before. Some of the old men there 
are especially interested in knowing Jesus. 

The spirit of the people of the Mission is very encouraging. Members 
are assuming more responsibility for the church work. Last year they 
raised more cash by subscription and collection than in any previous year. 

In co-operation with the Government agencies, the women are beginning 
to take more intelligent interest in their homes. They are doing more of 
their own sewing and quilt making and several gardens were raised and 
much canning done. Our boys and girls take their share of pi'izes at 4-H 
exhibits. Several of the men are working steadily, and, a few are doing 
their own farming. ^ ■ ^' ' 'J 

r.Xhilocco Agricultural and Industrial/ School continues to be a very im- 
portant and inspiring part of the work. Attendance at Epworth League 
on Wednesday nights averaged about sixty. It was also our privilege to 
preach at the chapel services one Sunday a month. Of the 700 students 
90 were enrolled as Methodists. 7The Presbyterian Indians have asked the 
superintendent to minister to their students also this coming year. 

The repairing of the chui'ch, made possible by the gift of the Church 
Extension Department of the Board of Home Missions, has greatly cheered 
us. Our people contributed both time and money. 

The happenings officially off the record have come to our notice that 
are a part of the fruit of mission work. One of our young men. a college 
graduate, is teaching in an isolated i-ural school in the eastern part of 
Oklahoma. Seeing the need, he has organized a Sunday school, preaches 
to the people, and supervises a community club for community betterment. 
The other was the co-operation of one of our families with their white 
neighbors in starting a Sunday school in one of the remote sections of the 
reservation. 

195 




Potawatomi 
Methocli§t Mission 

Mayetta, Kansas 

Rev. J. H. Schlapbach, 
Superintendent 



¥ AST spring our superintendent felt that a great moral victory had been 

made v^^hen the Potawatomies voted dry on the repeal question. An 
entirely different stand had been taken just tv^^o years previously. The mov- 
ing of the Government Agency from Mayetta will add to our responsibility. 
More Indians will naturally come to our missionaries now with their many 
troubles. 

Recently a young man came to the Mission and asked the superintendent 
if he could come to his house and preach a funeral sermon for his father. 
They were going to have an all-night "wake." He arrived about eight o'clock, 
sat quietly and listened to others talk for about an hour, then he was called 
on and told to take his time, say all he wanted to and was at liberty to 
conduct any kind of service he wished. When Mr. Schlapbach was ready to 
return home aften ten o'clock they asked if he would return the next night 
and preach another sermon and then come back the following day and assist 
in the burial service. 

A most encouraging advance on the reservation has been the organiza- 
tion of a troop of Boy Scouts. In co-operation with the Government officials 
we have recently perfected this organization with sixteen Boy Scouts. Two 
fine young Indian men were appointed as scoutmaster and assistant scout- 
master. 

In spite of snow and ice of the winter months, we have carried on sur- 
prisingly well. When the ground was covered with ice the boys came to 
the meetings on skates, some of them skating five miles to the meeting and 
back home. Of course the sport of skating, as well as the interest in the 
meeting, added to the attraction. However, much can be said for the 
enthusiasm of the boys and the interest of their parents in scouting. The 
Oath and Law of Boy Scouts of America provide every requirement for 
the highest type of character and Christian citizenship. We will have ac- 
complished a most worthy task when we have aided the Indian boy to 
possess the ideals of another who "Increased in wisdom and stature and in 
favor with God and man." 

Many near-by auxiliaries have spent a day during the past year at the 
Mission. They brought food and spent the day mingling with our Indian 
women, buying their handiwoi-k and giving special talks and songs which 
helped so much. Other auxiliaries are planning to visit the Mission this 
winter. 

In May the Topeka District Queen Esther convention was held at our 
church. Our Queen Esther girls enjoyed sharing in the program and the 
association with girls from the entire district. 

As soon as our Queen Esther girls returned from school, meetings were 
held each Thursday. Twenty-seven were present at the picnic held at the 
home of one of our women. 

Mrs. Schlapbach writes of the very great need for layettes and yard 
goods. The conferences have been most generous in the gifts in the past, 
but just now our supply room is empty. We never have enough layettes, 
yardage goods, comforters, and clothing. All these supplies assist our self- 
help fund and serve the people who have so little money. 

196 



Bureaus. 



197 



Mexican and the Southwest 

Laura May Robinson, Secretary 

426 Lake Street, Oak Park, Illinois 

Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Maternity Hospital 

1109 East Fifth Street, El Paso, Texas 
Emma Brandeberry, Superintendent 

J[ HE great event of the past year was the dedication of Freeman Clinic 
and Newark Confei-ence Maternity Hospital. When the last report was 
made the building was completed and work started, but it was not until 
October 27, when our national officers and many otherscame to El Paso, 
that the formal dedication of this new building took placed . About the same 
type of work has been carried on but in a much better way, due to new 
equipment and more space. Two hundred and sixty-four babies were born 
in Newark Hospital, more than a hundred increase over last year. Two 
hundred and seventy-five tonsil cases were cared for, with always more on 
the waiting list for this service. Almost 20,000 people were interviewed and 
service given them during the past year. Through necessary follow-up work 
in the homes, especially in the baby cases, the nurses are better able to 
understand their needs. 




The Christmas baby party was a great joy to witness as the babies born 
at Freeman Clinic and Newark Hospital during the past year came together. 
Each baby received a small gift and the program was furnished by the 
kindergarten children. Vai'ied were the voices of appreciation from these 
precious bundles of pink and blue. One grandmother brought a small mother- 
less baby to the party to show her appreciation for what the nurses had done 
for her daughter and baby. She is anxious to learn all she can in the right 
way to care for babies. 

The clinics for children are large, as the people are learning to come 
to see the doctor and nurse when their children are first taken sick rather 
than waiting for days and sometimes weeks. Inoculations are given at the 
request of the parent, and we are thereby helping to prevent epidemics which 
can spread so easily in crowded quarters. Our nurses and doctors, all fine 
Christian young people, are eager to serve. They give of their best to these 
people with no thought of reward other than to see people well again. 

We are grateful to kind friends everywhere who made our building pos- 
sible. Another year is ahead of us, and we all ask for greater strength 
to serve, and with your prayers and interest much can be accomplished in 
His Name. 



198 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 




Rose Gregory Houchen Seltlement 

1119 East Fifth Street, El Paso, Texas 
Emma Brandeberry, Superintendent 



^/ ITH our thoughts turned toward city work for the coming year, we can 
look back over the activities of the past year at this vital point in the 
United States, where so many Mexicans come across from another country. 
What do they think of our country, and v/ill they find the right kind of asso- 
ciates ? We are glad when a newcomer seeks out the Settlement, for we 
are able to make another contact and try to prove that this is Chiistian 
America. 

The kindergarten is an interesting place to visit. Here we find fifty 
or more little children who have come for a morning of activity. They come 
early, for there are certain toys they hope will be theirs to play with for 
a period. After they sing, play, listen to stories, have handwork, comes the 
time for milk and crackers. We are ever grateful to the juniors everywhere 
for making this lunch possible. For some children this is the only milk 
that they get, and so we wish that we might fill the cunning little cups just 
a bit fuller. Perhaps another year we can. 

Various classes are held in sewing, cooking, manual training, and handi- 
craft for all ages. The spring exhibit is a happy time when parents and 
friends can see the results of the year's labor. Then the articles go to the 
proud maker. 

Daily Vacation Bible School meets a need when school is not in session. 
The weekly religious education class meets once a week. More than 13,000 
people came to the Settlement for clubs and classes. 

The playground continues to be a source of great joy and pleasure. 
There are various activities in the near-by park sponsored by the city, but 
our playground remains a popular place. We hope we may have a full- 
time playground director and put on a more worth-while program for girls 
and boys. 

Our connection with the Mexican Methodist Church is very pleasant. A 
new pastor with more experience was appointed, and we hope for a more 
complete church program with our work and workers. The Sunday school 
has an attendance of 150 to 200, and the classes meet all over our buildings 
and at the church. Our girls take an active part in this church and also in 
the various activities of youth in the city, both English and Mexican. Sev- 
eral of our own girls were on the staff during the past year. 

Houchen is a lighthouse in a congested section, and we hope that the 
light of encouragement and help will ever burn as people come for help. 



Bureaus. 199 

Harwood Girls' School 

1114 North Seventh Street, Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Verr H. Zeliff, Superintendent 

#~^NE hundred and thirty-one girls were enrolled at Harwood during the 
school year of 1937-38. About one fifth of these were placed in the 
School because of the inability of the parents to make homes for the girls 
and at the same time earn money enough to support them. We are con- 
tinually turning away children who need a home. The other four fifths 
are at Harwood because of the school work. It is the same old story — so 
many sections have no schools. We are being besieged with applications 
from people living on ranches. Last year school busses picked up their 
children, but this bus service has been discontinued. Each year we have 
about twice as many applications as we can take care of. 

If we keep our credit we must meet definite requirements made by the 
State of New Mexico, and so we have tried to make some additions to the 
library to help meet these. The library is being catalogued and rearranged 
to make it more nearly meet the requirements of a well-organized library. 
Many new books were added last year. 

Since Harwood is one of nine accredited high schools in the State of 
New Mexico, it means that our girls are having the type of education that 
will fit them for the university. Several public programs are put on each 
year and the people in the city seem to enjoy them. The music department 
from its earnings bought a rheostat and a baby spotlight for the stage in 
the gymnasium. The two outstanding clubs were for grade girls, the music 
lovers' club, and the dramatic club. The latter presented two marionette 
entertainments. The music lovers' club gave an operetta, and with the 
proceeds bought a small radio for the girls' living room. 

The neighborhood clubs are an interesting project of the social service 
work. One hundred and fifty-eight gifts were wrapped and distributed 
at Christmastime to the needy in the sawmill district. 

When spring comes all thoughts turn to camp. We are fortunate to 
have the use of the Y.W.C.A. camp, not many miles from the city. Two 
groups went this year. A large dormitory, containing bunks for forty girls, 
has been added to the camp, and this was quite a change from sleeping on 
the floor. 

Religious activities are a vital part of the School life. Sunday school 
is held at the School each Sunday morning at nine o'clock. The elementary 
classes are taught by the junior and senior girls, while the upper classes 
are taught by the teachers. Epworth League groups for diff"erent ages meet 
each Sunday evening. Girls are permitted to join the Epworth League at 
the Spanish Church if they desire, and all students attend either the First 
Methodist Church or the Spanish Methodist Church. Chapel exercises held 
on Friday morning are sponsored by the teachers and the girls often take 
part. Every student in the School is enrolled in a weekday Bible class. 

On the last Friday morning of the school year the recognition breakfast 
was held, at which time recognition was made of work done during the 
school year. All girls having an average of ninety or above in all subjects 
were placed on the honor roll and recognition given to girls who have done 
work in music, athletics, and extra curricular activities. Four juniors 
were appointed to the honor group of the School. 

Many women visited the School before and after the national meeting in 
Seattle, and we were glad to have them see the girls in their school activities 
and life. 



Harwood Girls' School 




200 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Methodist Sanatorium 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Mrs. Minnie G. Gorrell, Superintendent 

'J'HE most outstanding event of the year was the celebration of our twenty- 
fifth anniversary on September 1, 1937, which has been told and retold 
many times. Memories of that glad occasion still linger, and with it the 
inspiration that it brought. Our work of healing ministry to the many 
who come from all parts of the country goes on as it has for the past quarter 
of a century. 

The question is asked so often, Do the sick people ever make the cure 
and remain well ? We wish that all could claim the cure, but so many come 
to the Southwest when they are too ill to be cured anywhere. Sometimes 
the days and nights are made easier for a time. Others are made well or 
greatly benefited. It was gratifying this past year to send out several 
patients who have recovered their health. One young lady is doing secre- 
tarial work in a business office; another one is teaching in one of our 
schools; a professional man has opened an office in the city and is carrying 
on a successful business. At the present time we have a young man who 
is attending business college and working part time; also a young attorney 
who is taking an extra course. Both will soon be able to take their places 
in the business and professional world. 

The ideal of the Sanatorium with reference to charity is to render an 
efficient and kindly service at a moderate rate of cost, whereby those of 
limited means may have the opportunity to "make the cure." The past 
year we did over $3,200 worth of free work. 

As the various holidays come, recognition is made of them in some way. 
Easter is always such a blessed time. Through the interest of Rev. Arthur 
Ragatz and the American Bible Society, a copy of the Psalms was given 
to each patient on Easter morning. For a number of years the custom has 
been to present each patient with one of the Gospels at Eastertime. The 
small individual books are easy to handle and many have expressed their 
appreciation, telling of the good they have derived from God's Word, bring- 
ing to them his promises and love. Some have marked passages they 
have memorized. The ministers of the city are always generous with their 
services and time. The broadcast of church services means much to those 
who are shut in. 

On May Day an Albuquerque florist sent an abundance of lovely flowers, 
making it possible for each patient to have a beautiful bouquet. Through 
the year other florists and kind friends have been generous in contributing 
flowers for the "shut-ins." The Y.W.C.A. arranged motor trips and teas 
for those who were able to get out. This included all sanatoriums and so 
there was a bond of fellowship. 

There were several gifts presented to the Sanatorium during the past 
year, among them the glazing in of another porch. These additions mean 
so much to the comfort of the patients. 

Mrs. Gorrell says: "We have an interesting family and a happy, con- 
genial group to work with. It is a wonderful opportunity to sei've with 
added blessings and marvelous results of labor accomplished through the 
year." Our consecrated workers give through their ministry of love, 
patience, encouragement, much to the patients as they go about doing good. 
The first twenty-five years have been written into history, and we are well 
started on the next twenty-five years, hoping to be of greater service to 
those who need our care. 





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Mountainer 
Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee 

Mrs. Benjamin W. Meeks, Secretary 

131 West Second Street, Frederick, Maryland 

Ritler Hall 

Athens, Tennessee 
Mrs. Elizabeth Brubaker, Superintendent 



WiTUATED in a beautiful grove of trees, with attractive living rooms and 
broad porches, Ritter Hall provides a comfortable, homelike, and pleas- 
ing home for girls who attend Tennessee Wesleyan Junior College. Most 
of the students come from mountain homes, villages, or small towns. 

The work at Ritter is done on the co-operative plan. The cooking, the 
housekeeping, the planning of meals, and the setting of tables are all done 
by the girls, under the supervision and direction of the dietitian and the 
instructor of home economics. Each gii'l gives an hour each day to her 
allotted task, but the work is so arranged that there is no interference with 
college schedules. Thus a young woman may earn part of her tuition and 
at the same time learn the first principles of homemaking. 

Ritter takes good care of its girls — giving them a pleasant home, fine 
training to fit them for their place in the world, and in every way helping 
to develop those qualities that count most in the building of character. At 
the close of the evening meal a worship service is held. As each gii"l takes 
her turn as leader she receives personal instruction in the selection and 
pi"esentation of material. This means a definite training in worship and 
an appi'eciation of the best in music, art, and sacred literature. 

The Queen Esther Circle of Ritter has finished a successful year. They 
had sixty-four members, raised a modest appropriation, gave a thank offer- 
ing, and packed a Christmas box. 

Many girls would find it impossible to have two years of college if it 
were not for scholarships. One fine young woman, daughter of a Cum- 
berland Mountain farmer, struggled heroically to meet her expenses last 
year. This year she has been given a scholarship which she deeply appre- 
ciates. Her fine Christian character, her loyal, sincere nature, and her co- 
operative spirit are having their influence on her school life. Recently she 
was elected to a major office in a college organization. 

It is always a delight to assist the family of a minister. The work in these 
Southern mountain sections is so hard and the salaries are so small. The 
older daughter of a minister has just completed her two-year course and 
hopes to get a teaching position so that she might help her younger sister. 
Student aid meant everything to her. The same position in the library will 
be open to the young sister, but she must also have a scholarship in Ritter 
Hall. The father can give little assistance because he works early and late 
at odd jobs of paperhanging and painting, in between revival meetings and 
church services, endeavoring to earn a more adequate living for his large 
family. In the meantime we must do all that we can to help this younger 
sister to make her life happy and successful at Ritter Hall. 
Ritter Hall stands for 

R ight living 

I nspired sharing 

T rue devotion 

T rustful friendship 

E arnest service 

R eality of purpose 

H igh ideals 
A spiration 
L oyalty 
L aughter 




Rebecca McCleskey Hall 

Boaz, Alabama 

Mrs. F. A. Hendricks, 
Superintendent 



JJeBECCA McCLESKEY hall began in a little log- house with only one 
teacher, Mrs. Anna Elder. A larger frame house soon had to be built 
to accommodate the pupils who began to come from the vicinity of Sand 
Mountain, and it then became a project of The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. At first only elementary and 
primary grades were taught, but as the work grew high-school classes were 
added. From this small beginning has developed Snead Junior College of 
Boaz, Alabama, a project of the Board of Education of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, with McCleskey Hall, a project of The Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society, serving as a girls' dormitory. 

Snead College and McCleskey Hall co-operate closely in making a Chris- 
tian education possible for boys and girls of this section. They have been 
large factors in raising the standards of education in this mountain country. 
The number of grade schools has increased, and as roads have improved they 
have become more accessible. As high schools have been built the need for 
these classes was not so great, and Snead College has been able to give more 
attention to its Junior College courses. It is now a recognized Junior Col- 
lege, with as fine a student body as can be found in these United States. 
Such wholesome young men and women! Such a fine religious atmosphere! 
These young people have been given an opportunity to enlarge their lives, 
and they are making good use of it. 

By "workships" and by scholarships the students are able to get an edu- 
cation which would otherwise be impossible. They learn to do by doing 
and follow the co-operative plan. They sew, can, cook, clean, and wash 
under the supervision and direction of the college teacher of home economics 
and the dietitian. The home economics teacher conducts her classes at Mc- 
Cleskey Hall. The students help pay some of their tuition by these "work- 
ships." Woman's Home Missionary Society scholarships have given many 
a girl a chance for an education, thus enabling her to find her rightful place 
in the world. 

For thirty-four years McCleskey Hall has carried on this constructive 
type of work among girls, in co-operation with Snead College. Many of 
our girls have gone out as teachers, foreign missionaries, home missionary 
workers, deaconesses, dietitians, social service workers, and homemakers. 
Homes established by McCleskey girls are founded on fine Christian prin- 
ciples, and children of McCleskey girls are a credit to their parents and to 
their communities. 

Ethel Harpst, the superintendent of Harpst Home, received her early 
training here. Here she received the impetus that enabled her to carry 
through her wonderful projects in Cedartown, Georgia. 

In the fine Christian atmosphere of McCleskey Hall new ideals are formed, 
religious principles sti-engthened, ambitions aroused, and a desire to be of 
some use in the world becomes the absorbing interest of a girl's life. 

With the close of this fiscal year the Board of Education of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church took over the dormitory of McCleskey Hall. The new 
plan will bring both pi-ojects on the campus under the direction of one or- 
ganization. 

The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church is glad to have had a part in the development of this fine institution. 
Though it relinquishes its responsibility, the work still goes on, 

202 




Ethel Harpst Home 

Cedartown, Georgia 
Ethel Harpst, Superintendent 

JT IS impossible to appraise the good that has been accomplished by the 

Ethel Harpst Home during the years that it has been in existance. One 
of the greatest assets rests in its capacity to insure to hundreds of young 
people the happiness and success that they are entitled to in life. The Home 
stands as a monument to the woman for whom it was named. A great 
humanitarian, a woman who, recognizing her mission in life, continues to 
fulfill it with all of the zeal and enthusiasm at her command. Ethel Hai'pst 
has won her way into the hearts of her fellow citizens at Cedartown through 
her many acts of kindness and the work she has accomplished in caring 
for parentless children." 

These woi'ds are found in the "Story of Georgia," published by the 
American Historical Society. Harpst Home and its beloved founder and 
superintendent. Miss Ethel Harpst, are recognized not only in the State of 
Georgia, but are known throughout the land. 

This has been a busy, happy year at Harpst Home. The family has 
increased to 117 boys and girls, ranging from two years to high-school age. 
We always have a waiting list. One of the new members is two-year-old 
Janice, named by the children because she came in January. Poor mother- 
less babe! She had been living with neighbors. Her little body was covered 
with bruises and was so dirty! All of the little children wanted to share 
with her. Three-year-old Jane wanted to take off her own shoes to give 
them to the new baby girl. Of course the triplets — Isaac, Rachael, and 
Rebecca— are our pride and joy, too. They came into the Home when they 
were only two hours old; now at three years they are fine, healthy children. 

Each year brings some changes in our family. Lois, through the kind- 
ness of a friend in Cedartown, entered Asbury College, Wilmore, Kentucky. 
She has made an unusually good record. 

Two of our girls, Nina and Inez, were married. Wallace, who is now a 
minister at Dallas, Georgia, officiated at Nina's wedding. The Harpst Home 
girls' chorus furnished the music. All of the wedding party, \yith the ex- 
ception of the groom and best man, were members of our family. 

Pansy Waddell finished her internship in dietetics at the Walter Reed 
Hospital in Washington, D. C. She was immediately retained at the hospital 
as dietitian, an honor given only to those who rank highest in the class. 

Someone has said, "There is gold in them thar hills." There is certainly 
great musical talent in these boys and girls from the mountain districts. 
They love to sing and respond readily to instruction on the piano and violin. 
This year we have both junior and senior choirs. The Troy Conference 
made robes for both choirs and they took part in the Easter service at the 
mission church. There is a rhythm band of fifty-five pieces. We are start- 
ing an orchestra and hope sqme day to have a band as well. 




204 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

The children receive training: in household arts and practical nursing 
under ti-ained supervisors. They are well able to take their places in the 
world when they complete their school course and leave the Home. Each 
child receives personal counsel and guidance in selecting a lifework. 

Catherine and Edith came home from college this year to help at Harpst 
Home. Catherine has been appointed girls' matron and Edith holds the 
position of dietitian. We are proud of these girls and also of Victoria Perry, 
who has been a valued member of the staff for the past five years. 

One of our boys, Floyd, who graduated from high school last year, 
has been taking care of Surrey Farm since January. He has done fine 
work and has been most dependable. He and the eighteen boys who live 
on the farm have harvested the best crop this year that we have ever had. 
We are so thankful for the vegetables and milk that they have brought us 
each day for our large family. The girls have been very busy canning the 
surplus vegetables. In the fall syi-up was made and the cotton picked by 
the boys. 

The boys are so proud of their farmhouse, which was dedicated in De- 
cember. This lovely new home was the gift of the Junior Department 
of The Woman's Home Missionary Society and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Pfeiffer, 
of New York. 

Harpst Home continues to grow. An administration building, with 
dormitoi'y combined and a home for the superintendent, is now in the process 
of building, gifts of our good friends, Mr. and Mrs. Pfeiflfer. 

A revival was held at the mission church this summer. A number of 
our children, including many of the older ones, found a definite Christian 
experience. It is a joy to see their happy faces and to hear them pray. 
Some of the older ones are beginning to plan for their lifework. In a few 
years, if opportunity is given these children for further study, they will 
take their places in the world as Christian doctors, nurses, teachers, me- 
chanics, or as preachers, deaconesses, and missionaries. 

We are glad to bring joy and happiness to our mountain boys and girls, 
to help them to know Jesus Christ as their Saviour, and to prepare them 
to take their places in the world as Christain citizens. 




Deborah McCarty Settlement House 

Cedartown, Georgia 
Ethel Harpst, Superintendent 

]y[cCARTY SETTLEMENT HOUSE continues to make its impress upon 
the town life of Cedartown, Georgia. The workers conduct a supervised 
playground, hold boys' clubs, mothers' clubs, Epworth League meetings, and 
various other activities. Sunday services are conducted regularly and a 
Daily Vacation Bible School is held each year. This season the enrollment 
was sixty-eight. McCarty kindergarten meets a great need in the Cedar- 
town community. It is difficult to conjecture the influences for good that 
this work and the woi-kers are having on the lives of all in the vicinity of 
McCarty Settlement House. 




Mountaineer 
Kentucky, Mississippi and North Carolina 

Mrs. H. S. Osborn, Secretary 

208 S. Hill Terrace, Ithaca, New York 

Pfeiffer Junior College 

Misenheimer, North Carolina 
W. S. Sharp, President 

Pfeiffer junior college, located on Federal Hig-hway No. 52, 

between Salisbury and Albemarle, has just completed its fourth year 
as a fully recognized Junior College in the state of North Carolina. To 
the two girls' dormitories, one boys' dormitory, central building, and presi- 
dent's home, which were erected a few years ago, and the remodeled ad- 
ministration building, has been added this past year Jane Freeman Hall, 
in which may be found a beautiful library, laboratories for commercial 
classes and for all the sciences, including domestic science, two recitation 
rooms, two suites for faculty families, and dormitory space for twenty-eight 
additional boys. This fine building, which was the gift of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Pfeiffer, of New York, is fully equipped to make it of the most 
service, and additional courses in the sciences are now being included in the 
curriculum of the college. New books are added to the library each year 
to make the teaching of all subjects more effective. 

Adjoining the campus is a farm of 230 acres which produces milk, meat, 
eggs, and vegetables for use in the dining room, and where fruit trees 
give promise of early yields of peaches, apples, and cherries. Young men 
students whose special interest is in agriculture have ample opportunity 
to increase their knowledge and skill in work on the farm. A pure-bred 
herd of Holstein cows, a fiock of white Leghorn chickens, and hogs enough 
to furnish pork and to consume table scraps, stock the farm. 

The College is affiliated with the State Athletic Association in basket- 
ball, baseball, track and field events, and the boys played through the sea- 
son in these games, while the girls took part in intra-mural sports of vari- 
ous kinds. An effort is made to give all the students the benefit of train- 
ing in physical activities. One of the rooms in Goode Hall has been fur- 
nished as a recreation room to be used by students in leisure-time activi- 
ties, and various social events mark the passing of the school year. There 
are clubs for various types of work and play, and a movie outfit gives 
weekly or bi-weekly entertainments on the campus. A portable projector 
for use in classrooms will greatly enhance the presentation of various sub- 
jects. 

Religion receives its due share of attention, and the desire of the 
administration is that young people committed to the care of the institution 
may acquire an all-round development that will fit them for serviceable 
Christian lives. More and more it is possible to select students who rank 
well in their high schools, and who come to college with serious purposes 
to make themselves useful to their day and generation. The high quality 
of the rank and file of Pfeiffer students is an encouragement to those who 
in person or by their contributions share in their development. 



Jane Freeman Hall 





Wood Junior College 

Mathiston, Mississippi 
Jasper Weber, President 



T^^HE past year at Wood Junior College has been a very busy and satis- 
factory year for everyone in every way. 

During the latter part of the summer a great amount of remodeling was 
done to the buildings. The first floor of old Dickson Hall was remodeled 
so as to make classi'ooms for the home economics, music, history, educa- 
tion, agriculture, industrial arts, and modern language departments, be- 
sides a general club room. 

Complete new equipment was secured for the home economics depart- 
ment, bringing it up to standard. The rooms in the administration building, 
now known as Bennett Hall, were changed and enlarged so as to give more 
facilities for the library and laboratories. New equipment was installed 
in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory, and the lighting systems in both 
buildings were modernized. The wails and woodwork were all repainted. 

Mr. Gerhard E. Roe, a graduate of Stout Institute, was secured to 
organize the work in Industrial Arts, Woodwork, and Farm Mechanics. 
We had no shop or equipment for this work, but with the help of the students 
Mr. Roe built a shop and made benches and tool cabinets for his depart- 
ment. After these classes were organized, the young men did some un- 
usually fine cabinet work, making furniture for their ovm homes. 

At the opening of school every available room was filled in both Miller 
Hall and Wood Hall, and to avoid sending students home, we put a num- 
ber of young men in old Dickson Hall. 

The spiritual life of the students was greatly strengthened by the 
work of Rev. Guy J. Fansher, district superintendent of the Burlington 
District of the lowa-Des Moines Conference, who came to us for a week 
of special meetings the latter part of January. Then, the latter part of 
March, our students had the pleasure of enjoying a three-day visit from 
"Dad Elliott," nationally noted Y.M.C.A. leader. 

The music department, under Mr. Brooks Haynes, has done most ex- 
cellent work this year, the glee club winning special notice for the excellent 
programs given in a number of neighboring tovsms during the Christmas 
season. They were very highly complimented everywhere they appeared. 

One student who graduated this past year is the last of three from one 
family to finish. Her aunt completed the two-years' college work several 
years ago, having worked for practically all her expenses except a small 
amount which she was able to borrow from friends. She secured work as a 
teacher in the public schools, intending to pay back the money she had 
borrowed and help her two nieces with their college expenses. Serious 
illness of other members of the family made it necessary for her to assume 
the payment of heavy doctor bills and other expenses which would have 
discouraged many persons with much larger incomes, but the three have 
worked and saved and skimped until at last they have won their fight. 
This summer will see all school bills paid and all three ready to render 
eflfective service in their chosen fields. 

Another girl writes asking for more work this coming year, saying: 
"My mother is a widow with smaller children to support and send to school. 
She is trying to make a living by working a small farm which she rents. 
She had three cows, but sold one to pay my tuition last year. She has 
nothing to sell this year, and I do not see how I can come without more 
work." She is one of our finest and most dependable students. 



Above : 
^ Hannah Pennock Miller Hall 

'^^ lit 





Erie School, Aiken Hall, 

and Walker Neighborhood 

House 

Olive Hill, Kentucky 

Frances Harms, Superintendent 



/i LTHOUGH the educational system in the mountain sections shows im- 
provement, the need of such an institution as Erie School is still very 
great. Fine young people, often unfortunately located as far as fifteen 
miles fi'om high school, continue to look to us for help, and each year finds 
many new students enrolling. 

Picture, if you can, a girl standing at the gate of her simple mountain 
home anxiously awaiting the arrival of a man on horseback who carries 
the mail over the steep, stony roads. She has been waiting for days for a 
letter which will tell her whether or not she may enter Erie School, We 
have been able to say "yes" to seventy boarding girls and over one hundred 
day students. So few are able to pay their expenses, but when scholarships 
have not been available, the N.Y.A. has been of great benefit. During 
a recent conversation a mother said, "We used to be able to get a little 
money by taking vegetables to town and selling them, but since the hard 
road has been built, a truck with its big fresh load gets into town long 
before we can, and by the time we get there our vegetables are jolted 
so much no one wants them." 

Each year many boys are asking for admittance to high school. Lack- 
ing a dormitory, this year we cared for a few boys in the living quarters 
at Walker Neighborhood House. While this was not ideal, it did give 
these few an opportunity such as we are affording the girls, and it proves 
the great need of a home for boys. 

We have many activities outside of the school program. The mountain 
children often lack the desire to play, and we are trying to create a love 
for clean sports. During favorable seasons contests in outdoor games are 
sponsored, and much is being accomplished along this line. 

The Walker Memorial Neighborhood House is proving of great benefit 
to the community. Through its religious and social programs young people 
and children of the community are being uplifted. The Boy Scout troop 
is one of the finest in this part of the state. The game room and library 
are very popular places. A well-equipped clinic room is open to the county 
health doctor who, with the assistance of our nurse, holds clinics for 
mothers at stated times. It is also used by the nurse, who is constantly 
being called upon to help families where they are financially unable to 
secure medical aid. 

Our gi'aduates, if at all possible, enter college, and it is most gratify- 
ing to hear of statements such as were made by a college president, who 
said that Erie School graduates were among his very best students, and he 
was always glad to have them. 

We have graduated two lovely girls from one family, and now have the 
third. Recently one of them wrote: "Surely there must be some special 
work for our family to do or the Lord would not have placed his hand 
on us and brought us out of the hills to Erie School." 



Above: Aiken Hall 
Erie School 



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208 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Negro 

Mrs. Anna L. Zook, Secretary 

1201 State Street, Larned, Kansas 

J)R. THOMAS JESSE JONES, Educational Director of the Phelps-Stokes 
Fund, in an address at Hampton Institute, sometime ago, said: "Negro 
education (although showing gratifying results and reassuring progress) 
is decidedly behind white education in almost every respect. Almost a 
million Negro children are still out of school, yet Negro education has 
advanced rapidly, due to five factors: (a) The general progress of educa- 
tion in America, (b) The determination of Negroes themselves to acquire 
education, causing them to give out of their poverty with impressive lib- 
erality, (c) The ever-expansive expenditure in federal, state, county, and 
municipal governments, (d) The continuing contributions of churches and 
church boards of education, (e) The efforts and expenditures of philan- 
thropic and educational foundations whose services have been unequalled 
in Negro education because of their careful study of the problems, and the 
co-operation they have enlisted in the districts they have helped. Examples 
of these are the Rockefeller Foundation, the Rosenwald Fund, the Phelps- 
Stokes Fund, and the Jeanes Fund." 

During the fifty-eight years of its history. The Woman's Home Mission- 
ary Society has marched side by side with these other agencies, and today 
its Bureau for Negro Work is making a worth-while contribution to the 
advancement of Negro education. We gladly bring you this report of the 
year's work in the bureau. 



Boylan-Haven School 

Jesse and Franklin Streets, Jacksonville, Florida 
A. Jeannette Lehman, Superintendent 

A FTER an absence of eight years from the city of Jacksonville, it was 

a real joy to the bureau secretary to be permitted to visit Boylan once 
more, to note the changes and improvements that have been made, and to 
be associated in the work again with Miss Lehman and her staff. 

Boylan-Haven now houses a group of fifty girls, with perhaps one hun- 
dred others coming as day pupils. The students are offered a thorough 
junior high and senior high-school course, with classes in home economics 
and music, under well-trained instructors. The classes in voice and the 
piano show careful training. 

The school cafeteria is proving a real benefit, and is managed by the 
foods teacher. 

At the close of school a Daily Vacation Bible School was opened, with 
three of our staff members and seven students as instructors. More than 
two hundred boys and girls thronged to the doors to avail themselves of 
this opportunity. The attendance did not lag throughout the three-weeks' 
period, and we feel that the enterprise was well worth while. 

The first time this bureau secretary visited Boylan she was attracted 
toward a tiny tot in the first grade who was very proud of her school. 
Little Amelia was never forgotten by her through the years. Last May 
she was privileged to again meet Amelia as an outstanding member of 
the senior class — a Boylan girl from first grade to high-school senior. 

Another girl who was a high-school freshman at the time of that first 
visit is now a valued member of the Boylan-Haven teaching staff. Serv- 
ice for others seems to be the ideal at Boylan-Haven. 



Boylan-Haven School 




Bureaus. 



209 



Browning Home and Mather Academy 

Camden, South Cai'olina 
Clara F. Sykes, Superintendent 




'T'HE last to be named and the largest in point of nmnbers in the bureau 

family is Browning Home and Mather Academy. 

Just after these schools in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida 
were given over to her care, the bureau secretary's heart was made to 
turn over with fright by receiving the resignation of the superintendent, 
Miss Millicent Fuller, who had given several years of fine service to the 
institution. 

The story of Browning, as written by a former bureau secretary, is 
most interesting. From it we learn that a school for Negroes was opened 
in Camden before there was a Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. The "old Southern mansion" is now our dor- 
mitory for boys, in which we house a group of about twenty-five boys and 
the men who are on our staff. The eighteen acres which were purchased 
with the "mansion'' now constitute our "farm" and our athletic grounds. 

Like Mr. Phinney's turnip, "it grew and grew" after being taken over 
by our Society. We now have a splendid dormitory for girls, in which is 
included a dining room, kitchen, store room and laundry, a well-equipped 
home economics department, music department, gymnasium, and chapel 
or auditorium. The school building cares for all the grades and a full four- 
year high school. 

Mather Academy is one of the few high schools in the state accredited 
by the Southern Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges. The staff 
numbers twenty-three members, all of whom hold degrees from accredited 
colleges. 

In addition to the home economics, music, athletics, high school, and 
grades, we have a well-organized department of industrial arts, which we 
are confident is going to meet a real need in our work. 

Under the director of religious education, many young people have 
taken advanced steps in Christian experience. There are many organiza- 
tions on the campus which foster the active Christian life. Girl Reserves. 
Hi-Y, Queen Esthers and Home Guards, church school, prayer meetings, 
and regular church services keep young minds active. 




Allen Home School 

331 College Street, 
Asheville, North Carolina 

Carmen Lowry, Superintendent 



TOURING the years since it was established in 1887, Allen has stood for 
all that is highest and best in education and home training. For a 
number of years it was in advance of the public schools in the State. In more 
recent years it has kept pace with the rapid development of the public 
school system of North Carolina, and today it stands as a state accredited 
high school whose chief aim is to provide Christian education and high- 
school opportunities for worthy girls who live in communities where there 
are no such schools. 

Allen is the only school in western North Carolina in which teacher 
training is given. Our teacher is splendidly equipped for this work. The 
course is prepared by the State Director, and the class meets on Saturdays. 

Negro physicians and lawyers are asking us to train office girls for 
them. To meet this need, students who are superior in scholarship are 
permitted to take typing and shorthand in addition to regular subjects. 

In harmony with the policies of our Society, the lower grades are being 
gradually eliminated. This year we have no classes below the fifth. How- 
ever, the grade school is crowded to capacity. 

Our schoolrooms accommodate about one hundred and fifty students, 
and in the boarding department forty-five or more girls. 

Classes in home economies and in music are under competent instruc- 
tors. The department of religious education is supervised by Miss Anna 
Scudder, who is well qualified for such work. 

Miss Carmen Lowry is the new superintendent of Allen this year, after 
nine years of splendid work as principal of the school. Her experience 
and her interest in the work assure her of success. 

Miss Julia Titus, after eight years as a successful teacher in the bureau, 
succeeds Miss Lowry as school principal. 

Tliayer Hall 

Clark Campus, South Atlanta, Georgia 
Mrs. Winifred Myser Smith, Superintendent and Dean of Women 

In KEEPING with its policy of helping young women to prepare for the 
many activities of life after college, Thayer has gone steadily forward 
with a group of nearly seventy young women in the home. The year passed 
quietly, with nothing out of the ordinary happening, and we are grateful 
for His guidance and abundant blessings. 

The home economics department, under Miss Mildred Kenyon and Mrs. 
Arra B. Robinson, has done good work. We appreciated the visit in May 
of Dr. Flemmie Kittrell, who made an extensive survey of the department, 
after which many valuable suggestions were made to the teachers and the 
committee on courses of study. Our aim is to meet all requirements, and 
to offer to our students the very best in home economics training. 

Another visit fraught with interest and benefit to the entire student 
group was that of Dr. Rollin H. Walker, whose spiritual messages were 
an inspiration to all. 

Miss Grace Steiner was our honored guest during the week of her lec- 
tures to the students in Gammon Seminary. 

Each Thayer Hall girl is a dues-paying member of the Queen Esther 
Circle. Interesting meetings, with study and social hour, keep alive the 
missionary interest of these young women. 

The activities on the campus are many and varied. The beautiful Sun- 
day afternoon vesper service, the Bible class, the student prayer meetings, 
Student Volunteer meetings, Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. with many social 
affairs, make the life here one of activity, in all of which there is a 
beautiful spirit of comradeship. 

210 



Thayer Hall 




We closed the year with enough funds to make some repairs and to 
give our building a much-needed coat of paint. 

The third year of work in the Woman's Department at Gammon School 
has proved beyond question the wisdom of this undertaking. The number 
taking the work was the largest that had been enrolled. The two young 
women who completed the course a year ago are now doing acceptable work 
under Boards in our church, and we are sui-e other students will find 
places in which to serve. Miss Arnold is making a fine contribution to the 
work at Gammon. 

Eliza Dee Hall 

1203 East Avenue, Austin, Texas 
Vievie M. Souders, Superintendent 

P]LIZA dee is one of the four institutions in the bureau co-operating 
with the Board of Education. Beautiful for situation, on a hill over- 
looking the city and the Capitol grounds, it is a place of which we may 
well be proud. 

Thirty-nine freshmen college young women became residents of Eliza 
Dee Hall last September. These, with the sophomores, juniors, and seniors, 
who had been living in the Hall in pi'evious years, filled the building to 
capacity. 

Excellent work was done along all lines. The home economics depai't- 
ment, under Mrs. McKeoun and Miss Keith, had an unusually good year. 
During the summer the house was filled with summer school students, 
many of whom were enrolled in the home economics classes. Each year we 
are adding to our equipment and to our library in compliance with state 
I'equirements. 

The Queen Esther Circle, sponsored by Miss Ford, enjoyed the study 
coui'se and held most interesting meetings each month. Every girl in the 
home was a member, with dues paid in September. A contribution was 
also made to the Queen Esther Special, and again the girls had the joy 
of helping a Sager-Brown girl. 

The workers, without exception, have given themselves unstintedly 
in directing and inspiring the lai'ger and more vital interests in the lives 
of these young women. "Religion in everyday living" has been the ideal 
of each staff member. Daily devotions, in which the students have taken 
an active part, mission study, church school, Epworth League, as well as 
social activities, aid in developing this ideal in the lives of our girls. 

Realizing that our young women will be expected to assume responsi- 
bility in religious leadership, after leaving school, they are encouraged 
to participate in the activities of the local church, as far as possible, while 
in school. 



Eliza nee Hall 




212 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



E. L. Rust Hall 

Holly Sprin8:s, Mississippi 
Elfleda Myser, Superintendent 

p]lGHTY-EIGHT young women and girls of college and high-school ages 
have lived in the two dormitories at Rust the past year, all of whom 
were under the direct supervision of our superintendent, Miss Myser. 

Christian ideals and lofty pui-poses have been maintained at all times. 
The morale of the group has been unusually good, and a fine sense of 
worth and loyalty has been manifested in the hearty support of the pro- 
gram of the institution. 

Church school, the Sabbath vesper sei'vice, the Epworth League, Queen 
Esther Circle, the Y.W.C.A., weekly prayer meetings for students and fac- 
ulty, prayer groups conducted by the students, all have contributed to the 
beautiful Christian atmosphere to which we have aspii'ed. 




One of the outstanding events of the year was the visit of Dr. RoUin 
H. Walker during Religious Emphasis Week. The student group had looked 
eagerly forward to and had planned carefully for this visit of Dr. Walker's, 
which made a rich contribution to the spiritual life of the campus. 

One of the greatest needs in the deep South today is for well-trained 
elementary teachers. Rust is the only institution (with the exception of 
Oklahoma Junior College) which is offering such training in this northern 
section. The State Department of Education gives credit for the excel- 
lent work done in this line. 

This year, for the first time. Rust is able to offer a college major in 
home economics. The oldest building on the college campus, an old brick 
building that has been used as a laundry, is being converted into an attrac- 
tive practice house, and a number of our young women will major in 
home economics. The home economics club is open to all students who 
are in the home economics classes, and aims to develop an appreciation 
for home economics through group discussions and individual expx-ession. 

Two of our recent graduates are teaching in institutions of the Society 
this year. 



Bureaus. 



213 




Peck Hall and Gilbert Academy 

5323 Pitt Sti'eet, New Orleans, Louisiana 
Mrs. D. M. McDonald. Superintendent 
Mrs. Margaret Davis Bowen, Principal 

"P ECK, the fourth of our institutions in the co-operative program, pro- 
vides a. home for the out-of-town girls who attend high school at Gilbert 
Academy, and a place of residence for three of the workers from Faith 
Community Center. 

Twenty-five girls found a home in Peck last year. These girls came 
from towns and villages where no high schools are provided for Negro 
youth. Had it not been for our institution, these girls would have been 
obliged to stop with only a seventh-grade education. Some of them could 
not have come to us at all, had it not been for the help given through 
scholarships. 

Two of the graduates of last June have secured employment by which 
they expect to earn their expenses in college. They are splendid girls, and 
we expect them to make good. 

Practically three hundred boys and girls are enrolled in Gilbert Academy, 
where excellent work is being done. It is an inspiration to sit in chapel 
and study this eager group of young people, all of whom are alive to the 
opportunity that is theirs. 

The Queen Esthers had a successful year, with each girl a member 
and dues paid. The meetings are most interesting. The evening service 
of prayer, which lasts only a few minutes, is a time of inspiration to all 
in the home. Our young people find many opportunities to serve in the 
local churches, and are rendering acceptable service. 

The home life is beautiful. Mrs. McDonald, who is so well known and 
loved by the people of Louisiana, has endeared herself to her girls. The 
quiet little conferences with them, singly or in groups, have proved most 
profitable, and they respond enthusiastically to every suggestion or effort 
that is made to help them. 




214 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Sager-Brown Home 

Baldwin, Louisiana 
Agnes M. Little, Superintendent 

^Y E ARE grlad to report a splendid year at Sager-Brown, with the Home 
entirely free from debt, all bills paid to date, and a comfortable bal- 
ance with which to open the new year. 

^Pifty boys and girls were cared for in our two buildings during the 
past year. A few of the older ones have gone out, but as they go others 
come in to take their places. From baby David, aged three, and Avalon, 
four, up to boys and girls of teen ages, we have a happy, healthy, well- 
balanced group of children who are grateful for what Sager-Brown has 
done for them. 

Last year, for the first time, we had a teacher of music. Miss Gwen- 
dolyn Gilkes. With her fine ability in music, both piano and violin, the 
boys and girls are developing talent along musical lines. Miss Gilkes 
also teaches drawing and some other subjects. The gift of a very fine 
violin from a friend in Oklahoma Conference has helped much in the work 
of our music department. 




Several years ago all school work above the seventh grade was dropped. 
This meant that many village children who had come to us as day pupils 
could not have school privileges beyond that grade. Two years ago we 
resumed eighth-grade work. This year, with the addition of one more 
teacher. Miss Carrie Patillo, a Rust graduate, we are adding the ninth 
grade. Thus we now have a Junior High School. The village and com- 
munity people greatly appreciate this step on our part. 

Miss Gladys Crawford came a year ago as school principal. She entered 
into the work with enthusiasm, and we feel that much is being accom- 
plis^hed. 

In March and April Miss Little went on one of the Society's mission- 
ary journeys, visited Nebraska and Dakota, and made many friends for 
Sager-Brown. 

Once again, we ask you to visit Sager-Brown. We shall try to make 
you comfortable, and assure you a royal welcome from one and all. 



Bureaus. 



215 




Faith Conimunity Center 

526 South Claiborne Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana 
Eva M. Callaway, Superintendent 

^HE year at Faith has been one in which ligrhts and shadows have inter- 
mingled. During the year Miss Beulah Hill was obliged to give up her 
work for reasons of health. By doubling up, and by using local helpers, 
we were able to get through the year without sending another person to 
take her place. Then, during her vacation pei'iod. Miss Callaway, the su- 
perintendent, underwent a very serious opei^ation. 

In face of handicaps, however, excellent work has been done. The 
kindergarten and the nursery school have been well attended. Clubs and 
classes of various kinds have met at intervals. Library night was popular, 
and boys and girls were glad for the chance to come to the Center. 

Our Boy Scouts are rated as the finest Negro Scout Troop in the city. 
Their camping trip in the summer was the first experience of some of the 
boys in being out of the city. 

The home-makers class and the boys' cai'pentering class have done fine 
work. 

Queen Esthers, Home Guards, and Mothers' Jewels have held meetings 
regularly. 

Although our playground is very, very small, it is surprising the num- 
ber of children who find their way to it. Supervised play has meant much 
to these underprivileged children. The boys and girls have enjoyed to see 
things grow, and our little yard has been a bower of beauty. 

Christmas boxes and the many tokens of remembrance that have come 
during the year are greatly appreciated. 



Italian Kindergarten and Nursery School 

Esplanade Avenue and Chartres Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 
Mrs. Hazel Palmisano, Superintendent 

fi^OR reasons of economy in administration, the Italian Kindergarten and 
Nursery School has, for a number of years, been a part of this bureau. 
Here the work has been along the same lines as in other years, kinder- 
garten and nursery school, afternoon classes, home visiting, visits to the 
hospital, to the sick and the shut-ins. 

Our superintendent is welcomed everywhei'e, not only by the church 
people, but by the parents of these foreign children whose only contact 
with Protestantism, perhaps, is through the kindergarten. 

During the year the mayor of the city became interested in our work 
enough to come to visit the kindergarten. He was well pleased with the 
program being carried on, and expressed a desire to help. As a result of 



216 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



his interest, a number of material improvements have been made which 
help in making our work more effective. 

Every school day morning children from two to five years old come 
flocking to the kindergarten. They love to come, for here they find a 
bright, sunny room, playtime, and play space — with toys, games, and com- 
panionship. They love the class work, too, and nothing makes them happier 
when visitors come than to sing their songs, recite Bible verses, listen 
to the stories told by "Miss Hazel," as they call the superintendent. 

Mothers who work are glad of the privilege of bringing their little 
ones to us, for they know they will receive loving, tender care. 

Little Marie's mother was moving from one tenement to another. As 
they walked down a long dark hallway in the new place of abode, the 
tiny tot slipped her hand into her mother's and said, "It is dark, but I am 
not afraid, for Miss Hazel tells us what time I am afraid I will trilst in God." 




When we come to the end of a year's work and try to sum it all up in 
a report, we are overwhelmed. Some things, no doubt, have been accom- 
plished which could not be summarized in a formal report, and yet they 
have been vital and far-reaching. Some things have been done that should 
not have been done at all. But we remember that He who sees the end 
from the beginning takes care of our mistakes and overlooks our short- 
comings. How many things there are that we should have done, that we 
really intended to do, yet somehow have been left undone. So as we face 
the new year, we recall a little poem by Anna B. Bi-yant, the last lines 
of which are: 

"Heart o' mine, listen! 
Why will yo' fret? 
Dar's a whol' day t'morrow 
That ain't teched yet!" 




Joint Administration With Board 
of Education 



Bennett College 

Greensboro, North Carolina 
David D. Jones, President 

^ENNETT COLLEGE, situated on a forty-acre campus, beautiful in its 
dignified and imposing atmosphere, has been a pioneer in the twelve 
years that it has existed as an institution of higher learning exclusively 
for young Negro women. Being one of only two such colleges in the coun- 
try, it has worked out a unique program based on the highest spiritual and 
intellectual values, not losing sight of the importance of the physical de- 
velopment of its students. 

With an enrollment of approximately 325 students, Bennett College seeks 
to give individualized training to every student and to surround each with 
wholesome and inspiring influences. It is believed at Bennett that every- 
thing that touches the life of the student is educative, and so all of the 
activities at Bennett College are carefully planned with the idea of its 
value in student development. 

Since Bennett College is an institution for young women, home eco- 
nomics has been of major importance in its educational ideals. The home- 
making institute, held annually since the spring of 1927, has been a tangible 
means of setting before the student body and the community at large the 
importance of all phases of right living. Through its home-making institute, 
Bennett has sought to show the close parallel between the home and the 
community. In recognition of the work that Bennett College has done 
through its home economics department, the General Education Board of 
New York City has recently made a grant for the establishment and main- 
tenance for three years of a Nursery-School-Parent Education Center, which 
was inaugurated this fall with accommodations for twelve children. 

In Api'il, 1938, the Annie Merner Hall, a dormitory for sophomores, 
constructed and equipped at a cost of $100,000, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Pfeiffer, of New York City, was dedicated. The building houses about 
sixty-five young women, and is one of the most beautiful structures on the 
campus. The new $100,000 Thomas F. Holgate Library, now under con- 
struction, the gift of the General Education Board, has been endowed with 
a like sum by Mr. and Mrs. Pfeifl'er. This endowment brings the total of 
these benefactors' gifts to Bennett College to $447,000. Bennett College 
is deeply appreciative of the continued support of Mr. and Mrs. Pfeiffer, 
the General Education Board, The Woman's Home Missionary Society, the 
Board of Education, and other intei-ested friends, without whose help it 
could not exist. 

The success of a college is measured in terms of the accomplishments 
of its graduates. Bennett's graduates are taking their places in teaching 
and other professions, as Christian home-makers, and many have gone 
on for further study. Miss Virginia Simmons, who graduated from Ben- 
nett in 1934 with honors, and who holds the Master's degree from the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, is this year studying at the University of Paris on a 
fellowship granted her by the Institute of International Education. A large 
number of Bennett girls are now teaching in institutions which are under 
The Woman's Home Missionary Society, and good reports of their labors 
are often heard. It is particularly gratifying that many of the young women, 
through sacrifice and self-denial, have sent their sisters and other girls back 
to Bennett in order that they, too, might have a chance. 



The Henry Pfeiffer 
Science Hall 



Hi H H 
- y y U 




.flfLaa 



mm m fi*^3r!^ m m a ai §13 ^ 



218 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Puerto Rico and New York 

Mrs. Raymond Meek, Secretary 

17 Cotswold Way, Scarsdale, New York 



Alma Mathews House 

273 W. 11th Street, New York, New York 
Maurine Paas, Director 




T^HE Alma Mathews House is a co-operative home for business and pro- 
fessional women of the lower salaried group. During the past year 
the House has been full all the time, and most of the time there has been 
a waiting list. We often wish that our House could hold twice our capacity 
of twenty, yet if we could stretch its wall, it would no doubt lose some 
of the homelike atmosphere which is its charm. This size group makes it 
possible for Alma Mathews House to be one large family. Sympathetic 
understanding of each other's trials, kindness, and a helping hand when 
•'luck is down" are to be found here. In a metropolis where people seem 
to be so indifferent, this interest and understanding are rare and greatly 
valued by those who have experienced the loneliness of a big city. 

After a girl has been in residence for three years or is over the age 
limit, thirty yearsj she is supposed to be on her feet sufficiently to be able 
to afford to live elsewhere. Our rates are the most reasonable of any 
women's residence in the city. Here a girl may have a room for $2.50 per 
week. She may co-operate with the other girls in the planning and prepa- 
ration of the evening dinner. Girls take turns in groups of twos. The 
same two who plan the meal, prepare it, and wash up. The assistant direc- 
tor, who is usually a home economics student, does the buying and helps 
in the planning. By this method a wholesome meal can be had for about 
thirty cents per meal. This varies with the commodity prices, of course. 

It is around the dinner table at the end of a busy day that one sees 
the girls relax under the soft glow of candlelight. Here the news of the 
day is discussed, each giii bringing her viewpoint in the light of her back- 
ground. Over a period of time hai'dly a subject escapes discussion, vary- 
ing from crime to religion. 

Over this family the director. Miss Paas, presides. She holds a Mas- 
ter's degree in religious education; she is young and progressive in view- 
point, and therefore has much in common with this group of girls. As 
they approach her with their problems, the girls are sure of a sympathetic 
listener. She is a modern among them, but one with a Christian viewpoint. 

The social life of the House is varied, as it depends largely on the 
desires of the group in residence. Sometimes there is a social time just 
for the House girls; sometimes the "boy friends'' are included. Still other 
occasions include an important dinner guest. The House has a rotating 
committee which takes upon itself some of these functions, as well as some 
of the House pi-oblems which, of course, arise when any group of people 
live together. What rules there are, are generally self-imposed. 




Geo. O. Robinson School 

P. O. Box 966, San Juan, Puerto Rico 
Mrs. Estella S. Howard, Superintendent 

JTROM small beginnings in a rented house in Puerto Rico, Geo. O. Robinson 
School has grown until we now accommodate in our own building about 
seventy-five children. To these children we give elementary schooling and 
the fundamentals of homemaking, but above all we try to give them a vision 
of the true Christian Way of Life. The school situation in Puerto Rico is 
still acute, in that less than half of the children of school age have school 
facilities. The department of education has never been able to provide 
enough schools for the children. Even now, when so many schools have 
been built with the Puerto Rican Reconstruction Administration money, the 
schooling available to children of Puerto Rico is far below the actual need. 
To Geo. 0. Robinson School come childi'en in whose lives there has been 
some sort of tragedy usually. They may be full orphans; they may be half 
orphans where the remaining pai'ent finds it impossible to both work and 
establish a home. They may come from broken homes. This latter occur- 
rance seems increasingly the cause of their coming to Geo. 0. Robinson, 
even in this so-called Catholic country where divoi-ce is contrary to the 
established religion. Because of the emotional and psychological strain to 
which most of our girls have been subjected before they come to us, there 
is frequently a different adjustment to be made. This kind of re-education 
is very important to their happiness in later life, and is far more difficult 
than the acquisition of the three R's. Then, too, many are not well phys- 
ically. By this it is not to be inferred that we admit ill childi-en, for each 
one must have a thorough physical examination before being admitted, but 
very many have either not had the proper diet for their best development 
or have not had enough to eat. With the correction of a well-balanced diet 
these children improve mentally and physically. Under the watchful eye 
of a trained dietitian, their weight and gain are closely checked. 

This year we are fortunate in obtaining the services of a well-trained 
young woman in physical education who, through sports and games, will 
strive not only to improve the physical development of our children, but to 
build character through developing good sportsmanship. Eminent psy- 
chologists claim that games are the best method known for developing good 
personalities. 

Because of the lack of sufficient number of schools in Puerto Rico, and 
because of the great need of just such a home as ours, we ai-e filled to over- 
flowing all the time. Indeed, Mrs. E. S. Howard, our able superintendent, 
turns away more than we are able to take. This past winter Mrs. W. H. C. 
Goode, President; Mrs. W. R. Brown, Vice-President, and Mrs. J. H. Free- 
man, Treasurer, visited this work. They were impressed by the acute need 
for expansion to try to meet the need pressing upon us all the time. In 
answer to the need there has been initiated the Sixtieth Anniversary Building 
Plan for Geo. 0. Robinson. This building will give to us dormitory space 

219 



220 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

for about sixty more g'irls, and much-needed classrooms. Because of the 
deterioration of one of our small building's, the Yates Cottage, caused by the 
termites, we have scarcely enough classroom in which to hold school. Classes 
are held in the library, on the porch and balconies, and even in our precious 
Woodruff Chapel. 

Courageous women began this work in 1902. Surely the women of 1938 
and 1939 will be no less courageous in meeting the growing need! 

Puerto Rican Kindergartens 
Miss Bernice Huff, Director 

As THE visiting committee (Mrs. Goode, Mrs. Brown, and Mrs. Freeman) 
went about Fuerto Rico last winter, one of the most frequent remarks 
was: "Oh, the children on the road! The children are everywhere!" It 
was partly in answer to this need of caring for little children that the kin- 
dergartens were established many years ago. There are now four kinder- 
garteris, one in San Juan, one in Barrio Brero, one in Ponce, and one in 
Aibonito. These four kindergartens take care of about 300 little children 
and come for the most part from the poorest homes. Some are from just 
"little hole-in-the-wall" places, the equivalent of our tenements. Some are 
from the worst slum district in San Juan, La Perla, where the homes are 
mere shacks on stilts clinging to the steep incline above the ocean. All chil- 
dren have the same loving care and treatment when they come to the kin- 
dergarten. 

We are never able to take into the kindergarten all who clamor to come. 
I wish I could make you see the longing look on the faces of the group 
which is almost always to be found hanging about the kindergarten door — 
that group of little urchins for whom there is no room, looking with envy 
at the group within having such a good time playing games, listening to 
stories, singing songs, and doing handwork. Then, too, you would see the 
contrast between the two groups. The kindergarten children come cleaned 
up and well combed, for they have learned why it is desirable to be clean 
and good. They have had the story of Jesus and how he loves little chil- 
dren, and how he taught them to love one another. 

Each teacher conducts her kindergarten in the Sunday-school room of 
a Methodist church. Her little charges of weekdays are urged to attend 
the Sunday school. Most of them do attend, and this makes the first link 
between home and church many times. The teacher calls in the homes of 
her children, and this means much to those homes where the teacher is 
received with something akin to awed respect. 

Because schooling is at such a premium in Puerto Rico, the kindergartens 
assist in giving a child a slight advantage when it comes to entei'ing the 
public school. Due to the ovei'crowded condition of the public schools, we 
have added a first grade to our San Juan Kindergarten. Here the children 
learn to read, write, and do number work. From our first grade the public 
school accepts them in the second grade. This group is in charge of Miss 
Mercedes Nunez, one of our own graduates of Geo. 0. Robinson, who has 
completed her high-school work in an extension course with honors. 

Another of our graduates conducts the kindergarten at Aibonito, a 
little town beautifully situated in the mountains. Marita Rosich has called 
Geo. O. Robinson her home ever since she was about four years old. Now 
she is serving her Master in this kindergarten, caring for his little ones. 

Mrs. Mari Maldenado has charge of the kindergarten in Barrio Brero, 
and Mrs. Carmen Perez conducts the one in Ponce, the second largest city 
in Puerto Rico. Every month each teacher comes into San Juan to get 
plans and inspiration for their work from the kindergarten director. 

Our juniors give to our kindergartens each year $1,000 for the mid- 
morning lunch, which consists of fruit and crackers or milk. Each morning, 
after hands are washed, they sit down together, and with bowed heads give 
thanks to the Heavenly Father. This grace is often the first English they 
learn, as well as the first prayer. Each child is expected to bring eight 
cents per week, for we feel that if some sacrifice is made the service is 
appreciated more than if given for nothing. 



Bureaus. 



221 




Hospital Internacional 



Santo Domingo 

Barney Morgan, Superintendent 

TT is our privilege to participate in co-operation with the Presbyterians 
and the United Brethren in a great missionary enterprise in this neigh- 
boring Republic. Santo Domingo occupies two thirds of one of the larger 
islands of the West Indies, Haiti comprising the other third. From the 
beginning of the Evangelical Mission in the Dominican Republic, it has 
been the plan to present Christ through four channels — evangelical, educa- 
tional, social, and medical. 

Although there has been a great deal of political unrest since the 
Haitian massacre, no real change in leadership has occurred. The former 
president, Trujillio, did not run again this past election, but his former 
vice-president did run and was elected. All this has resulted in some un- 
easiness, but the chux'ches have gone forward in spite of it. The two 
phases of the work most effected by the unsettled economic conditions were 
the bookstore (which supplies both English and Spanish literature) and the 
Hospital Internacional. 

The Hospital still continues with its nursing school, although there has 
recently been established a Red Cross School of Nurses. A new law makes 
it imperative that all nurses practicing in the Republic must pass examina- 
tions and receive a diploma from either the School of Nurses of the Na- 
tional University (nonexistant at present) or the Red Cross School. Ar- 
rangements have been made whereby the nurses of the Hospital Interna- 
cional take their examinations with those of the Red Cross School. It is 
of interest that one of the nurses heading up the Red Cross Nursing School 
is a graduate of the Hospital Internacional. One of our doctors. Dr. R. R. 
Cohan, has recently inaugurated a course of lectures on "child care" for 
mothers and prospective mothers. This is the first effort of this kind in 
the Republic, and follows most appropriately the pioneering work of our 
Hospital in prenatal care and infant feeding. 

Dr. Luis E. Manon, one of the young staff doctors, has recently come 
up to Brooklyn Methodist Hospital to take a course in X-ray. He will 
go back to the Hospital well prepared to take chai'ge of an X-ray depart- 
ment. We are still looking for a generous gift of $2,500 to buy the X-i*ay 
equipment. 

Again this summer the Religious Education Institute was larger than 
any held before. About eighty young people registered. An outstanding 
feature of this largest and most successful Institute was that specifically 
educational courses were given. These were attended not only by the dele- 
gates, but by public school teachers. If a new day is dawning in the edu- 
cational life of the Dominican Republic, the Evangelical Church is providing 
some of the light. 



222 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Japanese Bible Woman 

223 West 108th Street, New York, New York 
Mrs. Tokuji Komuro 

JjURING the past year the activities of the Japanese Methodist Episco- 
pal Church and Institute in g-eneral were encouraging. We received 
some new pupils in the Sunday school, and five new members were added 
to the membership of the church by transfers. A baby and an adult were 
baptized at the Easter service. There was a noticeable increase in the 
attendance of the Sunday services. 

Except for the summer months, the dormitory, which accommodates 
eighteen young men, was always full. This meant that we were in very 
close contact with them, and we were able to meet their spiritual needs 
and share their problems as well. The Ladies' Aid Society is helping to 
furnish the rooms of the dormitory, so that they will be more comfortable 
and homelike. The members of the Ladies' Aid Society are giving the 
activities of the Young People's Society whole-hearted support. The an- 
nual Thanksgiving dinner was sponsored by the members of the dormitory 
last year, and in the company of their friends a real joyous evening was 
spent by all. This meant a great deal to those away from their homes. 

Our work must go on in spite of many difficulties which are confronting 
us. Opening the new year in January with the two other Japanese churches 
in New York City, we planned a whole day program, aiming at three differ- 
ent themes: "Unity of the Christian people," "Advancement of the work 
of the young people and children," and finally, "To increase the influence 
of the Christian homes." Throughout the year 1938 we have been led to 
work toward the three aims, and have increased our efforts to unite in our 
Christian faith against worldly power. 

Easter and Mother's Day were observed with enthusiasm by the Sun- 
day-school children and members of the church. The Japanese Young Peo- 
ple's Federation held an early Easter morning service at Fort Tryon Park 
in the city. Surrounded by beautiful nature filled with new life, it was an 
inspiration to witness their sincere devotion and reverence toward God and 
the risen Christ. 

In June the second annual conference of the Japanese Christian Young 
People's Federation of the city of New York was held to discuss "The 
Ideal Home Life" of the American-born children and the parents with their 
Oriental background. The program was prepared by the young people. 
Quite a large number of the older people and parents from the three 
churches attended the conference, and the general public was also invited. 
The conference brought about a better understanding between the older 
people and the younger generation. 

During July a Daily Vacation Bible School was held, with an enroll- 
ment of seventeen. The theme was, "We Need Each Other." During the 
same month our church opened a Japanese language class at night for 
a period of six weeks, meeting three to four nights a week. Approxi- 
mately thirty people attended the class. The third year of the English 
class for Japanese women was continued, with an average of ten pupils 
in attendance at every class. The Japanese-American woman's club, which 
was organized a year and a half ago, meets once a month, and pleasant 
afternoons are spent exchanging our views and cultures with a real Chris- 
tian attitude. 

The study of the New Testament was started in February by a group 
of enthusiastic members every Wednesday evening after the weekly prayer 
meeting under the leadership of the pastor. Mr. Komuro. 

My visitations are mostly made on Thursdays and Fridays, when I 
visit the homes of the children in our Sunday school, members, and friends 
of the church. As they live in scattered distances, it takes quite a bit 
of time to complete my calls. 

We were very s-lad to receive visitors from the different confei'ences 
of The Woman's Home Missionary Society last year. I was privileged 
to tell about my work hei^e in the city, at the churches in Madison and 
Arlington, New Jersey, and also at White Stone, New York. 



Bureaus. 



223 



Rest Homes 

Mrs. Mary E. Stout, Secretary 

126 Lake Avenue, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 

Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home 

74 Cookman Avenue, Ocean Grove, New Jersey 
Ada B. Murphy, Superintendent 

gANCROFT-TAYLOR REST HOME, Ocean Grove, New Jersey, having- 

now forty-two years of service to its credit, has had the honor and 

privilege of caring for the first missionaries as the days of retirement came. 

May I remind you that Flora Mitchell, the first missionary, spent the 
last years of her life in Sunset. As one looked in to say good-moraing or 
afternoon she was found reading letters from "my girls." Elsa B. Dole, 
another one of the first missionaries, was a member of our family ten years; 
she lived in Bancroft, never quite happy in being away from the "people 
she knew best," she would say. Susan M. Lewis, who loved and laboi'ed 
during the first days of Haven Home, lived in the Rest Home twelve years, 
suffering with shaking palsy, yet she made valuable contributions to the 
church and home life. Miss M. Ella Becker, another of our first missionaries, 
was a member of the family twelve years, and received the love and devo- 
tion of hundreds of the young women who called her their "sure inspira- 
tion." Miss Harriet Emerson lived with the family twelve years; she had 
labored and founded the work for Negro girls at many points in the South- 
land, and for many years the postman brought letters, cards, and packages 
to her in large numbers. How she enjoyed this loving remembrance by those 
she loved as her very own! 

Truly these five first missionaries needed care and understanding hearts 
to minister to them; strange as it seems, there was no other home for them 
to enter, and where were they to go? Surely the Rest Home offered much 
to them when they needed a bit of attention and a place whei^e they were able 
to receive their friends, and to live with those who had lived and labored 
in the same cause. 

Many, many moi"e blessed women have passed through the doors at 
Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home to go out no more. 

It is a pleasant satisfaction to hear from the many workers, missionaries, 
and deaconesses, words of praise, and look into eyes that tell you over and 
over again how much they appreciate "this home"; how strength gained 
and refreshment of soul helps them to do the work the coming year; and 
again and again we listen to "Free from anxiety of support through the 
pension for retired workers, so wisely provided by The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society; we rest in the safety of the Home!" Social Security, 
provided by a Christian organization. 

During the year forty-nine deaconesses and twelve missionaries have 
lived or have spent a vacation at Bancroft-Taylor. 

The bazaar held August 18 and 19 was given wide publicity, and the 
result was most gratifying and the family was made very happy. 

The family continues to meet each Friday afternoon to make articles 
to sell; proceeds go for upkeep of home. The stitchery is a happy occasion. 

The members of the family have enjoyed excellent health this year, and 
we enter the coming year with high hopes for a happy and successful year. 



Bancroft-Taylor 
Rest Home 




224 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Rohincroft Rest Home 

245 East Washing:ton Street, Pasadena, California 
Mabel M. Metzger, Superintendent 

yi NOTHER interesting year has passed, and each day and week have 

brought new opportunities and responsibilities. 

The permanent family numbers twenty-two. More than thirty active 
workers have been entertained for vacations and longer periods of rest 
during the year. 

The annual bazaar is the event of the year, and the funds are always 
used for repairs and improvements not provided for in the annual budget. 
The proceeds this year were $335, and a porch joining the dining I'oom was 
enclosed in glass, adding much needed space to the overcrowded dining room. 

Miss Adda Benedict, deaconess, Mrs. Helen Lincoln, deaconess, and Mrs. 
Ella Hartshorn, deaconess, who have given long and effective service to the 
Society, are the new and very welcome members this year. 

Robincroft Memorial Guild has taken on new impetus under the leader- 
ship of the new pi-esident, Mrs. Merle N. Smith. 

The building fund is growing, and we trust our "castle in the air" will 
soon materialize into a tangible structure so we will be able to accommodate 
that long list of faithful workers who have reached that period in their lives 
when they must "rest awhile." 




Robincroft is not just a place to live, but a real home, made possible 
by the Christian women of the church. 

An Appreciation. After a long and useful life, Mary A. Crawford, retired 
deaconess, passed away at Robincroft Rest Home in Pasadena, California, 
on July 15, 1938. The service of memory was conducted by her pastor, Dr. 
George B. Cliff, of the Washington Street Methodist Church. 

Reared in a Methodist parsonage early in life, she became acquainted 
with church work. Her wide associations in the religious world gave her 
many choice friends, and all those personalities helped enrich and perpetuate 
inspii'ation which went into the building of this victorious life. 

Miss Crawford heard the call of deaconess work and entered the Lucy 
Webb Hayes National Training School, Washington, D. C. On May 19, 1897, 
she graduated and was licensed as a deaconess in October, 1897. 

She served many outstanding churches in conferences of the Middle 
West. In 1916 she came West and the rest of her ministry was given to 
Mount Tabor Church in Portland, Oregon, and to Washington Street Church 
in Pasadena, California. Forty years of service to the Methodist Church 
was her record. 

She spent her retiring thirteen years in beautiful Robincroft, and at 
the age of eighty-two she was called to her reward, to be forever with her 
Lord and Master. 




Fenton Memorial Rest Home 

Chautauqua, New Yoi'k 

jyi ORE than once the remark has been heard when coming across the bridge 
spanning the deep, wooded ravine: "Wealthy people live in that beau- 
tiful red brick house on the top of the hill. See how beautifully the mowed 
lawn slopes down to the road and those pretty flower boxes at the windows, 
the two porches with awnings and porch furniture." 

The deaconesses who have the privilege of spending a few weeks in 
this lovely home do appreciate all these rich blessings. They are grateful 
to Mr. Fenton for giving such a fine memorial for his wife and mother, 
furnishing it so attractively and locating it just where he did, so that from 
every window are viewed scenes of beauty — either the lake, with all its 
changing moods, or majestic woods with bird choruses, or the beautiful 
lawns and flower gardens of our neighbors, and always lovely views of blue, 
sun-tinted, or clouded sky. 

The individual rooms are both comfortable and attractively furnished. 

The fellowship with the other workers around the breakfast table in 
the cozy breakfast room adds another joy to these restful, helpful, inspiring 
days at Chautauqua. 



Chautauqua Mission House 

Chautauqua, New York 
Mrs. Orah T. Hilkert, Hostess 

'J'HE Chautauqua Mission Home is a Vacation Rest Home for foreign and 
home missionaries. This is the Lakeside home. It is most attractive 
and enjoyable because it is beautiful and spacious, with large, airy rooms, 
quiet and restful, overlooking Chautauqua Lake, with a panorama of hills 
to be seen in the distance. Profitable because Chautauqua is unique in hav- 
ing eight weeks of cultural program and classes in which the best in reli- 
gion, music, art, drama, and recreation are presented each day. It is the 
privilege of everyone to attend these various groups. Our missionaries 
feast and replenish their "storehouse" with new ideas and plans for the 
coming year's work. 

Twenty-six missionaries have vacationed at the Rest Home this summer, 
which is the largest number in years. One of the workers remarked, "It is 
such a comfort to us who no longer have a home to know that we do have 
a beautiful Rest Home provided where we may go each summer and spend 
our vacation weeks so enjoyable and profitably." 
8 225 



226 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 




Kunning water has been installed in five additional rooms. The front 
porch was inviting with its new paint, new rugs, and cushions. 

Mrs. R. C. Richards, hostess for the past eleven years, said good-by to 
Chautauqua Rest Home last September. Mrs. Richards gave her best in 
service to Chautauqua Mission House, who came weary and worn from the 
year's work. She won many friends for the Home, and she loved it de- 
votedly, doing everything possible to make her guests comfortable. 

Thompson Rest Home 

Mountain Lake Park, Maryland 
Octavia Hicks, Superintendent 

"yniS is a year for rejoicing— 1898-1938. Happy Birthday! 

Miss Hicks is the devoted one at the helm. Many expressions of ap- 
preciation are heard in dining room and on roomy porches and in the vicinity 
of the Rest Home. This is said to be second to none in Mountain Lake Park. 
During the year a new roof was placed on the annex and other repairs made 
necessary for the protection of family and buildings. 

Eleven deaconesses and four missionartes have spent their vacations here. 

The property is in excellent condition. Mountain Lake Park is under 
new management. The new owner plans to repair the buildings; better 
programs are in the making, and everyone seems happy at Mountain Lake 
Park that it still will be the Christian vacation community it has always 
been in the past years. 




Bureaus. 



227 



The National Training School 

East Fifteenth Street and Denver Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri 
Dr. Anna Neiderheiser, President 

Standing as it does almost in the geographical center of the United 

States, the Training School reaches out in every direction in its useful- 
ness. Indeed, its influence is world-wide, and the past year has revealed this 
in many ways. 

In January we had the privilege of entertaining the Board of Trustees. 
It was a very happy experience for all concerned. Dur'ing that week our 
missionary organization held its annual banquet and the dining room was 
filled with local and national guests. A program of great interest was given 
by the students and national officers. 

Our library has had many additions in new books, and Is in need of more 
room for expansion. Many books have been rebound during the year. We 
rejoice in having Miss Nettie Judd, class of '19, as full-time librarian. She 
is untiring in her service in behalf of staff and students. 

The extra-curricular activities of the school year were unusually happy 
ones. The family birthday party was held in October, when a campaign 
was launched for subscriptions to the Kanms City Deaconesf^. Sophomore 
Day (Good Friday), with its spiritual emphasis, closed with a Bible play 
given by the class. The special speaker of the day was Dr. Cassius English 
Street, pastor of Linwood Boulevard Methodist Church. William A. Quayle 
Day (Easter Monday), the annual Nature Day, closed with a fellowship 
dinner and program, with the staff and nurses of Bethany Hospital as guests. 
May Day was the high day for the junior class. Their gift to the school 
was a beautiful hand-carved oak table for the reception hall. The inter- 
class games during the year-, and the publication of our annual, the Shield, 
engaged the earnest attention and effort of the student body. 

Not only is the scholastic work of the School of the highest, but in a 
peculiar way the School participates in the work of our own Methodist 
organizations, the Council of Churches, and the social and philanthropic 
interests of Greater Kansas City. 

Commencement was not only a going out of our senior class, but a 
happy reunion of alumnae from far and near. More than eighty participated 
in some part of the services of commencement week. The commencement 
address was given by Bishop Ralph S. Cushman, of Denver, Colorado. 

So many calls for our graduates have come that the members of the class 
of 1938 are placed with more additional calls than could be met. All have 
gone to serve in institutions of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 
We are glad to report that the student body in the Training School for this 
year has increased more than twenty-five per cent. 




228 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Specials 

Work Among Sailors and Soldiers 

Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Navy Yard 
Edith L. Smith, Deaconess 

" Vy E DO so like to see Miss Smith come in, for she seems to bring a bit 
of home to us." Thus said a boy detained in the Naval Prison for a 
military offense, as many of them are, to his mother who was visitinj? him. 
Because I knew she would be lonely and sad in her room at night, thinking: 
of her boy in prison, I went over to spend a little time with her. She told 
me what her son had said. Many of the boys have said the same thing to 
me personally — "The only touch of home we have;" "You come to us like 
a mother;" "Don't know what we would do without you." Playing for the 
church services, visits. Bibles, magazines, Christmas and Easter cards, 
Easter plants, and candy at Christmas are all appreciated. To one boy a 
few lessons were given on "How we got our Bible." 

The Naval Hospital is not forgotten. One boy who was in a cast for three 
months and others who were operated on, retired men who have put thirty- 
five years in the navy, these and many more who have been coming and 
going throughout the year appreciated the visits, the Christmas and Easter 
cards, the plants and flowers, the magazines, the errands and various other 
things done for them throughout the year. While they have every care, 
the hours are long in bed, and some of them, especially the navy boys, have 
no other visitor except the deaconess. 

This year we have had the largest Sunday school in the Navy Yard for 
some years. Calling in the homes, playing the piano, teaching, drilling the 
children for Christmas and Easter exercises, and a Christmas playlet for 
the Christmas party for all the children, gave the deaconess an influence 
among the children and in their homes. A club for girls of nine and ten 
years of age were g'iven instruction in missionary work. A little playlet 
in costume representing children of different nationalities in our country, 
also the migrant children, was presented by them. 

Many calls have been made in the homes of the navy families. More 
of the men coming in on the boats were married and many had small chil- 
dren. Sometimes the father is out to sea and does not see the new arrival 
until the baby is two or three months old. The new mother has almost no 
one to visit her while in the hospital except the deaconess. These young 
wives and mothers, so far from their own people, and often living in not 
the most pleasant rooms, for Portsmouth cannot boast of modern apart- 
ments at small cost, appeal much to me. Three were born in Hawaii; all 
three had small children. Two Indian girls, aged fifteen and sixteen, came 
here to marry Filipinos. One sailor's wife, practically a stranger here, had 
a broken leg. One little woman was left by her husband without means 
and three children were put in a home. Broken-hearted she came to me. A 
small sum of money was arranged to be given to her each month by him 
and work and a room were found for her. 

Letters are sometimes written to wives and mothers. Every boy is some 
mother's son, and she appreciates letters and anything done for her boy. 

Fifty comfort bags and a lot of magazines were given to an outbound 
boat for the tropics. 

_ These are just a few of the happenings of the deaconess that have come 
this year. Duties vary from day to day. People are constantly changing. 
I meet many types, and have many opportunities of vai'ious kinds, among 
all ages and all nationalities. 

The good old Book says, "My word shall not return unto me void." So 
we believe that a kind act, an encouraging, a helpful or kind word spoken 
are not lost. 




Leper Work — Marine Hospital No. 66 

Carville, Louisiana 
A, Preston Boyd, Chaplain 

yi LL who have been readers of the Annual Report in the previous years 
have learned something of the destructiveness of leprosy to the human 
body. As you know, it generally leaves the individual either blind, footless, 
handless, or with the sense of touch or taste gone. In other words, it is 
like the biting frost which destroys the beauty of the rose and strips the 
trees of all their attractiveness, leaving them barren and desolate, seemingly 
dead but still living. 

The public should not shun, neglect, or forget those who are thus un- 
fortunately afflicted. They are just as human as other people. There they 
are, 360 of them, shut off from society and all personal fellowship with 
friends. For them there is no business or professional career, no popular 
beach, no fashionable mountain resort where they may go. What is there 
for the leper? From a woi^ldly standpoint the outlook is not inspiring or 
very hopeful. Death is attractive to any of us. But for the Christian 
leper the future is bright, for he lives — he lives more gloriously, more tri- 
umphantly, a conqueror, a prince, and a son of God! 

Here is an experience of a very dear young man who has been a great 
sufferer. His mother from the North recently visited him for a few days. 
After her departure I called to see Frank. Speaking of his mother he said, 
"Pastor, that"— pointing to her photograph on the bureau — "is the finest 
mother any boy ever had." I replied, "Frank, what makes you think your 
mother is the finest mother any boy ever had?" He replied emphatically, 
"She is a Christian." That was true, for she is a godly woman and a con- 
secrated mother. Only a few days ago I was called to his sick room and 
had a heart-to-heart talk with him on spiritual matters, and again he 
remarked: "My mother's devoted Christian life led me to love Jesus. Chap- 
lain, I shall soon be dead, but I will see my mother again." I said: "You 
certainly shall. But, Frank, there is something better than that for you. 
When you come to enter the valley and shadow of death, God will be there 
and you 'shall be like him, for you shall see him as he is.' 'What! I, with 
this poor, sick, broken body?' 'Yes, that's it.'" The next day one of the 
deaconesses assisted me in administering the Holy Communion, and in a 
short time he went home to be with his Heavenly Father. 

This is only one of the many experiences in our work among those whom 
we love. Some eighteen have died since Christmas. But not all have died 
in the faith. It is a dreadful thing to see a man die without having saving 
grace in the Lord Jesus Christ and buried without a religious service. 

If every one of you home missionary women of our great Methodist 
Church would spend a few days, in this leper colony, you would understand 
why I am making a plea for your prayers and your interest. 

229 



230 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

More Migrants 

Mrs. Mildred Allen Knight, Committee Member 

I^^HE number of migrants in the United States has increased recently. 
This is due to the economic conditions, loss of jobs and fai'ms, the in- 
creasing demand of the American faniily for fresh fruit and vegetables 
and cheaper canned goods. The migrant, therefore, is here to stay, and 
what to do about him is one of America's great and newly discovered prob- 
lems. It will be necessary for the nation to make life more agreeable and 
conditions more tolerable for those who migrate from ci'op to crop. Too 
long has the American family taken for granted the food on the table, 
ignoring the conditions under which it has been planted, harvested, and 
delivered to the home, and ignorant of the welfare of the laborer. Two 
million is a conservative estimate of the number of migrants. So vast a 
homeless, unschooled, unchurched, neglected group of human beings threat- 
ens the very life of the nation. "Migrant labor camps are the slums of 
rural America." 

The conditions under which many of these people live are unbelievable. 
While an increasing number of employers have erected shacks for their 
laborers, thousands must still live in places unfit for any humans. A former 
(JJ director of the, iRural Resettlement Division^ of the United States Resettle- 
ment Administration thus describes one camp: 

Migrants' camp, 75G individuals, and on the adjoining lot, 415 individuals. 
Here was a small city, a city without order, a city of neglected souls. The san- 
itary facilities available were most inadequate. The only water supply was 
furnished by a broken hand pump. So great was the demand for space that 
tents were pitched wall aga'inst wall. Here and there a "lean to," called 
"hide-behinds" by the children, dotted the acreage, while on the outer 
fringe of it all many had thrown their mattresses or bedding in the dirt 
and the sand, having abandoned all thought or hope of privacy. With the 
great variety of tents and housing facilities, the whole thing resembled a 
crazy quilt stretched out on a carpet of rubbish and debris, against a back- 
ground of filth, and with an atmosphere of stench. Adding to the misery 
of it all, flies swarmed by the millions. 

The health nurse is most important to these needy people. Sometimes 
when the season opens and thousands crowd into a camp she is only tolerated 
and looked on with suspicion; but as the days pass she becomes friend of all 
and is indispensable. She is counselor and guide to the migrant mother, 
follow-up worker to the doctor, play fellow and story teller for the children. 
She becomes a "go-between'' for boss and family. She is always comforter 
to families in moments of tragedy and sorrow. One nurse tells this experi- 
ence in her story hour in one camp: 

Because many of the children understood very little English, I tried 
various ways to help them understand the story. Finally, I made paper 
figures of people to place on the table as I went along. Afterward they could 
make their own figures and retell the story in their own words. When one 
ten-year-old boy was retelling the story of "Let the children come unto 
me," with the use of paper people, he said, "The men wanted to keep the 
children away, but Jesus said — " and he stumbled over the long verse he 
had just learned, but finally said, using the words of his own vocabulary, 
"Jesus said, 'Let 'em come.' " 

The church reaches out with its help through the Council of Women for 
Home Missions. Every Center opened and maintained; every nurse, teacher, 
social and welfare worker, and student engaged; every person interested 
means better times for these people. "Other sheep have I which are not 
of this fold, these also must I bring." Could Christ have meant these 
migrants ? 



Stories of Conference Work 

Baltimore 

Baltimore Deaconess Home 

605 Cathedral Sti-eet, Baltimore, Maryland 
Nancy E. Dorey, Superintendent 

The Baltimore Deaconess Home is located in what might well be called a 
downtown religious center, being- surrounded by institutions of our own and 
other denominations. Living in such a locality gives many opportunities 
for service. The aim is not only to furnish a Christian home for the dea- 
conesses, but to extend a hand of welcome to all who may call upon them 
for help or for hospitality. 

Swartzeil Methodist Home for Children 

6200 Second Street Northwest, Washington, D. C. 
Dorothy E. Graiflin, Superintendent 

Swartzeil Home has continued its ministry during the year to the boys 
and girls of Washington Methodism. The public schools which they attend 
and their church activities bring them into normal contacts with other chil- 
dren. Several of the girls have attended institutes and a group of boys 
had a fine camp experience during the summer. Mrs. John R. Edwards 
succeeds Mrs. B. T. Hynson as president, the latter continuing as treasurer 
of the Board of Managers. 

Washington Deaconess Home 

2907 13th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Mae Smith, Superintendent 

This is a home for deaconesses working in Methodist churches in Wash- 
ington, as religious education directors, parish workers, and as leaders for 
children and young people. Three taught at summer camps and two in reli- 
gious education camps; 11,442 calls were made during the year; 4,191 chil- 
dren, 3,208 young people, and 1,064 adults were taught, and 3,563 meetings 
were attended, conducted, or arranged for. 

Wo-Ho-Mis Lodge C^V^ 

607-609 Park Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland ,[,''.1 , 

Mrs. M. V. Hubbard, Superintendent 

The work at the Lodge grows more fascinating with the years as the 
women of Baltiniore Conference make their contribution to the young women 
of the world. [At the present time there are forty-five businesswomen and 
eighteen students. Any girl, irrespective of her denominational afiiliation, 
is welcome^! Three birthday group dinners took the form of real parties. 
Every Sunday the girls take turns in leading at the half-hour devotional 
service. 

California 

Beulah Rest Home 

4690 Tompkins Avenue, Oakland, California 
Lurene Seymoure, Superintendent 

In the beautiful hills of East Oakland is Beulah Rest Home for aged 
men and women. The family of thirty members is happy and well cared for. 
With direct bus transportation across the new eight-mile bridge to San 

231 



232 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Francisco, our Home is easily reached by guests and friends. We are pray- 
ing and working for an endowment fund so that we might fill our empty 
rooms with needy people. 

Deaconess Work 

San Francisco, California 

The work of our conference deaconesses is greatly varied — -pastor's as- 
sistant, juvenile court work, kindergarten, preaching, teaching, and visit- 
ing. Having no central home, a board of local women sponsors them, giving 
them a feeling of belonging to someone. Vacation time is often spent in the 
delightful deaconess cottage at Beulah Rest Home. Through an organiza- 
tion of their own, the deaconesses keep in contact with each other, having 
a reunion now and then. 

, 1 1 Central New York 

r ^ 7 Italian Mission, Church of the Redeemer 

' 212 Catawba Street, Syracuse, New York 

^ Elizabeth J. Taylor, Worker 

I Classes at the Syracuse Italian Mission have been conducted with boys 
arl3" girls after school, enrollment being thiirty-five. A dramatic club of 
fifteen, a choir, and a woman's group of twenty complete the general 
week-day activities. A church school of sixty, morning worship in Italian, 
and a combined Epworth League and evening service in English make the 
average Sunday. 

St. John's Itahan Mission 

West Sixth Street, Elmira, New York 
Mrs. Josephine Buono, Worker 

On September 11 a rededication service was held at St. John's Italian 
Mission, Elmira, New York, the church having been newly painted outside 
and inside. Both Italian and American friends attended and were delighted 
in the change in the appearance of the building. The pastor, Rev. Plegrino 
Buono, and his faithful wife, are doing a splendid work in a social and 
spiritual way for the Italians of Elmira. 

Central Pennsylvania 

Harrishurg Deaconess Center 

1220 N. Seventh Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Ula M. Garrison, Superintendent 

During the past year the Center has brought happiness to the hearts 
of many underprivileged Negro children through its weekly program of 
activities. Because of the crime and low morals which exist in this crowded 
and sordid environment, we feel that our Center is needed more than ever. 
Many of our children have no other Christian teaching or form of recrea- 
tion. The work, play, and worship all have one aim, that of building strong 
Christian characters. 

Italian Methodist Episcopal Church 

804 Sixth Street, Altoona, Pennsylvania 
Anna K. Nestor, Deaconess 

Church services are conducted each Sunday by the pastor, the Rev. 
D'Elia, in the Italian language. Through the Sunday school, weekday club 
and classes in the kindergarten each morning, we touch over three hundred 
people in the community, largely Italian. A new venture this summer was 
a Daily Vacation Bible School, with forty enrolled. Three volunteer teach- 
ers assisted the deaconess. 



Conference Work. 233 

Kulpniont Mission 

Kulpmont, Pennsylvania 
Bertha A. Goodale, Deaconess 

In this mining town reside people of many nationalities. Beer gardens 
abound and vice is rampant. The only place that the children have to play 
is on the streets. Here you will find a Mission that is putting on a four- 
fold program for the building of Christian characters. It is a busy place — 
kindergarten, boys' and girls' clubs held after school, club meetings in the 
evening, missionary societies, and a library. 

Colorado 

Leadville, Colorado 
Rachel Pease, Deaconess 

The deaconess continues to carry on a Christian community work in 
this mining town among the children and young people especially. Four 
hundred and twelve were enrolled in the Sunday school and classes. The 
deaconess has charge of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and through her 
home carries on a community work. 

Margaret Evans Deaconess Home 

1630 Ogden Street, Denver, Colorado 
Mrs. Lorena Finley, Superintendent 

The Margaret Evans Deaconess Home, Denver, was established in the 
year of 1898, and named for the wife of the first governor of Colorado. 
Everything is done by the splendid board women for the comfort and joy 
of the deaconesses who live here and serve in parishes and missionary 
centers. One deaconess gives her time to the Mexican church and people, 
directing the religious education work and all of the music. 

Delaware 

Friendship Home 

1939 North 22d Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Mrs. Eleanor P. Thomas, Superintendent 

Philadelphia Friendship Home continues to be filled to capacity and 
many girls have been turned away for lack of room. The local school board 
is negotiating the purchase of all houses in this block so that that will 
necessitate our removal. May this prove to be a blessing in disguise, one 
that will give us a larger and better home. 

Detroit 

Detroit City Missions 

The salary of one deaconess who works among the many nationalities 
of her church is paid by the Society. 

Detroit Deaconess Home 

437 Putnam Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 
Florence K. Eslinger, Superintendent 

The Home stands as a beacon light in a great city, with its deaconesses 
ministering to the underprivileged of nine races. Its sei-vice has extended 
to 3,747 children and 1,800 adults. 



234 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Detroit Esther Hall 

1191 Merrick Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 
Lillie Macomber, Superintendent 

This Home for working girls is filled to capacity, having forty-one girls 
there at pi'esent. The Young Woman's Missionary Society reports a very 
good year. The business recession has touched a good many of the girls 
living here, so more than ever we feel this Home has served its purpose, 

Detroit Friendship Home 

6100 Scotten Avenue, Detroit, Michigan 
Mrs. Maude Bowdoin, Superintendent 

This Home, though small, is fulfilling its purpose of providing a Chris- 
tian home for the Negro working girl. It is filled to capacity — nine girls 
and the superintendent. Within the last year the Home has been painted 
outside and redecorated inside so the property is in very fine condition. 
During the summer a large garden, with its abundance of vegetables and 
flowers, has been a delight to everyone. 



Erie 

Irene Maitland Deaconess Home 

107 Phillips Street, New Castle, Pennsylvania 
Ida Schnackel, Superintendent 

The Home stands as a lighthouse pointing the way to those who may 
be searching for the light, instilling new hope and courage into those v/ith 
whom the deaconesses come in contact. We rejoice in the increasing op- 
portunities open for Christian leadership and service. In the full confidence 
of guidance of the Holy Spirit the deaconesses go forth in service. 

Ruth M. Smith Children's Home 

Sheffield, Pennsylvania 
Dora M. Feldman, Superintendent 

With its spacious grounds and well-equipped buildings, this is an ideal 
Home for twenty-five to thirty children. The home atmosphere is happy 
and congenial, and both boys and girls are given training through various 
duties about the Home which enables them to be self-i'eliant and co-oper- 
ative. They take an active interest in the local church and school affairs, 
and during the past year the Home Guards and Girl Scouts have made en- 
viable records. 

Genesee 

Buffalo Deaconess Home and Settlement House 

24 Kosciuszko Street, Buffalo, New York 
Mrs. Emmeline Lonsdale, Superintendent 

One of the most gratifying years of this institution has just closed. 
Upwards of 1,100 diffex^ent people have taken advantage of the Christian 
influence and wholesome environment provided for them. Creative hand- 
work, clean recreation and social activities, religious training and guidance 
through personal contacts have made a marked change in a community 
where juvenile crime was the highest in any part of the city. There are 
five missionary organizations among these Polish people at the Settlement. 



Conference Work. 235 

Buffalo Friendship Home 

300 Jefferson Avenue, Buffalo, New York 
Mrs. Margaret Smith, Superintendent 

The newest feature of the work at Buffalo Friendship Home is the play- 
ground in the rear for the community children. Kind friends donated the 
playground equipment and drinking fountain. More than 200 children have 
used the playground this summer, safe and happy under the supervision of 
Christian workers. 

niinois 

Cunningham Chiklren's Home 

Urbana, Illinois 
Mrs. Charlotte Fitzgerald, Superintendent 

Situated on the highway No. 45, just north of Urbana, is the estate of 
Judge Cunningham, which he left to the Illinois Conference forty-thi-ee 
years ago to be used as a children's home. During that time many changes 
have been made and hundreds of children have been benefited by the fore- 
sight of this good man. It has been with regret this past year that we 
have seen the original Cunningham building torn down, although we ai-e 
very happy to have it replaced by the Spaulding Hall, which was dedicated 
May 8, 1938. Our children attend the public schools and take part in many 
outside activities. 

Langleyville Settlement House 

Langleyville, Illinois 
Zee L. King, Superintendent 

This year has been very successful as we have sought definitely to serve 
each individual. The Settlement House is located in a strategic center, 
serving a foreign constituency — Italians, French, and Lithuanians — and the 
superintendent has tried to meet the ever-changing needs of this commu- 
nity through a spiritual, industrial, educational, and recreational program. 

Indiana 

Glenburn-Van Hook Mission 

Linton, Indiana 
Nola D. Yoder, Director 

The citizenship class is held two nights each week, and four of the 
members received their citizenship papers during the year. A craft room 
has been completed and is open six days each week. The average attend- 
ance in the Daily "Vacation Bible School was 122. Fifty or more have knelt 
at the altar confessing Christ or renewing their broken promise unto him. 

Indiana Conference Deaconess Home 

1241 North New Jersey Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 
Mae Ledgerwood, Housemother 

Located in the capital city of Indiana, this Home provides an ideal place 
for the five deaconesses during rest hours. Their work consists of religious 
education for adults and juniors, kindei'garten. summer Bible school, and 
playground at community center. Weekday Bible classes in factory and 
churches, almost 4,000 visits in homes and hospitals, 103 lectures on Pal- 
estine, 30 thank-offering addresses, 80 services in jails and women's prison 
are some of their activities. 



236 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

lowa-Des Moines 

Conference Social Service Department 

921 Pleasant Street, Des Moines, Iowa 
Hannah K. Binau, Supervisor 

The year just passed marks an advance in all our activities. One hun- 
dred and twenty-three mothers enrolled in sewing classes made 906 garments 
from used materials; 237 pair of mittens from wool scraps; 42 quilts, besides 
the work of a successful bazaar and gift shop project through which was 
cleared $205. Our community groups, meeting monthly in homes in different 
sections of the city, have been very helpful. The children's work is growing 
with 332 children on the list. The worship and Bible study period has a 
very definite place in the daily schedule. 

Riverside Coninmnity House 

S. E. Fourteenth Street Court, Des Moines, Iowa 
Edith Compton, Missionary 

The Community House, through Bible study. Queen Esther, Vacation 
Bible School, library and story hour, music class, handcraft, recreational 
clubs, mothers' sewing class and supply work, community night, and home 
visitation, endeavors to provide a fourfold program that will build Chris- 
tian characters in the community. 

Kansas 

Crawford County Larger Parish 

Bernice Close, Missionary 

The ultimate aim in this parish is to promote the growth of Christian 
character, with no regard to race or nationality. Clubs for women, young 
people, boys, and girls have been organized in every community. Sunday 
schools, church services, and Epworth Leagues are being conducted with 
every group. During the summer months the vacation church schools and 
the nursery schools gave splendid opportunity to boys and girls, even the 
women, for development of Christian character and leadership through their 
worship services, discussion periods, and hobby classes. 

Methodist Mexican Mission 

1044 South 26th Street, Kansas City, Kansas 
Catherine Ferguson, Deaconess 

Our vision: our 1,000 Mexicans for Christ. Our plan: every effective 
means. Our work: religious education, social welfare, and recreation. 
Renewed activity and effective leadership in recreation are made possible 
by the tempoi^ary gift by the Sinclair Oil Company of a large fenced play- 
ground. With the help of Government leaders and equipment, a fine play- 
ground has been set up. 

Maine 

Italian Methodist Episcopal Churches 

130 Federal Street and 360 Warren Avenue, Portland, Maine 
Agnes E. Vose, Deaconess 

Maine Conference co-operates vs^ith the Board of Home Missions in help- 
ing to support the deaconess who is the assistant to the pastor. The work 



Conference Work. 237 

of the mission was founded in 1904 and is now a well-organized church with 
two centers and a membership of about 170. The church schools have an 
enrollment of 120 and the weekday activities, 150. Regular church services 
and Sunday schools, work among the young people and children in choirs, 
clubs, Epworth Leagues, Queen Esthers, and vacation Bible schools are 
among the activities carried on. 



Michigan 



Aldrich Deaconess Home and Esther Hall 

523 Lyon Street, Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Mrs. Myrtle Bass Duncan, Superintendent 

In telling the aim for Esther Hall, one board member expressed it very 
concisely, "A place in which to keep good girls good." The economic con- 
ditions of the past few years have made the necessity for the Hall more 
evident. Junior college and a number of business and professional institu- 
tions have been bringing girls of a lower gi'oup age to the city. These are 
the ones who need the protective and Christian influence the Hall offers. 

Forest Glen Comniunity House 

Battle Creek, Michigan 
Mary E. Shoemaker, Deaconess 

The past year has been one of increased interest. The church school 
attendance has been larger. Four older boys and girls have asked for bap- 
tism; four small children were baptized. The nursery school has been a 
service to children and their mothers. Vacation school was greatly enjoyed. 

Grand Rapids Community House 

The Community House is in a district that is rapidly becoming com- 
mercial. For the past thirty years it has been trying to meet the social 
and religious needs of the constantly changing racial population. It is the 
only place in this neighborhood where members of more than fifteen diffei'ent 
nationalities can gather for quiet reading and meditation. The nui'sery 
school is constantly expanding. A newly equipped playground is making 
for safety and co-operation. 

Olney Rest Home 

Ludington, Michigan 

Olney Rest Home is the ideal place for our deaconesses and missionaries 

*to spend a week or their entire vacation. Each year under the management 

of a fine local boai'd at Epworth Heights, new equipment is added to give 

the residents of the Home greater opportunities for rest and recreation. 

Vandercook Lake and Cooper Street 

Jackson, Michigan 

Vandercook Lake, Jackson, has been served continually for the past nine 
years by a parish deaconess supported by Michigan Conference. The church 
school, community vacation Bible schools. Junior League, mission study 
classes, home visitation, and social activities have developed Christian leader- 
ship. The Queen Esther Circle has won conference honors for the past 
three years. 



238 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Minnesota 

Girls' Club 

181 West College Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota 
Mrs. K. Elden Gullette, Housemother 

« 
There has been a greater number of permanent members in the Girls' 
Club this year than before. The girls from twenty-seven towns represent 
all walks of life. Ten girls took charge of the chapel services on Sundays. 
Several social affairs have been given for the girls. The inspiration and 
help given by the national officers who have visited our Home have been 
appreciated. 

Missouri 

Oronogo, Missouri 
Bernice Johns, Deaconess 

Our church in Oronogo has the responsibility of bringing Christian in- 
fluence in a community built around the mines. When strikes leave unrest 
and fear, the church must bring assurance and faith. Sunday school, wor- 
ship services, Epworth League, Queen Esthers, the women's organizations, 
midweek services, calling, and recreational programs are among the activi- 
ties through which people are reached. 

Sheffield Neighborhood Center 

Sheffield, Kansas City, Missouri 
Gladys Hobbs, Deaconess 

The deaconess in charge is assisted by students and members of the staff 
from the National Training School. The church school, clubs, community 
night, millinery class, night school, home visitation, and nursery school, 
provide a more wholesome Christian atmosphere for the Mexican, Greek, 
and American families of the neighborhood, and afford the students the 
opportunity of meeting real life situations. With an enrollment of 500, the 
aggregate in all departments for the past year was 12,991. 

Nebraska 

Omaha City Mission 

2201 Cass Street, Omaha, Nebraska 
Alice McCurry, Superintendent 

The Weekday School of Religious Education, the only one in Omaha, 
increased its enrollment and attendance nearly fifty per cent. A worship 
service for young people and adults and a junior church were added to the 
schedule and drew a good response. The Juvenile Court officer commended 
the Omaha City Mission several times during the year for its influence 
in reducing juvenile delinquency in this area, which had formerly provided 
sixty per cent of all juvenile delinquency in the city. 

Newark 

Newark Deaconess Home 

219 Fairmount Avenue, Newark, New Jersey 
Lillian Beidelman, Superintendent 

The deaconesses who live at the Newark Deaconess Home do parish 
work, and much of their work is outside the Home, except when entertaining 



Conference Work. 239 

the various groups of children and young people. The deaconesses render a 
veiy loving and helpful service through visitation in the communities, and 
they assist in meetings and direct the religious education in their churches. 



New England 

Hattie B. Cooper Community Center 

36 Williams Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Frances Barber, Superintendent 

The Center ministers to underprivileged people in the heart of the Negro 
section of the south end of Boston. Total enrollment in the classes — nur- 
sery, kindergarten, religious education, sewing, arts and crafts, kitchen- 
garden, music, vi^omen's clubs — reached 3,681. A fine group had a happy 
and beneficial time at camp during July. 

New England Southern 

Silver Lake Center 

267 Pocasset Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 
Grace PI Yoakum, Superintendent 

Silver Lake, with its Italian population of over 4,000, is a little "Italy" 
in America. The Center provides a religious and social life for these 
Italians. The aggregate monthly attendance last year was 500. There is 
deep interest on the part of many in Bible study and vital questions on 
religion for everyday living. 

New Jersey 

New Jersey Conference Deaconess Home and Community Center 

278 Kaighn Avenue, Camden, New Jersey 
Harriet E. Laney, Superintendent 

Too much in praise cannot be said for the ministry of the four deacon- 
esses in our Community Center in the heart of the foreign section of the 
city of Camden. Through recreational activities, Bible classes, Mothers' 
Club, Queen Esther Circle, nursery school, and sympathetic interest in 
every phase of community activity, they have made themselves an integral 
part of the teeming life about them. 

New York East 

Brooklyn Deaconess Home 

238 President Street, Brooklyn, New York 
Alice I. Leonard, Superintendent 

Nine deaconesses have lived at the Home throughout the year. During 
these troubled times the deaconesses connected with this Home have spent 
much time working with the various welfare agencies in securing home 
relief, old-age pensions, medical care, proper living quarters, and filling 
many other needs. Through the summer months, 159 children have been 
in summer camps through efforts of the deaconesses; 252 have been enrolled 
in the various classes in the industi'ial school, and 70 children were in 
the Vacation Bible School. 



240 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Italian Mission 

Jefferson Park, 407 East 114th Street, New York, New York 

Under the leadership of Rev. and Mrs. Pietro Campo, the work at the 
Italian Mission has gone forward. The day nursery, the kindergarten, 
gymnasium, and clubs for boys and girls are much needed among the thou- 
sands of Italians in that section. The mothers and young children look 
forward each year to the short vacation at Long Branch, where a fresh air 
home is maintained. 



North-East Ohio 

Cleveland Deaconess Home and West Side Community House 

3000 Bridge Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 
Mrs. Luella M. Evelsizer, Superintendent 

Disease, defeat, and delinquency have affected children, young people, and 
adults. In eleven churches calling discloses difficult situations. In organi- 
zation work, children still need to know about God; young people want help 
in solving problems; adults ask for friends and counsel to follow the Way. 
In the neighborhood health services, intei'esting club and classes, spiritual 
guidance, strive to maintain skill and faith. 

Guernsey Valley Parish 
Julia A. Lakey, Deaconess 

Guernsey Valley Larger Parish does a valuable piece of work at Trail 
Run and King's Mine among people whose only touch with the outside 
world is through our organizatoin. The enrollment was 568. 

Holloway Deaconess Home 

303 Howard Avenue, Bridgeport, Ohio 
Mary J. Lockhart, Superintendent 

Holloway Deaconess Home is maintained by both Ohio and West Vir- 
ginia Conferences. Eight deaconesses have lived here and worked in the 
near-by communities. This year the work has gone forward in a fine way. 
The weekday Bible school has proved to be of first importance in the reach- 
ing of large numbers of children who do not go to Sunday school. 

Pearl Street Community House 

334 North Pearl Street, Youngstown, Ohio 
Phoebe Geyer, Superintendent 

The Community House is located in the midst of a large Italian section 
of the city. To build men and women, boys and girls into true Christians, 
better citizens has been the aim of our work. The Queen Esther Circles 
and Home Guards are active groups. The Vacation Bible School was most 
successful this past summer. . 

Rebecca Williams Community House 

1089 Pine Street, Warren, Ohio 
Emily M. Fox, Superintendent 

Two deaconesses and two men working with the boys conduct a com- 
munity program at the Rebecca Williams Community House. The enroll- 
ment last year was G50. The House gives spiritual, mental, and recreational 
training to the foreign-born and Negro people in this steel mill section. 



Conference Work. 241 

North Indiana 

Kate Bilderback Neighborhood House 

2004 John Street, Fort Wayne, Indiana 
Mary Metis, Superintendent 

The Kate Bilderback Neighborhood House is a religious, educational, 
and social center, primarily for foreign-speaking people. We are working 
among the following nationalities: Macedonian, Bulgarian, Greek, Syrian, 
Polish, Italian, Roumanian, Austrian, German, Croatian, and Amei'ican. 
The total attendance for the classes this year was 31,723. One of the new 
activities has been a nursery school for two- and three-year-old children, 
from families of low or uncertain income that need proper food and care. 

Northwest Indiana 

North Haimnond Baby Clinic 

Hammond, Indiana 
Mrs. Louise Fruehling, Superintendent 

In the midst of one of the largest industrial districts, this clinic is open 
to all mothers with children vmder six years of age in all situations of life. 
Besides ministering to the needs of healthy, although sometimes temporarily 
undernourished babies, there has been added the services of a trained and 
experienced young woman, who visits in the homes of the needy, giving the 
mothers spiritual advice, which is so often needed along with the material 
assistance rendered. 

Northwest Iowa 

Shesler Deaconess Home 

1308 Nebraska Street, Sioux City, Iowa 

The personnel of the deaconesses has not changed during the past year. 
They have done fine work. Miss Martha Younglove and Miss Ethel Lehn 
have put on some splendid musical and literary programs at Wall Street 
Mission. Miss Myrtle Beck organized a Queen Esther Circle, something new 
for Helping Pland Mission, and has also introduced many other new fea- 
tures. The Shesler Deaconess Board has carefully looked after the work. 

Shesler Hall 

1308 Nebraska Street, Sioux City, Iowa 
Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson, Matron 

Shesler Hall is a happy home for young business girls who enjoy home 
life in a Christian home. It is filled to its capacity of thirty all the time 
and has a waiting list. Shesler Hall serves the away-from-home girl, and 
is happy for this privilege. 

Harriet Ballou Day Nursery and Wall Street Mission 

312 South Wall Street, Sioux City, Iowa 
Mrs. Leona Austin, Nursery Matron 

A total of 1,547 were enrolled in the classes of the Harriet Ballou Day 
Nursery. Swimming is one important phase of industrial work and over 125 
were taught to swim. Music lessons on the piano and other instruments 
were given to eighty children. Twelve students under twelve now play 
hymns for public services. Over forty children practice at the Mission. 
A new library is serving a need; 5,799 books were checked out its first year. 



242 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Ohio 

Flower Esther Hall 

1324 Superior Street, Toledo, Ohio 
Mrs. J. H. Basden, Superintendent 

Thirty-five girls have lived happily together in this beautiful Home. 
It gives protection and supervision to girls living in the city and away 
from the safety of their own homes. Our aim is to build Christian character 
and to honor our Lord. 

Friendly Center Community House 

1334 Superior Street, Toledo, Ohio 

Friendly Center is located near the downtown section where there is a 
large foreign element, principally Syrians and Greeks. Our work is to be 
a "good neighbor" to these people and help them find Christ. Clubs and 
classes offered to young people of school age include amateur dramatics, 
music, I'adio, hobby classes. The game room is open at all times and a 
splendid library is available. A new gymnasium has made it possible to 
enlarge the program. 

McKelvey Deaconess Home 

72 South Washington Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 
Grace Nettleton, Superintendent 

Four of the workers at the South Side Settlement have lived at the 
Home during the past year. Seven young businesswomen are renting 
rooms in the Home and have appreciated the accommodations in a Chris- 
tian home. Many of the auxiliaries have shown their interest by holding 
one of their regular meetings in the Home and bringing supplies. 

South Side Settlement 

363 Reeb Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 
William Kaufman, Director 

It is the purpose of the Settlement to help people achieve a satisfying, 
purposeful, happy, creative, and healthful life which will be individually 
and socially constructive. Through the many activities, equipment, and 
leadership the Settlement seeks to achieve its objectives. It ascribes to 
the principle that you "learn by doing" and attempts to provide the oppor- 
tunities for the people to participate in group and individual activities 
which make for a Christian personality. 



Oregon 



Methodist Old People's Home 

1625 Center Street, Salem, Oregon 
Beatrice Blatchford, Superintendent 

This Home is a haven of rest for forty-two men and women between 
the ages of seventy and eighty-seven. Kindliness and service express the 
keynote of the Home, and each member tries to create a Christian home 
atmosphere. It is truly a house of happiness. Members express deep appre- 
ciation of the daily half-hour vesper service. 



Conference Work. 243 

Pacific Northwest 

Japanese Methodist Mission 

Spokane, Washington 
Rev. S. Neiva 

The outstanding feature of the year at the Japanese Mission was the 
celebration of the thirty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the church. 
The greater part of the work of the Mission is carried on for the children 
and young people. The Mission is not a project that has outgrown its 
usefulness, but one which has kept pace with the growing needs of the 
Japanese people and is a vital contribution to their lives. 

Taconia Community House 

1311 South M Street, Tacoma, Washington 
M. Blanche Kinison, Superintendent 

When the doors of the Tacoma Community House opened in the fall to 
begin this year's work, bright-eyed little children, eager boys and girls, 
and earnest men and women came to enroll in the different clubs and classes. 
The Rotary Club of Tacoma promised to give the boys $400 for a needed 
club room if they would raise $100. Under the leadership of their director 
the boys raised $137. English and citizenship classes were held for both 
men and women. A number obtained their papers and will make useful, 
worth-while citizens. 

Wilkeson Community House 

Wilkeson, Washington 
Rev. and Mrs. Wm. F. Haggarty 

The work in the Wilkeson Community House has forged ahead the past 
year as it has upheld the Chi'istian standards in the coal mining section. 
The large mines have been closed two years and the small ones have very 
little work, as there is not much demand for coal. Consequently the ma- 
jority of the men are on WPA. 



Philadelphia 



Philadelphia Deaconess Home and Settlement 

611 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Rena E. Reiser, Superintendent 

The Settlement provides a religious, educational, recreational program 
for all ages. Classes in Americanization, dressmaking, and cooking are 
holding the women, while the gymnasiums, game room, Boy and Girl Scouts, 
Sunday school appeal to the young people. The neighborhood feels the in- 
fluence of the work being done by our workers and responds gratefully to 
the plans that are made for its welfare. Total attendance was 44,747. 

Philadelphia Esther Hall 

2021 Mount Vernon Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Agnes Poticher, Superintendent 

This is indeed a haven for girls desiring a homey place to live. Chris- 
tian fellowship and sympathetic understanding are found here. During 
part of last year we were filled to capacity. 



244 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

"= ^.^ Pittsburgh 

^ Elizabeth A. Bradley Children's Home 

214 Hulton Road, Oakmont, Pennsylvania 
Olive M. Morgan, Superintendent 

The superintendent reports a good year, a good garden v^rith many jars 
of good things put away for the winter, the twenty-three children all well 
cared for and remarkably well. Many things have happened to make them 
happy: a trip to the airport, a picnic away from home with a train ride, 
the visit of a real magician, and other lovely things. Everyone was pro- 
moted in school. Mrs. Srodes, of the Morals Court, helps to investigate 
applications, and Miss Mabel Whited helps with the children's musical in- 
struction. 

Louise Home for Babies 

South Aiken Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

This Home for little children up to four or five years of age is maintained 
by a group of women in Christ Church. They report a good year, twenty- 
four children in the Home, and a welcome legacy this last year from one 
of the board membei's who had been interested for many years. 

Morals Court 
Mrs. Eleanor H. Srodes, Worker 

This work continues to be a challenging opportunity for real home 
missionary service. After conducting a thorough investigation of the Court, 
Mayor Scully of Pittsburgh said: "Crime prevention is a wider field of 
public welfare than the confinement of men, women, and children in places 
of restraint. I find the workers there not merely social woi-kers in the 
usual meaning of the term; they are representatives of the churches dedi- 
cated to the preservation of human values and the salvage of human ma- 
terial." 

Neighborhood Center 

714 Foreland Street, Pittsburgh, N. S., Pennsylvania 
Ruth E. Wheatley, Superintendent 

Under the able and gracious guidance of our new superintendent. Neigh- 
borhood Center has continued to justify its name in the fine program of 
clubs, classes, Sunday school, and Daily Vacation Bible School it has main- 
tained this year, not only for the children, but also for the fathers and 
mothers of the "Neighborhood." The work of the Parent-Teacher group 
has been outstanding. 

Pittsburgh Deaconess Home 

2000 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Mrs. Frederick Spielman, Superintendent 

Two deaconesses work at the Neighborhood Center, two at the Good- 
will Industries, five are engaged in parish work, two care for the kinder- 
garten and settlement work at the Home, and two do field work. During 
the summer more than seven hundred children were taught by our dea- 
conesses in six Daily Vacation Bible Schools. Throughout last winter over 
five hundred were enrolled in various classes at the Deaconess Home, this 
number including representatives of thirteen nationalities. 

Travelers' Aid 

The work of the Travelers' Aid Society was begun by the organization 
in Pittsburgh, and the early station workers were all deaconesses. The 



Conference Work. 245 

conference society is still affiliated with this work and still carries a finan- 
cial obligation toward it. During the past year the report includes over 
eight thousand contacts with runaways, unmarried mothers, those physi- 
cally handicapped, and those needing lodging, transportation, and other 
kinds of travel assistance. 

Rock River 

Bohemian Church 

19th and Fiske Streets, Chicago, Illinois 
Anna Sterba, Worker 

The work at the Bohemian Church has gone on as usual, steadily and 
with a fine healthy Christian everyday program. Our worker. Miss Sterba, 
was obliged to take a six-months' rest, but Miss Anna Kastanak filled in 
the gap until Miss Sterba's return at the beginning of the Daily Vacation 
Bible School. 

Esther Hall 

537 Melrose Street, Chicago, Illinois 
Marietta Eckerman, Superintendent 

Esther Hall continues to serve the young women of this city by pro- 
viding a home where comfort and happiness are found. The strangeness 
of new things is lessened by the making of new friends; a helping hand 
is given in time of uncertainty. The past year an average of twenty-two 
girls have enjoyed this Christian home at Esther Hall. 

Halsted Street Institutional Church 

1935 Halsted Street, Chicago, Illinois 

The average daily attendance of the Daily Vacation Bible School at 
Halsted Street during the four-week session was 108. The theme was 
"We Need Each Other," and it was the aim to aid the children in realizing 
that each person must share in building a better home, church, commu- 
nity, nation, world. One of the outstanding pieces of work was the building 
of a beautiful worship center. Part of the funds contributed were used to 
help support the fresh air and recreational camp at St. Charles, Illinois. 

Lincoln Street Institutional Church 

South Lincoln Street and Thirty-second Place, Chicago, Illinois 
Alta Wade, Deaconess 

At Lincoln Street Church we have an extensive work with young people 
and children, fifty boys' clubs and fifteen girls' clubs, and one of the largest 
church libi'aries, which is constantly in use. The attendance at the Daily 
Vacation Bible School totaled 2,838, with an enrollment of 205. In this 
enrollment were eighteen nationalities. 

Southern California 

David and Margaret Home for Children 

La Verne, Calfornia 
W. D. Michener, Superintendent 

Despite the steady influx of indigents from other states and our con- 
stantly shifting population, we have had only thirty-three changes in our 
family, enabling us to do more effective constructive w^ork than usual. One 
hundred and nineteen different children were cared for, and twenty-six were 
received into the church. For the seventh consecutive year our health 
record topped the entire State. The Home will be under control of the 
national Society the coming year. 



246 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Esther Hall 

2580 C Street, San Diego, California 
Mrs. Clara B. Butler, Superintendent 

The past year has been a busy one meeting the needs of the twenty-five 
teen-age girls, most of them with no other place to call home. Our Esther 
Hall ministers to more high-school girls who come from broken homes than 
to older girls. We have also girls in college and vocational schools who 
feel the friendly atmosphere and warm interest when they come home at 
night, no longer to an empty room but to a family. We cannot say how 
much good the Esther Hall has done this past year, but we know each girl 
is bigger and finer for having lived here. The Home has been transferred 
to the national Society. 

Methodist Hospital of Southern California 

2826 South Hope Street, Los Angeles, California 
Mary K. West, Superintendent 

The Methodist Hospital of Southern California exists to serve the com- 
munity in which it operates. It is organized as a charitable, non-profit cor- 
poration. Bed capacity is eighty; bassinets, forty. The aim is to care for 
the sick, regardless of class, creed, or color. During the calendar year 
1937 the total number admitted was 6,790. 

Southerii Illinois 

Holden Hospital 

Carbondale, Illinois 
Mattie Pangborn, Superintendent 

Holden Hospital, owned and operated by Southern Illinois Conference 
since 1916, gives Christian medical, surgical, and nursing care to the sick. 
It has a fifty bed capacity. A deaconess gives her mornings to visiting 
hospital patients. 

Southwest Kansas 

Deaconess Home and Esther Hall 

1002 South Broadway, Wichita, Kansas 
Florence Garwood, Superintendent 

This year nine deaconesses are members of this conference, though 
most of them do not live in the Home owing to duties elsewhere. The out- 
standing event of our year has been the purchase of a lovely new home on 
South Broadway, all paid for with funds saved and invested by the Dea- 
coness Home Board to be used in purchasing a new building. In it we 
have a capacity for twenty girls, and our wish is that through the years a 
beautiful service may be rendered to young women coming to Wichita seek- 
ing employment or to attend some of our schools. 

Mexican Mission 

Lyons, Kansas 
Rev. J, S. Valenzuela, Pastor 

The pastor at this Mexican Mission says: "We are dealing now with 
children born in this country who attend public school every day. In no 
other place in the Southwest Kansas Conference are the Mexicans so well 
settled as here, where they have permanent work in the two salt mines 
and where the community is not of a migratory character. 



Conference Work. 247 

Mexican Mission 

Wichita, Kansas 
Rev. J. E. Angulo, Pastor 

The Woman's Home Missionary Society of Southwest Kansas gives to 
the Woman's Department of the Federal Council of Churches five hundred 
dollars for the support of the Mexican work in the city of Wichita. Be- 
sides the regular Sunday services, a Daily Vacation Bible School, leadership 
training classes, midweek services, and a recreational night all help to hold 
the interest of the more than three hundred persons to whom this Mission 
is ministering. 



Upper Iowa 



John Huss Methodist Episcopal Church 

First Street and Fourteenth Avenue, S. W., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
V. C. Grant, Pastor 

The Front Rows Club, composed of junior high and high-school young 
people, has a membership of fifty. Their regular attendance to the church 
services has meant much, as they have taken their pledge seriously. Their 
pledge: "I pledge my allegiance to the membership of the Front Row 
Club and to the purpose for which it stands; to create and maintain a spirit 
of fellowship by making my appearance in the front rows of my church 
for each morning worship service." 



West Virginia 

Engle Settlement House 

137 Maple Avenue, Fairmont, West Virginia 
Rebecca Moddelmog, Superintendent 

Two missionaries have carried on the work in nearby mining commu- 
nities. These workers have assisted also in the work of the various churches. 
They have been especially helpful with the young people and children in 
the underprivileged homes. 

Holloway Deaconess Home 

303 Howard Street, Bridgeport, Ohio 
Mary J. Lockhart, Superintendent 

Holloway Deaconess Home is maintained by both West Virginia and 
Ohio Conferences. Eight deaconesses have lived here and worked in the 
nearby communities. This year the work has gone forward in a fine way. 
The weekday Bible school has proved to be of first importance in the 
reaching of large numbers of children who do not go to Sunday school. 

Minnie Nay Settlement House 

43 Marshall Street, Benwood, West Virginia 
Sophia Fetzer, Superintendent 

Two deaconesses keep very busy with the many duties at this settle- 
ment. Many classes are conducted throughout the winter. The Queen 
Esther Circle is a very active group. This summer the deaconesses spon- 
sored a large Vacation Bible School, which is their usual custom. They 
have Sunday school every Sunday afternoon. 



\i 



248 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Scott's Run Settlement House 

R. F. D. No. 7, Morgantown, West Virginia 
Luella Didget, Superintendent 

One deaconess has carried on the work in this difficult field with help 
only part of the time. She has accomplished more than seemed possible. 
She and her helpers have been a great comfort to the people in this mining 
community. The coming of a liquor store has made the work doubly hard. 

^^ West Wisconsin 

Italian Methodist Church 

103 S. Lake Street, Madison, Wisconsin 
Carrie E. Adams, Deaconess 

The work of the Italian Methodist Church is carried on under the leader- 
ship of the pastor, Rev. Antonio Parroni, and the deaconess. The church^ 
was founded in 1922, and has a membership of two hundred and fifty; 
the Sunday-school enrollment, one hundred and seventy. One hundred and 
ten attended the Daily Vacation Bible School. Regular church services, 
Sunday school, Epworth League, and midweek prayer services, summer 
camp, clubs. Queen Esther Circle, choir, and orchesti'a are some of the 
activities. ' 

Wilmington 

Mary Todd Gaml>rill Neighborhood House 

400 S. Heald Street, Wilmington, Delaware 

In a closely populated district of many nationalities this Home spon- 
sors a varied program, kindergarten to the mothers' clubs and classes 
for the Negro children. One deaconess has carried on this full and active 
program the past year, and we feel that the kingdom of God has been ad- 
vanced through this Home. 

Riddle Memorial Deaconess Home 

307 West Street, Wilmington, Delaware 

Into the Riddle Memorial Deaconess Home come all ages and classes 
whose lives are being enriched in the service rendered by the two deaconesses 
who administer so faithfully here. Of great interest to many has been a 
kindergarten band of about twenty little children, so much is being taught 
through music. A housemother and four deaconesses comprise this family. 



Wyoming 



Wyoming Conference Children's Home 

Binghamton, New York 
Rev. and Mrs. Esdras Lowrey, Superintendents 

The Children's Home of Wyoming Conference gives sixty unfortunate 
children a happy home, serves them willingly, cheerfully, and well. There 
are two unusually well-appointed buildings — the one has dormitories, play- 
rooms, living rooms, dining room, and kitchen; in the other a nursery is 
provided on the first floor and a small hospital on the second. Large 
grounds surround the buildings, those in the rear providing space for the 
boys to grow enough vegetables for summer use. The home is fortunate 
to have the donated services of a fine physician. 



CONSTITUTION 

OF 

The Woman's Home Missionary Society 

OF THE 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



Adopted by the General Conference of 1900 
With Changes as Authorized Later by the Board of Managers 



ARTICLE L— Name 
This organization shall be known as "The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society o£ the Methodist Episcopal Church." 

ARTICLE II —Object 
The object of this Society shall be to enlist and organize Christian women 
and young people in behalf of the needy, without distinction of race, and to co- 
operate with other societies and agencies in Educational, Missionary, and 
Deaconess work throughout the United States and its territories. 

ARTICLE III.— Organization 
This organization shall consist of the Board of Managers, Board of 
Trustees, Departments, Bureaus, Standing Committees, Conference, District, 
and Auxiliary Societies, as laid down in subsequent Articles and in the By- 

ARTICLE IV.— Incorporation 
This Society shall be incorporated under the laws of the State of Ohio. 
The headquarters of the Society shall be in the city of Cincinnati. 

ARTICLE v.— Officers 

The officers of the Society shall be a President, one or more Vice-Presi- 
dents as provided in the By-Laws, a Corresponding Secretary, a Recording 
Secretary, and a Treasurer. 

ARTICLE VI.— Board of Managers 
Sec. 1. (a) The meeting of the Board of Managers shall be held annually 
unless otherwise provided. The Board of Managers shall consist of the 
Board of Trustees and such of the following persons, as shall be in attendance 
at the meeting. 

(b) Officers Emeritus, Department Secretaries, Bureau Secretaries, 
Chairmen of Standing Committees, the members of the standing commit- 
tee of Finance Methods, Promotional Workers, the Editors and Assistant 
Editor of Woman's Home Missions, Junior Neighbors, and Junior Publica- 
tions, Annual Meeting Daily, Annual Report, and General Publications, 
the Publisher, and such other proportionate Conference representation as 
is indicated in the By-laws. 

ARTICLE VII.— Trustees 
Sec. 1. The Board of Trustees shall consist of the officers of the Society 
and such additional trustees as may be provided in the By-laws, elected by 
the Board of Managers. 

Sec. 2. Vacancies in the Board of Trustees shall be filled by the Board, 
except when the vacancy occurs within three months of the meeting of the 
Board of Managers. 

249 



250 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Sec. 3. Meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held in January, 
April, and in connection with the meetings of the Board of Managers. Special 
executive meetings may be held at the call of the President and Recording 
Secretary. A majority shall constitute a quorum. 

Sec. 4. The duties of the Board of Trustees shall be: 

(a) To execute all orders of the Board of Managers. 

(b) To administer all the aflfairs of the Society between the sessions of 
the Board of Managers. 

(c) To make appropriations for the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE VIII.— Annual Meeting 
The work of the Annual Meeting shall be: 

(a) To take into consideration the needs of the entire territory; to de- 
termine fields of labor; to consider for approval or revision appropriations 
made by the Board of Trustees. 

(b) To receive the reports of Corresponding Secretary and Treasurer, 
Secretaries of Departments and Bureaus, and Chairmen of Standing Com- 
mittees. 

(c) To elect the Board of Trustees and other officers of the Society. 

(d) To transact any other business that the interests of the Society 
may demand. 

ARTICLE IX. — Duties of Officers 
The duties of President, Vice-Presidents, Secretaries, and Treasurer 
shall be those which usually devolve upon such officers, and any others set 
forth in the By-Laws of this Society. 

ARTICLE X.— Membership 
Adult membership in this Society shall be active, honorary, perpetual, 
memorial, and conference as provided in the By-Laws. There shall be active 
and life membership in the Young People's and Junior Departments as pro- 
vided in the By-Laws. 

ARTICLE XI. — Relation to Other Branches of Church Work 

Sec. L This Society shall engage in educational, missionary, and dea- 
coness work in our own land, and in such of its possessions as are administered 
as Home Missionary Fields, and shall work in harmony with the other con- 
nectional societies of the church. 

Sec. 2. The missionaries and deaconesses supported by The Woman's 
Home Missionary Society shall serve under the direction of this Society 
and be subject to its rules. 

Sec. 3. The funds of The Woman's Home Missionary Society shall be 
raised by securing annual, life, honorary, and perpetual members; by gifts, 
annuities, bequests, and devises; and by collections in audiences convened 
in the interest of the Society. The amounts so collected shall be reported 
to the Annual Conferences through the preachers in charge, in order that 
they may be entered among the benevolence collections and published in the 
Annual and General Minutes. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Man- 
agers of The Woman's Home Missionary Society, which determines its work 
for the ensuing year, shall be so arranged that its fields of labor, its general 
plan of work, and its appropriations may be submitted to the Board of Home 
Missions and Church Extension of the Methodist Episcopal Church for 
approval at its Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE XII.— Amendments 
This Constitution may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Managers by a two-thirds vote of the members present and voting, said 
amendment having been presented to the Recording Secretary prior to the 
April meeting of the Board of Trustees, and having been published three 
times in Woman's Home Missions prior to the meeting of the Board of Man- 
agers. Article XI may not be amended except to conform to action of the 
General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



National Constitution. 251 

BY-LAWS OF THE WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY 

ORGANIZATION 

ARTICLE I— Membership 

Sec. 1. The payment of one dollar annually to the General Fund shall 
constitute regular membership in this Society. The payment of one dollar 
annually to the General Fund shall constitute Young Woman's Auxiliary 
membership in this Society. The payment of one dollar annually into the 
General Fund by the Wesleyan Service Guild from each two dollars of Wes- 
leyan Service Guild membership, shall constitute membership in this Society. 
The payment of fifty cents annually to the General Fund shall constitute 
Queen Esther Circle membership in this Society. In addition to this, each 
auxiliary and Young Woman's Auxiliary shall pay twenty cents per regular 
member, the Wesleyan Service Guild fifteen cents per member, and each 
Queen Esther Circle ten cents per member as contingent fund. The payment 
of twenty-five cents annually to the General Fund shall constitute Home 
Guards membership. The payment of ten cents annually to the General Fund 
shall constitute Mothers' Jewels membership. 

Sec. 2. The payment of one dollar annually to the General Fund shall 
constitute Honorary Membership for a man. These contributions shall be 
applied to the salaries of men who are missionaries of The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society. 

Sec. 3. The payment of fifty dollars at one time into the Perpetual 
Membership Fund shall constitute a Perpetual Membership. 

Sec. 4. The payment of one dollar annually for a deceased friend shall 
constitute a memorial membership. 

Sec. 5. The payment of one dollar annually shall constitute conference 
membership in churches having no auxiliary. 

Sec. 6. (a) The payment of fifteen dollars at one time into the General 
Fund shall constitute Queen Esther Life Membership. The payment of ten 
dollars at one time into the General Fund shall constitute Junior Life Member- 
ship. The payment of one dollar at one time into the General Fund shall 
constitute Jewel Life Membership. 

(b) Life membership in any of the foregoing classes is an honorary dis- 
tinction and not a substitute for the payment of annual membership. 

ARTICLE II— Board of Managers 

Sec. L (a) The Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers shall convene 
on the second Wednesday of October unless otherwise ordered by the Board 
of Trustees. 

(b) A Committee, appointed by the Board of Trustees, shall prepare 
the program and the order of business. 

Sec. 2. (a) Each Conference sending delegates to the Annual Meeting of 
the Board of Managers shall pay to the Committee on Arrangements for 
Entertainment, ten dollars for each ex-officio member and delegate, the money 
to be sent to the local Committee with the names of the delegation. 

(b) The expenses of the entertainment of Officers-Emeritus, Board of 
Trustees, Department Secretaries, Bureau Secretaries, Promotional Workers, 
Chairmen of Standing Committees of the Board of Managers, the mem- 
bers of the standing committee of Finance Methods, Editors and Assistant 
Editor of Woman's Home Missions, Junior Neighbors, and Junior Publica- 
tions, Annual Meeting Daily, Annual Report, and General Publications, 
Publisher, Missionaries and Deaconesses, and invited speakers on the program, 
shall be met by those entertaining the convention. 

ARTICLE III — Conference Representation 
Sec. L Conference representation at the regular meeting of the Board 
of Managers shall be based on adult membership in the auxiliaries, young 
woman's auxiliaries, and Wesleyan Service Guilds as shown in the report of 
the National Corresponding Secretary in the last printed Annual Report. 
Conferences shall be divided into five classes as follows: 



252 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

1. Those with membership of not over 500 are entitled to two repre- 
sentatives. 

2. Those with membership of over 500 and not over 2,000 are entitled 
to three representatives. 

3. Those with membership of over 2,000 and not over 3,500 are entitled 
to four representatives. 

4. Those with membership of over 3,500 and not over 5,000 are entitled 
to five representatives. 

5. Those with membership of over 5,000 are entitled to six repre- 
sentatives. 

Sec. 2. Conference representation shall include at least one of the 
following conference officers, viz.: President, Corresponding Secretary, 
Treasurer, Young People's Secretary, or Junior Secretary, the choice to be 
left to the conference. 

ARTICLE IV — Officers and Board of Trustees 
Sec. 1. There shall be five Vice-Presidents who shall be respectively: 

First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Vice-President. 

Sec. 2. There shall be fourteen members of the Board of Trustees in 

addition to the officers. 

ARTICLE V. — Duties of Officers 

Sec. L The duties of officers shall be such as usually devolve upon such 
officers, in addition to the duty and authority specified in the succeeding 
sections of the By-Laws. 

Sec. 2. In case of the death or disability of the President, the First 
Vice-President shall perform the duties of the President, and a similar rule 
shall apply in rotation. 

Sec. 3. The President or one of the Vice-Presidents, or a substitute from 
the membership of the Business Committee, appointed by the Board of 
Trustees, with the Recording Secretary or Treasurer, shall be empowered 
to sign, for the Society, and in its name, deeds and contracts, which have 
been previously authorized by the Board of Trustees, and to affix the corporate 
seal of the Society wherever requisite and proper. 

Sec. 4. The duties of the Corresponding Secretary shall be to make her- 
self acquainted with the needs and opportunities of the mission fields; to cor- 
respond with Bureau and Conference Secretaries, and to secure from them 
such details of work as may be necessary to make regular reports to the 
Board of Trustees, and annual reports to the Board of Managers, and to direct 
the promotional work. 

Sec. 5. The Recording Secretary shall keep the records of the meetings 
of the Board of Trustees and of the Board of Managers; notify each member 
of the Board of Trustees of the time and place of all meetings, regular and 
special; give to the Board of Managers at its meeting a summary of such 
transactions of the Board of Trustees as have not previously been presented; 
give, through Woman's Home Missions and the church papers, a condensed 
report of such proceedings of the Board of Trustees as are of interest to the 
Society or to the general public; send out advance press notices of the meet- 
ing of the Board of Managers; and notify all persons of action relating to their 
work taken by the Board of Managers or the Boord of Trustees, unless pro- 
vision for such notification is otherwise made; and shall send notices to 
Woman's Home Missions of all proposed changes in the Constitution (for 
three insertions). She shall also act in conjunction with the President, or a 
substitute, as noted in Section 2. 

Sec. 6. (a) The Treasurer shall keep an account of the receipts and dis- 
bursements of the Society, make a report of the same at the meetings of the 
Board of Managers, and a statement at each regular meeting of the Board 
of Trustees. She shall pay the appropriations made by the Board of Trustees, 
and such bills as the Board of Trustees may approve. The accounts shall be 
audited by an auditor appointed by the Board of Trustees. 

(b) The Treasurer is empowered to sign all vouchers for money received 
by way of legacy, annuity gift, or otherwise; to sign annuity contracts and 
promissory notes of the Society; to cancel and assign mortgages; to sell, assign, 
and execute transfers of stocks, stock scrip, or stock subscription rights, bonds, 



National By-Laws. 253 

land trust certificates, Powers of Attorney or of substitution and/or other 
securities standing in the name of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church without obtaining any further or specific 
approval of the Board of Trustees in any particular instance; and in her dis- 
cretion to deposit stocks and bonds with protective committees and execute 
such agreements and assignments relating thereto as may be proper and neces- 
sary; and, with the approval of the Attorney of the Society, to execute waivers, 
entries of appearance and release, in all matters relating to probate or surrogate 
proceedings in any court pertaining to the collection of bequest and devise 
and to afiix the corporate seal to any of the foregoing documents where 
requisite and proper. 

ARTICLE VI.— Elections 

Sec. 1. On the morning of election, or earlier, printed instructions shall 
be given to each member of the Board of Managers. 

Sec. 2. The Board of Trustees shall be nominated by ballot and elected 
by ballot. Only women who have had training and experience in the work 
of this Society shall be candidates for these offices. 

Sec. 3. The five Vice-Presidents shall be, respectively, a First, Second, 
Third, Fourth, and Fifth Vice-President, and each one shall be elected by 
separate ballot. 

Sec. 4. Honorary Vice-Presidents shall be elected by acclamation by 
the Board of Managers on nomination by the Board of Trustees. They shall 
be entitled to all privileges of the body except the vote. 

Sec. 5. Department Secretaries (with the exception of Young People and 
Junior Departments), Bureau Secretaries, the Chairmen of Standing Commit- 
tees, Promotional VVorkers, the Editors and Assistant Editor of Woman's 
Home Missions, Junior Neighbors, and Junior Publications, Annual Report, 
and General Publications, and the Publisher shall be nominated by the Board 
of Trustees and elected by the Board of Managers. Vacancies shall be filled 
by the Board of Trustees. When the interest of the work demands, the 
Board of Trustees shall be authorized to make such changes in administration 
as may be necessary. 

Sec. 6. No person shall hold more than one National office or more 
than one Conference oflRce (and not both) which is filled by election of Board 
of Managers or a Conference Annual Meeting. 

ARTICLE VII.— Finance 

Sec. 1. (a) The fiscal year of The Woman's Home Missionary Society 
shall end the 31st of July, and the books of the National Treasurer shall 
close on that date. 

(b) Conference treasurers shall close their books for the fiscal year on 
July 20, district treasurers on July 10, and auxiliary treasurers July 1, after 
which date all money received shall be included in next year's account. 

Sec. 2. For the Perpetual Members of each conference, the National 
Treasurer shall retain the payments, sending a receipt for same to the Confer- 
ence Treasurer. 

Sec. 3. (a) Unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Trustees, all money 
raised by all organizations of the Society (including bequests) shall be sent 
to the Conference Treasurer, either directly or, if approved by a conference 
annual meeting, upon the recommendation of its Executive Board, through 
District Treasurers. Contingent Funds and Administration or Extension 
Funds will be returned to the Conference Treasurer. The conference treas- 
urers shall close their books on the last day of each month, and shall forward 
at once funds in hand to the National Treasurer, to be disbursed by her on 
the 15th day of each month in accordance with the appropriations made by 
the Board of Trustees. 

(b) Funds held by any of these oflficers shall be deposited in a banking 
institution in the name of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

(c) Money shall not be collected in the name of the Society for any 
special purpose unless such collection has been authorized by the Board of 
Trustees, and the purpose approved; and moneys so collected shall be paid 
into the National Treasury and be regularly appropriated therefrom. 



254 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Sec. 4. In order that the regular appropriations and apportionments 

may be protected, appeals made by Department, Bureau Secretaries and 
Promotional Workers, Missionaries or Deaconesses, either through Woman's 
Home Missions or directly to Auxiliary Societies, must be accompanied with 
instructions that no money be sent in answer thereto without consulting the 
general officers of the Conference. 

Sec. 5. (a) The appropriations and apportionments shall be made by 
the Board of Trustees, and shall not exceed the total available net income of 
the preceding fiscal year. 

(b) Conference apportionments shall be sent by the Apportionment 
Committee to the Conference Treasurer for the approval of the Conference 
Executive Board or the Conference Business Committee. The Conference 
Treasurer, with the assistance of the District Treasurers, shall apportion 
the pledges to the districts within the Conference. The District Treasurer, 
with the assistance of the District Executive Board, shall apportion the pledges 
to the organizations within the district. 

(c) Inasmuch as the finances of the National and Conference organiza- 
tions must be considered by the Board of Trustees at the April meeting, 
following the appropriation by the Treasury Committee in March, all re- 
quests for new or extended National or Conference work shall be submitted 
to the Board of Trustees at the January meeting. 

Sec. 6. In order that the report of the National Treasurer may include 
all amounts received for the work of the Society, money received from be- 
quests by the Treasurer of a Conference Society shall be sent at once to the 
National Treasurer. If the bequest is to be administered by the Conference 
for the work of The Woman's Home Missionary Society, the National Treas- 
urer shall immediately return it to the Treasurer of the Conference Society. 

Sec. 7. (a) Thank-ofTerings shall be applied on Conference apportion- 
ments for salaries and allowances of Missionaries and Deaconesses in National 
Institutions. Surplus of Thank-offering over such salary apportionments 
may be applied through the Conference Treasurer on the payment of other 
pledges to National Institutions, or to salaries for Missionaries or Deaconesses 
in Conference Institutions that have been approved by the Board of Trustees. 

(b) Lenten offerings shall be paid through the regular channels to the 
National Treasurer to be applied to such projects as the Board of Trustees 
may designate. (For 1935-36 the project was the pension for retired mission- 
aries.) 

N. B. — For Mite Boxes, see Finance Methods, Article XII, Sec. 8, page 
259. 

Sec. 8. (a) The approval of the Board of Trustees of this Society, ex- 
pressed in writing and duly certified by the signatures of the President and 
Recording Secretary of said Board, shall be secured before any official of the 

Society or any Auxiliary or Conference organization contract for the purchase, 
transfer, sale or mortgage of property, or undertake any special work in the 
name of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

(b) The erection of a building (National or Conference) shall not be 
begun nor contracted for until at least two-thirds of the building appropria- 
tion is in the National Treasury and authorization to proceed is given by the 
Board of Trustees. 

(c) Authorization for conference building is good for only five years 
except as to plans and contracts in force but not completed. 

(d) Conference missionary work, for which credit for money expended is 
given, shall be entered upon only with the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Sec. 9. All annuity gifts received by a Conference organization shall 
be invested during the life of the annuitant by the Conference Treasurer, 
in consultation with the National Treasurer, and in such investments as are 
authorized by the Board of Trustees and the Attorney; or such Annuity funds 
may be invested by the National Treasurer, in which case the interest will be 
paid by the National Treasurer, and at the death of the annuitant the fund 
shall he returned to the Conference. 

Sec. 10. Funds required for the purchase of linen, silver, and dishes for the 
institutions of the Society must be included in the regular budgets of the 
institutions, be apportioned to the Conference as are salaries, current expense 
and building funds, to be paid through the regular channels of finance to the 



National By-Laws. 255 

National Treasury and disbursed to the Bureau Secretaries of institutions 
to meet requisitions which have been submitted by the Bureau Secretaries 
and approved by the Committee on Treasury and Appropriations. 

ARTICLE VIII. — Publications, Publicity, and Missionary Education 

(a) The Publications, Publicity, and Missionary Education of the So- 
ciety shall include Woman's Home Missions, Junior Neighbors, and Junior 
Publications, Annual Meeting Daily, Annual Report, General Publications 
(Leaflets, Calendar, Study Course, etc.), and Exhibits (Slides, Charts, Posters, 
etc.). 

(b) A committee on Publications of three members shall be appointed by 
the Board of Trustees to consult and advise with the staff. 

(c) A committee on literature of three members shall be appointed by 
the Board of Trustees, to whom the Editors shall submit all manuscripts of 
leaflets, booklets, etc., for approval before publication. Such publications 
only shall bear the regular imprint of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

(d) These committees shall meet in joint session at least once a year. 

(e) These agencies shall promote the reading and study of Home Mis- 
sionary literature. 

ARTICLE IX. — Administr.\tion 

The work of the Society shall be organized into Departments, Bureaus, 
and Standing Committees, each of which shall have the responsibility in its 
own field, of executing the plans, of applying the funds, and of securing con- 
formity to the rules for work as ordered by the Board of Managers or by the 
Board of Trustees. 

ARTICLE X. — Departments 

Sec. 1. (a) The work of each Department shall be under the care of a 
Department Secretary and Bureau Secretaries as hereinafter provided, and a 
Committee of three which shall include one member of the Board of Trustees 
appointed by the Board of Trustees. The other members shall be nominated 
by the Secretary of the Department and approved by the Board of Trustees. 

(b) The duty of a Secretary of a Department shall be to make herself 
acquainted with the needs and opportunities of the field; to keep in touch 
with the Bureau Secretaries of the Department, and together with them 
administer the affairs of the Department; to secure from them such details 
of their work as may be necessary to make regular reports to the Board of 
Trustees, and annual reports to the Board of Managers, concerning condi- 
tions and needs of the field, and to promote the interests of the Department 
in every possible way. 

(c) It shall be the duty of each Bureau Secretary of a Department to 
supervise the work of her Bureau; to make herself acquainted with its needs 
and opportunities, and to report quarterly or oftener if necessary, to the 
Secretary of the Department, and to the Board of Trustees when requested. 

Sec. 2. List of Departments. 

Junior. 

Wesleyan Service GuiM. 

Young People. 

Sec. 3. Junior. 

The Department of Junior Work shall be under the direction of a Depart- 
ment Secretary, who shall be nominated and elected by the Board of Man- 
agers. Such Bureau Secretaries as are necessary shall be nominated by the 
Board of Trustees and elected by the Board of Managers. 

Sec. 4. Young People. 

The Department of Young People shall be under the direction of a 
Department Secretary, who shall be nominated and elected by the Board of 
Managers. Such Bureau Secretaries as are necessary shall be nominated by 
the Board of Trustees and elected by the Board of NIanagers. 

ARTICLE XL— Bureaus 
Sec. I. (a) The work of each Bureau (not connected with a Department) 
shall be under the care of a Bureau Secretary and a Committee of three. 



256 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

which shall include one member of the Board of Trustees appointed by the 
Board of Trustees. The other members shall be nominated by the Bureau 

Secretary and approved by the Board of Trustees. The Bureau Secretary 
shall be responsible for the care of all buildings and equipment and shall 
report at the regular meetings of the Board of Trustees as requested. 

(b) A member of the Bureau Committee may, at the request of the 
Bureau Secretary, represent the Bureau Secretary, upon the approval of the 
Board of Trustees. 

(c) Funds held by Bureau Secretaries shall be deposited in a banking 
institution in the name of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Bureau Secretaries shall have authority to 
draw checks on the account and to endorse checks for deposit in the account. 

(d) The erection of all buildings shall be under the care of the Bureau 
Secretary and Committee having charge of the work, who, in conjunction 
with the Building Committee of the Board of Trustees, shall determine the 
site, select the plan, let the contracts, supervise the erection, and accept the 
building, subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

(e) The equipment of a building shall be purchased under the direction 
of the Bureau Secretary and Committee in charge, and shall be the property 
of the Society. In January of each year an inventory of equipment and a 
statement of its condition shall be furnished through the Bureau Secretary 
to the Treasury Committee by the President or Superintendent of each 
institution. 

(f) No Bureau Secretary, local board, or superintendent is permitted 
to borrow money without the authority of the Board of Trustees. 

(g) Repairs in excess of one hundred dollars ($100) must have the ap- 
proval of the Board of Trustees. 

(h) An appraisal of all lands and buildings shall be made annually and 
a report sent to the Board of Trustees by the Bureau Secretary at such time 
as may be designated by the Board. 

(i) Each institution shall be under the care of a President or Super- 
intendent, who, together with the other missionaries and associates and as- 
sistants, shall be employed by the Board of Trustees and paid by order of 
the Society upon recommendation of the Bureau Secretary. 

(j) All missionaries shall make, directly or through their Superintendents, 
monthly reports of their work as per blank provided, sending one copy each 
to the Bureau Secretary, National Corresponding Secretary, and National 
Treasurer. 

(k) Since the conversion and spiritual growth of those for whom the 
Society labors is the object of all effort, missionaries are required to work 
diligently and methodically, through family worship, school instruction, per- 
sonal appeal, and social means of grace, endeavoring at all times to develop 
strong Christian character. 

(I) It shall be the aim of our Schools to provide such social and moral 
training as shall tend to make good neighbors and good citizens, including 
a thorough course (approved by the Board of Trustees) in Bible study; in- 
struction concerning missionary and other church organizations; instruction 
in domestic science and arts, in home nursing and gardening and, in institu- 
tions in which the entire educational program is under the Society, a course 
of study which shall conform to the educational standards of the public 
schools of the states in which the institutions are located. 

N. B. — ForLinenandSilverFund,seeFinance Article VII, Sec. 10, page 254 

Sec. 2. List of Bureaus. 

Alaska and the Northwest. 

California and Hawaii. 

Central 

Central West 

n;*., i\/i;oo.;««^ J East Central 

City Missions ^ -n • ji- u 

■' friendship Homes 

North East Central 

West 



National By-Laws. 257 

Hospitals. 

Indian. 

Mexican and the Southwest. 

Mountaineer / Georgia and Tennessee. 

\ Kentucky, Mississippi, and North Carolina. 
Negro 

Puerto Rico and New York. 
Rest Homes. 
The National Training School. 

Sec. 3. Rest Hombs. 

(a) Missionaries or Deaconesses may be admitted to Bancroft-Taylor 
Rest Home, at Ocean Grove, New Jersey; and Robincroft Rest Home, at 
Pasadena, California, upon recommendation of the Committee on Rest 
Homes and approval of the Board of Trustees. The applicant, if accepted, 
shall pay at the rate of $20 per month. 

(b) The Committee on Rest Homes shall prepare an application blank 
for permanent admission to a Rest Home, the replies to which shall be a 
basis for the consideration and decision of the Board of Trustees. 

(c) The Committee on Rest Homes shall decide who may be admitted 
for temporary rest or vacation periods, and determine the rate in each case. 

(d) Upon permanent entrance to a Rest Home the Deaconess or Mission- 
ary shall turn over to the National Treasury of The Woman's Home Mission- 
ary' Society such money or property as may be determined upon by the Board 
of Trustees. The National Treasurer shall pay to the applicants the interest 
on such investments. 

Sec. 4. The National Training School. 

"A committee to take the place of the Bureau Secretary in the reorgan- 
zation of the National Training School was appointed ... to serve as 
Candidate Committee, Curriculum and Faculty Committee, as well as main- 
tain the responsibility and relationship of a Bureau Secretary for the fiscal 
year 1933-34." (From the October 1933 Minutes of the Board of Trustees, 
page 6.) 

ARTICLE XII.— Standing Committees 

Sec. 1. The work of each Committee shall be under the care of a Chair- 
man and a Committee of three, which shall include one member of the Board 
of Trustees, appointed by the Board of Trustees, and two other members 
nominated by the Chairman of the Committee and approved by the Board 
of Trustees. 

List of Standing Committees of the Board of Managers — 

(a) Spiritual Life. 

(b) Citizenship. 

(c) Deaconess. 

(d) Education and Personnel. 

(e) Finance Methods. 

(f) Supplies. 

Sec. 2. The Committee on Spiritual Life. 

(a) There shall be a Standing Committee on the Spiritual Life, whose 
endeavor shall be to quicken the spiritual life among all the groups for whom 
The Woman's Home Missionary Society is responsible, by deepening the 
prayer life and by quickening the sense of responsibility for personal service 
and giving. 

(b) The office and resources of this Committee shall be available to the 
leaders of all groups, including the institutions of the Society. 

Sec. 3. Christian Citizenship. 

The Committee on Christian Citizenship shall promote all good causes 
which come before the citizens of our country, support the enactment of 
remedial legislation, and shall actively oppose such measures as are contrary 
to public welfare. 
Sec. 4. Deaconess Work. 

(a) Deaconess Work shall be under a Secretary, nominated by the 
Board of Trustees and elected by the Board of Managers, and a Committee 
of Three, as provided for in the By-laws governing administration. 



258 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

(b) The duties of the Secretary shall be to keep a complete record of 
the appointments and the educational, health, and efficiency qualifications 
of all Deaconesses of the Society and of candidates for Deaconess work; to 
furnish such information, upon application, to Bureau Secretaries and to 
Conferences; to emphasize "missionary service," working through Conference 
Young People's Secretaries; to visit Training Schools and Institutions, when 
authorized by the Board of Trustees, and to receive and administer the 
Relief Fund. 

(c) The Board of Management of each deaconess institution and each 
deaconess in station shall report annually, or more frequently if required, 
to the Secretary of Deaconess Work; all annual reports to be made for the 
year ending July 31. 

(d) Appointments of deaconesses and probationers to National and Con- 
ference Institutions and to stations to meet the needs of the work shall be 
arranged by the Secretary of Deaconess Work. 

(e) Each deaconess employed in a National or Conference Institution 
or in a station shall make, directly or through her superintendent, reports 
of her work per blank provided, sending one copy to the Bureau Secretary 
having charge of the Institution and one to the Secretary of Deaconess Work. 

(f) A deaconess employed in a National Institution shall be under the 
supervision of the Bureau Secretary for that Institution, who shall be respon- 
sible for the payment of the annual assessment to the Deaconess Emergency 
and Relief Fund. Each Conference Institution or station shall pay to this 
fund an annual assessment for each deaconess employed. 

(g) Deaconesses serving with The Woman's Home Missionary Society 
shall wear the distinctive garb when on duty and shall receive, in addition 
to room and board, the monthly allowance approved by the Society. 

(h) Limited support may be provided in illness if the deaconess entered 
the work under the age of forty years, and has given not less than ten years of 
efficient consecutive service as a deaconess working with The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society, not including the three years of training. This support 
may be provided upon recommendation of the Committee on Pensions and 
Relief and with the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

(i) Each Conference shall provide for each deaconess in Conference 
Institutions or stations in illness or disability for three months after notice 
has been sent to the Committee on Pensions and Relief of such illness or dis- 
ability. 

(j) Necessitous cases shall receive individual attention. 

(k) A copy of the health certificate and credentials for each deaconess in 
National or Conference Institutions or stations shall be secured by the Secre- 
tary of Deaconess Work and filed at headquarters. 

(1) Deaconesses of other forms of administration, when employed by 
The Woman's Home Missionary Society, shall receive the allowance approved 
by the Society. 

Sec. 5. Education and Personnel. 

(a) The Secretary of Education and Personnel shall emphasize "mis- 
sionary service" through the Conference Secretaries of Young People's Work; 
shall be responsible for the recruiting and the guiding of missionary candidates; 
shall receive the credentials of those desiring missionary service, and shall 
present the names of missionaries for enrollment to the Board of Trustees 
for approval; shall make recommendation to the Bureau Secretaries and to 
the Conferences needing workers; and shall visit the National Training School 
and other institutions when authorized by the Board of Trustees. 

(b) In consultation with the Bureau Secretary, faculty of the institu- 
tion, and state officers of education, she shall prepare the curriculum for each 
institution and present it to the Board of Trustees and shall, with the Bureau 
Secretary, seek to maintain the highest educational and religious standards 
in our Homes and Schools. 

Sec. 6. Student Work. 

The Secretary of Student Work with the co-operation of the Secretary 
of Education and Personnel shall seek to interest Methodist women students 
in Home Missions and shall represent the Society in interdenominational 
student work. 



National By-Laws. 259 

Sec. 7. Missionaries. 

(a) A missionary candidate must not be less than twenty years of age; 
must be a member in good standing of some evangelical church, must present 
testimonials of good character; also a certificate of good health signed by a 
registered physician, for which the proper blanks will be supplied; must have 
had the preliminary training of a course in an accredited high school, or its 
academic equivalent, and at least one year of professional training or experi- 
ence (Normal School, Training School, College, practical experience in teach- 
ing) ; and must have her credentials approved by the Secretary of Education 
and Personnel. 

(b) The testimonials and medical blank of a missionary candidate shall 
be considered and passed by the Conference Board of the Conference in which 
she resides. 

(c) A physical examination shall be required of any Missionary who 
has been on leave of absence for nine or more months and wishes to return 
for work in The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

(d) An enrolled missionary is a missionary candidate who has served 
acceptably the probationary period of two years, is a graduate of a College, 
Normal or Training School of recognized standing, or served acceptably 
three years if she has not had this training; and after that has passed a satis- 
factory physical examination by a registered physician, has signed the enroll- 
ment card for missionaries, and has been approved by the Board of Trustees. 

(e) A missionary pin shall be given to enrolled missionaries who accept 
missionary work as a vocation. 

(f) Limited support may be provided in illness for an enrolled missionary 
employed in National or Conference Institutions, upon recommendation of 
the Committee on Pensions and with the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

(g) A missionary shall be retired at the age of seventy years, and upon 
retirement shall receive a pension proportionate to her years of service, in 
accordance with the rules and regulations of the Society governing the dis- 
bursement of pension and relief funds; and may be admitted to a Rest Home 
of The Woman's Home Missionary Society under the rules governing admis- 
sion to such Homes. 

(h) A missionary may be retired at the age of sixty-five years and with 
the approval of the Board of Trustees may be placed in the retired relation, 
provided she has given twenty-five annuity years of efficient service under 
the auspices of the Society, these years of service not to include the years of 
training for service. 

(i) Annual pension equivalent to fifteen dollars per year for each year 
of active service shall be paid upon retirement to each enrolled missionary, 
provided she entered the work before the age of forty years, if recommended 
by the Committee on Pensions and Relief and approved by the Board of 
Trustees. 

(i) Each Conference shall provide for each missionary in Conference 
Institutions in illness or disability for three months after notice has been sent 
to the Committee on Pensions and Relief of such illness or disability. 

(k) Necessitous cases shall receive individual attention. 

(1) A copy of the health certificate and credentials for each missionary 
in National and Conference Institutions shall be secured by the Secretary 
of Education and Personnel and filed at headquarters. 
Sec. 8. Finance Methods. 

A Standing Committee of Finance Methods consisting of four persons 
with the National Treasurer as chairman, shall promote the use of Lenten 
program and the collection of sacrificial gifts; shall present the use of the 
mite box; shall solicit moneys for an endowment fund for the support of re- 
tired missionaries; and shall promote Thank Offering services. 
Sec. 9. Supplies. 

(a) The Committee on Supplies shall supervise the securing and sending 
of clothing, books, and other supplies for the institutions of the Society, and 
for ministers and their families in Home Mission fields who have been ap- 
proved by the Board of Home Missions, after recommendation by District 



260 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Superintendents or Conference executive boards of The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society, of the Conference in which the applicant resides. 

(b) The Bureau Secretaries shall present requisitions for their respective 
institutions to the National Chairman of Supplies by March 1, for the follow- 
ing year. 

(c) Superintendents of institutions, and ministers, shall send to the 
donors a voucher for all supplies received. A reasonable valuation of the 
supplies must accompany the supplies sent. Credit will not be given for 
second-hand articles. 

(d) If auxiliaries have fulfilled their entire supply apportionment and 
desire to send additional supplies to any institution of The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society, they are privileged so to do, after notifying the National 
Chairman of the Committee on Supplies. 

(e) Money expended by auxiliaries for the purchase and transportation 
of supplies must be raised as a special fund, supplies sent prepaid and reported 
through Auxiliary, District, and Conference Secretaries of Supplies to the 
Chairman of the Standing Committee on Supplies. 

(f) All money to be expended on the field shall be sent through the 
regular channels of finance to the National Treasury, shall be designated for 
Supplies, and shall be sent by the National Treasurer to ths Bureau Secre- 
taries having supervision of the institutions for which such funds are desig- 
nated, or to Conference Treasurers when such funds are designated for Con- 
ference Institutions, or to the minister designated by the Auxiliary. 

N. B. — For Silver and Linen Fund, see Finance Article VII, Sec. 10, page 
254. 

ARTICLE XII.— Amendments 
These By-laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board 
of Managers by a two-thirds vote of members present and voting, said amend- 
ment having been previously published three times in Woman's Home Mis- 
sions. 

(b) Changes in the Constitution and By-laws which are verbal, and 
changes in the order of arrangement which do not affect meaning, may be 
made by the Recording Secretary and Board of Trustees. 

(c) When changes in the Constitution or By-laws of The Woman's 
Home Missionary Society affect Conference, District, or any other part of 
the organization of the Society, the Recording Secretary and Board of Trustees 
are authorized to make such changes in those Constitutions or By-laws as 
will harmonize them with that of the general Society. 



BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Sec. 1. Meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be held in January, 
April, and in connection with the meetings of the Board of Managers. Special 
meetings may be held at the call of the President and Recording Secretary. 
A majority shall constitute a quorum. 

Sec. 2. Standing Committees of the Board of Trustees shall be nomi- 
nated by the President, and elected by the Board at the first meeting next 
succeeding the Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers. 

Sec. 3. At the regular meetings of the Board of Trustees, written re- 
ports shall be presented by the Corresponding Secretary, the Treasurer, the 
Secretaries of Departments and Bureaus, and the Chairmen of Standing 
Committees. 

Sec. 4. At its meeting in April the Board of Trustees shall make special 
examination of the work of the missionaries during the past year, and ap- 
pointments for the coming year. 

Sec. 5. The Board of Trustees shall appoint a Business Committee, to 
consist of the President, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, 
Treasurer, and five other members of the Board, with power to transact 
business for the Board in the intervals of the meetings of the Board of Trustees. 
The Business Committee shall meet at the call of the Chairman and Sec- 
retary, sufl[icient previous notice having been given. In case a member of 
the Business Committee is unable to attend a meeting of the Committee, 
the President is authorized to appoint a substitute for that meeting. Any 



Conference Constitution, 261 

member of the Board of Trustees present at a meeting of the Business Com 
mittee shall be ex-officio a member of the Business Committee for that meet- 
ing, with right of vote. This Committee shall report its action at the regular 
meeting of the Board of Trustees next succeeding such action. 

Sec. 6. Bureau Secretaries, Chairmen of Standing Committees, and Cor- 
responding Secretaries of Conference Societies, in attendance upon any 
meeting of the Board of Trustees, shall be entitled to a seat and the privilege 
of discussion. 

Sec. 7. The Order of Business and Rules of Debate shall be as follows: 
(1) Singing, reading of Scriptures, prayer; (2) Reading the minutes of last 
meeting; (3) Reports of the Corresponding Secretary, Treasurer, Secretaries 
of Departments and Bureaus, Standing Committees; (4) Reports of Special 
Committees; (5) Unfinished business. Resolutions for discussion shall be 
presented in writing. 

Sec. 8. There shall be the following Standing Committees: (1) Appor- 
tionments; (2) Building; (3) Business; (4) Conference Representation; (5) 
Co-operation with the Board of Education; (6) Co-operation with the Board 
of Home Missions; (7) Correlation; (8) Council of Women for Home Missions; 
(9) Forward Looking Committee; (10) Interracial Commission; (11) Mary 
Fisk Park Loan Fund; (12) Pensions and Relief; (13) Place of Annual Meeting; 
(14) Policies; (15) Program for Annual Meeting; (16) Schools of Missions; 
(17) Treasury and Appropriations; (18) Woman's Work. 

Sec. 9. There shall be a Forward-Looking Committee of five members, 
of which the Editor and the Corresponding Secretary shall be members, and 
which shall be responsible for the unified plans and programs of the Society. 
The Secretaries of the Young People's Department and of the Junior Depart- 
ment, and the Editor of Junior Publications, shall be associate members, and 
attend the meetings of the committee when summoned. 

Sec. 10. There shall be a Committee on Policies consisting of the Presi- 
dent and the Vice-Presidents to formulate the general policies of the Society, 
both public and organizational. 

Sec. 11. There shall be a Committee on the Mary Fisk Park Loan Fund 
of three members, two of whom shall be the Treasurer and the Secretary of 
Education and Personnel. This is a revolving fund, the purpose of which 
is to assist missionaries and deaconesses to secure additional scholastic train- 
ing to better fit them for the work. A questionnaire will be sent to each 
applicant for a loan. A loan may not exceed $100.00 at any one time. 

Sec. 12. With the consent of the retiring member of the Board of Trus- 
tees her name shall be automatically presented in nomination by the Board 
of Trustees for the position of Honorary Vice-President of the Board of 
Managers. 

Sec. 13. These By-laws may be amended or suspended by a two-thirds 
vote of those present and voting at any regular meeting of the Board of 
Trustees. 

CONSTITUTION FOR CONFERENCE SOCIETIES 
ARTICLE I.— Organization 

A Conference Society shall consist of all the Auxiliary Societies in a 
given Conference, together with a Conference Executive Board. It shall 
take the name of the Conference in which it is located. 

ARTICLE II.— Officers 
The officers of the Conference Society shall be a President, one or more 
Vice-Presidents, a Corresponding Secretary, a Recording Secretary, and a 
Treasurer. These, with Secretaries of Departments as are specified in the 
By-Laws, shall be elected at the Annual Meeting of the Conference Society, 
and hold office until others are chosen. Conference officers or officials serving 
the Conference in any capacity shall reside within the bounds of the Confer- 
ence which they serve. 

ARTICLE III.— Annual Mbeting 
The Annual Meeting of the Conference Society shall be held at the time 
and place determined by the Conference Executive Board, unless determined 
by action of the preceding Conference Annual Meeting. 



262 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE IV.— Executive Board 

Sec. 1. (a) The Executive Board of a Conference Society shall consist 
of the Conference officers, the Secretaries of Standing Committees, the District 
Presidents, Corresponding Secretaries, Treasurers, Secretaries of Young 
People's and Junior Work, Promotional Workers and Conference Field 
Secretaries, Managers residing within the bounds of the Conference including 
National officers, members of the Board of Trustees, Department and Bureau 
Secretaries and Chairmen of Standing Committees; and Superintendents or 
an authorized representative of the Board of Management of Deaconess 
Homes or other authorized institutions of the Society within the bounds of 
the Conference, and a limited number of such other women as the interests 
of the work demand. 

(b) The duties of the Executive Board of the Conference shall be: To 
promote the interests of The Woman's Home Missionary Society within 
the bounds of the Conference; to plan for the organization of Auxiliary, 
Young People's and Junior Societies; to receive reports from all officers 
and committees; and to consider for approval or revision the apportionments 
and appropriations made for the Conference; approve the program for the 
Annual Meeting and anniversary exercises, and transact such other business 
as the interests of the Society may demand, provided its action be in harmony 
with the Constitution of the Society. 

ARTICLE V. — Business Committee 

There shall be a Business Committee composed of the four Conference 
Executive Officers, the Conference Secretary of Young People, the Conference 
Secretary of Junior Work and such other members as shall be elected by 
the Conference Executive Board, provided there shall be a minimum of 
seven members, who shall care for the interests of Conference work in the 
interim of Conference Board meetings, and who may function as Trustees 
unless other provision has been made. 

ARTICLE VI.— Incorporation 

It is recommended that each Conference Society shall be incorporated, 
in order to hold property, receive bequests, etc. (Incorporated Conferences 
have a twofold relationship, viz.: to the law of the Society and to the law of 
the State under which incorporated.) 

ARTICLE VII. — Delegates to Annual Meeting of the Board of 

Managers 

Such officers and delegates as are provided for in the Constitution and 
By-Laws of The Woman's Home Missionary Society shall be entitled to voice 
and vote in the Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers. 

ARTICLE VIII. — Auxiliary Organization 

Five or more women, young women, or children, who shall organize 
under the Constitution and By-Laws and pay their annual fees, thereby 
become a Society auxiliary to the Conference Society. 

ARTICLE IX.— Special Work 
Individuals, auxiliaries, or Conference Societies may, subject to the ap- 
proval of the Conference Board and of the Board of Trustees, raise special 
funds for the purchase of property, for the building or care of Homes, for the 
support of teachers, Deaconesses, or pupils in the schools or Homes of the 
Society. 

ARTICLE X. — Amendments 

This Constitution may be amended only by the Board of Managers 
at its annual meeting, by a two-thirds vote of the members present and voting, 
said amendment having been presented to the Recording Secretary prior 
to the April meeting of the Board of Trustees, having been published three 
times in Woman's Home Missions and three-months' notice having been sent 
to each Conference organization. The provisions for notice and publication 
shall not apply to an amendment, the purpose of which is merely to harmonize 
with Constitution and By-laws of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Conference By-Laws. 263 

BY-LAWS OF CONFERENCE SOCIETIES 

Meetings 

1. The order of business of the Conference Annual Meeting shall be: 
(1) Devotional Exercises; (2) Introduction of Delegates; (3) Appointment 
of Committees; (4) Report of the Treasurer; (5) Report of Corresponding 
Secretary; (6) Reports of District Officers; (7) Reports of Secretaries of 
Departments; (8) Reports of Committees; (9) Unfinished and miscellaneous 
business; (10) Election of Officers, and such Delegates and Alternates to the 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers as are provided for in the National 
By-Laws; (11) Reading of Minutes. 

2. The Conference Executive Board shall meet at the call of the Presi- 
dent and Corresponding Secretary, or upon the call of the Recording Secre- 
tary at the written request of ten members of the Conference Executive Board. 
Regular meetings of the Conference Executive Board may be held at stated 
intervals by vote of the Board. 

Elections 

1. The voting members of the Conference Annual Meetings shall 
consist of one delegate for each 20 members, or fraction thereof, from each 
Auxiliary, Young People's Society, Wesleyan Service Guild, a representative 
from each Home Guard Company, and leader of Mothers' Jewels Band, 
a delegate (who is a member of The Woman's Home Missionary Society) 
from each Deaconess Home or other institution of The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society within the bounds of the Conference, and members of 
the Conference Executive Board. 

2. (a) The four Executive Officers: President, Corresponding Sec- 
retary, Recording Secretary, and Treasurer, the Secretary of the Young 
People's Department, and the Secretary of Junior Wori<, shall be nominated 
and elected by ballot. 

(b) Vacancies occurring in Conference or District Executive Boards ad 
interim may be filled by the Conference Executive Board. 

(c) A Conference Society shall not have salaried officers, except a Con- 
ference Field Secretary, whose salary shall be as provided in the By-Laws of 
the Conference Society. 

3. (a) There shall be the following Chairmen of Standing Committees: 
Spiritual Life, Christian Citizenship, Missionary Education, Supplies, Finance 
Methods (Lenten Offering, Mite Boxes, Permanent Missionary Fund, 
Thank-offering), and such others as the interest of the work may demand. 

(b) These Chairmen of Standing Committees shall be nominated by the 
Business Committee and elected by the Conference Annual Meeting. 

Duties of Officers 

Sec. 1. The duties of the President shall be to preside at all Conference 
meetings, including Executive and Business Committee meetings. She, with 
the Corresponding Secretary, shall be responsible for the program for the 
Annual Conference and ministerial meetings, and shall cooperate in every 
way with all other Conference officers. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-Presidents shall assist the President in every way 
possible and preside in her place as occasion demands. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall carefully prepare and preserve 
the minutes of the Conference, the Executive Committee, and the Business 
Committee; shall send out notices and report items of interest to the press of 
the church and of the Society, unless otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 4. The duties of the Corresponding Secretary shall be to promote 
interest in the work of the Society; to plan for the organization of auxiliary 
societies throughout the Conference; to conduct the correspondence of the 
Society; to make semiannual reports in January and July to the National 
Corresponding Secretary on blanks provided. The annual report shall be in 
the hands of the National Corresponding Secretary before July 31; to at- 
tend the session of the Annual Conference; and to report to the Conference 
Executive Board and to the Annual Meeting of the Conference Society. 

Sec. 5. (a) The duties of the Conference Treasurer shall be to keep an 
account of the receipts and disbursements of the Society and make a report 



264 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

of the same to the Conference Executive Board and to the Conference Annual 
Meeting, She shall close her books on the last day of each month and shall 
forward at once all funds on hand to the National Treasurer, whose books 
are closed on the 12th day of each month. She shall send vouchers to the 
pastors of the Conference if there is no district organization. 

(b) Conference apportionments shall be sent by the Apportionment 
Committee to the Conference Treasurer for the approval of the Conference 
Executive Board or the Conference Business Committee. The Conference 
Treasurer, with the assistance of the District Treasurers, shall apportion the 
pledges to the districts within the Conference. The District Treasurer, with 
the assistance of the District Executive Board, shall apportion the pledges 
to the organizations within the district. 

(c) Conference Treasurers shall close their books for the fiscal year on 
July 20, after which date all money received shall be included in the next 
year's account. All funds shall be in the hands of the national Treasurer 
by July 31. 

(d) Funds held by Conference Treasurers shall be deposited in a banking 
institution under the name of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of that Conference. 

(e) In order that the report of the National Treasurer may include all 
amounts received for the work of the Society, money received from bequests 
by the Treasurer of a Conference Society shall be sent at once to the National 
Treasurer. If the bequest is to be administered by the Conference for the 
work of The Woman's Home Missionary Society, the National Treasurer shall 
immediately return it to the Treasurer of the Conference Society. 

Sec. 6. The Conference Secretaries of Young People's Work shall em- 
phasize "missionary service," working in cooperation with the National 
Secretaries of Deaconess and Missionary Personnel. 

Sec. 7. When Conference Officers attend district meetings upon the 
recommendation of the Conference Business Committee, without being re- 
quested by the district, the travel expenses may be taken from the Conference 
Contingent Fund. 

Finance 

1. All membership fees (including Honorary, Conference, and Wes- 
leyan Service Guild) shall be paid through the regular channel into the 
National Treasury and be regularly apportioned therefrom for such work as 
has been approved by the Board of Trustees. 

2. Unless otherwise ordered by the Board of Trustees, all money raised 
by all organizations of the Society (including bequests) shall be sent to the 
Conference Treasurer, either directly, or if approved by a Conference Annual 
Meeting upon the recommendation of its Executive Board, through the 
District Treasurers. 

3. Money shall not be collected in the name of the Society for any 
special purpose unless such collection has been authorized by the Board of 
Trustees, and the purpose approved; and moneys so collected shall be paid 
into the National Treasury, and be regularly appropriated therefrom. 

4. No work under the auspices of the Conference Society shall be entered 
upon except upon recommendation of the Conference Executive Board, duly 
signed by the four executive officers of the Conference Society and approved 
by the National Board of Trustees. All requests for new or extended National 
or Conference work shall be submitted to the Board of Trustees at the January 
meeting. 

5. The approval of the Board of Trustees of this Society expressed in 
writing and duly certified by the signatures of the President and Recording 
Secretary of said Board shall be secured before any official of the Society 
or any Auxiliary or Conference organization, shall contract for the purchase, 
transfer, sale, or mortgage of property, or undertake any special work in the 
name of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

6. Thank-offerings shall be applied on Conference apportionments 
for salaries and allowances of Missionaries and Deaconesses in National 
Institutions. Surplus of Thank-offering over such salary apportionment 
may be applied through the Conference Treasurer on the payment of other 
pledges to National Institutions, or to salaries for Missionaries or Deaconesses 
in Conference Institutions that have been approved by the Board of Trustees. 



Conference By-Laws. 265 

7. Lenten offerings shall be paid through the regular channels to the 
National Treasurer to be applied to such projects as the Board of Trustees 
may designate. (For 1935-36 the project was the pension for retired missionaries.) 

8. (a) Mite box money raised by Auxiliaries and Young People's Depart- 
ment, if not sent to the National Treasurer as a part of the General Fund, 
shall be applied to meeting the pledges of the National Institutions and 
Conference Institutions that have been approved by the Board of Trustees. 

(b) Surplus of mite-box funds, after payment of National and Conference 
pledges, shall be divided equally between the National and Conference In- 
stitutions. 

(c) Mite box funds raised by the Junior Department shall be applied on 
the apportionments to that department. 

9. In order that the regular appropriations and apportionments may 
be protected, appeals made by Department, Bureau Secretaries and Pro- 
motional Workers, Missionaries or Deaconesses, either through Woman's 
Home Missions or directly to Auxiliary Societies, must be accompanied with 
instructions that no money be sent in answer thereto without consulting the 
Conference Corresponding Secretary and Conference Treasurer. 

10. The Superintendent of each Institution shall send duplicate vouch- 
ers for supplies to the Conference Treasurer and Conference Supply Secretary, 
respectively, for all donations received from any source within her territory, 

11. In order to eliminate voucher credit, all funds used for expense of 
carrying on the work of the Conference shall be sent to the National Treasurer 
who will return the same to the Conference Treasurer to be expended. This 
refers to the contingent fund and any administration or extension funds. 

12. All annuity gifts hereafter received by a Conference organization, 
designated for Conference work, shall be invested during the life of the an- 
nuitant by the Conference Treasurer, in consultation with the National 
Treasurer, and in such investments as are authorized by the Board of Trustees 
and the Attorney; or such funds may be invested by the National Treasurer, 
in which case the interest will be paid by the National Treasurer, and at the 
death of the annuitant the fund shall be returned to the Conference. 

District Organization 

13. As soon as practicable, each District shall be organized into a 
District Society under the Constitution adopted by the Board of Managers. 

Supervision 

14. Conferences and Districts (when organized) shall provide definite 
supervision for the promotion of the work of the Young Women's Auxiliaries, 
this to include visitation, program suggestions, rallies, summer schools, and 
other activities; but all reports shall continue to be sent through the regular 
channels of District and Conference Secretaries to the National Correspond- 
ing Secretary of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Field Secretaries 

15. (a) Conferences so desiring may appoint a Conference Field Sec- 
retary, whose appointment must be confirmed by the Board of Trustees, and 
who shall be under the direction and control of the Conference organization. 

(b) A Conference Field Secretary may be allowed traveling expenses 
and one dollar for each day of actual service, said expenses to be met from 
the Conference Contingent Fund. An itemized bill must be given to the 
Conference Treasurer. 

(c) The accounts of Field Secretaries shall be audited each month by 
an Auditing Committee appointed by the Conference Board for this purpose. 

Missionary Candidates 

16. The testimonials of a missionary candidate shall be considered 
and passed by her Conference Board before they are sent to the Secretary of 
Education and Personnel. 

Reports 

17. Conference Corresponding Secretaries shall send semiannual reports 
January 15th and July 31st, and Treasurers shall close their books at the 
end of each month, and report at once to the National Treasurer, who closes 
her books on the 12th of each month. 



266 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Amendments 

18. These By-laws may be suspended or amended by a two-thirds vote 
of an Annual Meeting, the change being in harmony with the Constitution 
and By-laws of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Note. — In Conferences where the interests of the work or state laws 
demand it, supplementary By-laws may be adopted by the Conference Annual 
Meeting, provided they do not conflict with the spirit of the national Con- 
stitution and By-laws. 

N. B. — "7» each Afimial Conference the Business Committee of The 
Woman s Home Missionary Society shall confer with the Conference Board of 
Hotne Missions and Church Extension in regard to the total Home Missionary 
program within the bounds of the Annual Conference.'' — Methodist Discipline, 
Chapter VI, 1251-3c. 

CONSTITUTION FOR DISTRICT SOCIETIES 

Art. 1. This Society shall be known as the District 

Society of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Art. 2. It shall be the object of this Society to secure an Auxiliary in 
each charge on the District, and to sustain interest in those already organized. 

Art. 3. Every person who is a member of The Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society on the District is a member of the Society. 

Art. 4. The officers of the District Society shall be a President, one or 
more Vice-Presidents, Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, Treas- 
urer, and such Secretaries of Departments as are necessary to the promotion 
of the work. The five general officers, viz.. President, First Vice-President, 
Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, and Treasurer, after having 
been nominated, shall be elected by ballot. These five officers, together with 
such other members as may be necessary to conduct the work, who shall be 
elected by the Annual District Meeting, shall constitute the Business Com- 
mittee of the District. 

Art. 5. The duty of the District President shall be to have general 
supervision of the work in her district. She shall confer and cooperate with 
the Secretary in organizing and visiting the work, preside at the District 
meetings, and endeavor to secure the favor and aid of the District Superintend- 
ent and pastors. She shall report her work to the Secretary of the District. 

Art. 6. The duty of the District Corresponding Secretary shall be to 
cooperate with the President in the organization of Auxiliaries; to corre- 
spond with and visit them; to arrange for public meetings; to send out blanks 
and receive reports; to forward reports by the first of January and July to 
the Corresponding Secretary of the Conference Society; and to secure re- 
ports from Auxiliary Corresponding Secretaries for Conference and District 
Annual Meetings. In the absence of Conference Secretaries of Young People's 
and Junior work, she shall also secure reports from these organizations. 

Art. 7. The Treasurer. In all Conferences having District organiza- 
tions the District Treasurer shall handle all funds. She shall send all money 
to the Conference Treasurer the last of each month. (All District Con- 
tingent and Administration or Extension Funds will be returned to the 
District Treasurer.) She shall disburse the District Contingent Fund upon 
the order of the President and Corresponding Secretary. She shall send 
vouchers to the pastors of the district. 

Art. 8. On or before June 15, there shall be an Annual Meeting for the 
election of officers and the transaction of such other business as may be of 
interest to the Society. Retiring officers shall close and report to the Con- 
ference officers the work of the current year. Incoming officers, upon election, 
become members of the Conference Executive Board, and shall project the 
work for the coming year. 

Art. 9. The President and Corresponding Secretary of each District 
shall be a Committee to arrange for a presentation of the work at camp meet- 
ings and other summer assemblies held within the bounds of the District, 
unless otherwise provided for. In case of their failure to do so, that duty 
shall devolve upon the Conference Executive Board. 

Art. 10. This Constitution may be amended by a two-thirds vote of 
the Annual Meeting of the Conference Society, the change being in harmony 
with the Constitution of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



Auxiliaries and Young Woman's Auxiliaries. 267 

CONSTITUTION FOR 
AUXILIARIES AND YOUNG WOMAN'S AUXILIARIES 

Art. J. This Society shall be called The Woman's or Young Woman's 

Home Missionary Society of Auxiliary to the 

Conference Society of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. 

Art. 2. The object of this Society shall be to interest the women of the 
Church in all missionary needs in our land and enlist their aid in carrying 
out the National program of work. 

Art. 3. The payment of one dollar annually shall constitute Auxiliary 
or Young Woman's Auxiliary membership in this Society. In addition to 
a membership fee, each Auxiliary or Young Woman's Auxiliary shall pay 
twenty cents per member as Contingent Fund. Of this Contingent Fund, 
ten cents shall be sent to the Conference Treasurer, five cents to the District 
Treasurer, and five cents retained for Auxiliary expenses, or ten cents may be 
sent to the District Treasurer and local expenses be otherwise provided for. 

(1) The payment of fifty dollars at one time into the Perpetual Mem- 
bership Fund shall constitute a Perpetual Membership. 

(2) The payment of one dollar annually shall constitute Honorary 
Membership for a man. These honorary fees shall be applied to the salary 
of men who are missionaries of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

(3) The payment of one dollar annually for a deceased friend shall con- 
stitute a Memorial Membership. 

Art. 4. This Constitution may be amended at any regular meeting 
of the Board of Managers by a two-thirds vote of the members present and 
voting, said amendment having been presented to the Recording Secretary 
prior to the April meeting of the Board of Trustees, and having been published 
three times in Woman's Home Missiotis prior to the meeting of the Board of 
Managers. 



BY-LAWS FOR 
AUXILIARIES AND YOUNG WOMAN'S AUXILIARIES 

1. This Society shall be called The Woman's or Young Woman's Home 

Missionary Society of Auxiliary to the Conference 

Society of The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

2. The officers of this Society shall be a President, one or more Vice- 
Presidents, a Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, Treasurer, 
Secretary of Missionary Education, and such other Department Secretaries 
as may be thought advisable, who together shall constitute an Executive 
Committee to administer the affairs of the Society. 

3. Meetings of the Society for business and information shall be held 
monthly. The Anniversary Meeting shall be held on or before June 15, 
when th» annual reports of the Secretary and Treasurer shall be read, and the 
officers for the ensuing year elected. 

4. It shall be the duty of the President to preside at all meetings of 
the Society, and to supervise its general interests. 

5. It shall be the duty of the Vice-President to perform the duty of 
the President in the absence of that oflicer, and to aid in devising means for 
the promotion of the work. 

6. It shall be the duty of the Recording Secretary to keep a record 
of the proceedings of the Society, and provide the pastor with notices of 
meetings. 

7. It shall be the duty of the Corresponding Secretary to conduct 
the correspondence of the Society, to send reports December 15th and June 
15th of the condition and work of the Auxiliary to the District Secretary 
when the District is organized; otherwise to the Conference Secretary, and 
in the absence of such an officer, to the National Corresponding Secretary. 



268 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

It shall also be the duty of the Corresponding Secretary, when no other 
person is appointed, to solicit subscriptions to Woman's Home Missions and 
Junior Neighbors. 

8. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to collect the fees of members 
giving a receipt for the same, to hold in trust the funds of the Society, keeping 
a book account, and to send the same monthly to the Conference Treasurer 
(or the District Treasurer, if the Conference so orders), and in the absence 
of such an officer, to the Treasurer of the National Society. 

9. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of Missionary Education to 
act as agent for Woman's Home Missions and Junior Neighbors; to secure, as 
ordered by the Auxiliary, the textbooks, leaflets, and other general publica- 
tions needed in carrying on the work and programs of the Society. She shall 
study ways and means of promoting the interests of the organization through 
its literature, keeping the Auxiliary informed of timely material for its use. 

She shall report to the Auxiliary as called upon and send an anuual 
report to the Conference (or District) Secretary of Missionary Education 
as desired by those officers. 

10. Order of exercises for monthly meetings (optional) : 

(1) Devotional exercises. 

(2) Reading and approval of minutes. 

(3) Reports from members of work done. 

(4) Report (or statement) of Treasurer in writing. 

(5) Report of Corresponding Secretary. 

(6) Unfinished business. (8) Program. 

(7) Miscellaneous business. (9) Adjournment 

11. Once each quarter, if practicable, a public meeting shall be held, in 
which reports shall be read, addresses given, and every effort made to increase 
the general missionary intelligence and zeal in the special work of this Society. 
There shall be a Standing Program Committee to provide programs of a 
Home Missionary character for the monthly and quarterly meetings. 

12. The Contingent Fund may be provided by assessment or by col- 
lections at the regular meetings, or by any other suitable method devised 
by the Auxiliary. 

13. Each woman connected with this Society shall try to induce others 
to become members, and shall do what she can to add to the general interest, 
remembering in prayer each day the interests of the Society. 

14. These By-Laws may be suspended by a majority vote of the Aux- 
iliary Executive Committee at any regular meeting and amended by a two- 
thirds vote of an Annual Meeting, the change being in harmony with the 
Constitution of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



DEPARTMENT OF YOUNG PEOPLE 

CONSTITUTION 

Art. 1. The Department of Young People shall be under the direction 
of a Department Secretary, who shall be nominated and elected by the Board 
of Managers. Such Bureau Secretaries as are necessary shall be nominated 
by the Board of Trustees and elected by the Board of Managers. 

Art. 2. It shall be the duty of this Department to interest young people 
in the work of The Woman's Home Missionary Society and secure their help 
in carrying it forward. 

Art. 3. (a) The payment of fifty cents annually shall constitute Queen 
Esther membership in this Society. In addition to a membership fee, each 
Queen Esther shall pay ten cents contingent fund, five cents for Confer- 
ence, two and one-half cents District, and two and one-half cents local con- 
tingent. 

(b) The payment of fifteen dollars at one time into the General Fund 
shall constitute Queen Esther Life Membership. Life membership is con- 
sidered an honorary distinction, not a substitute for the payment of dues. 



Young People By-Laws. 269 

(c) The payment of fifty cents annually shall constitute Honorary 
membership for a young man of Queen Esther age; all other men shall pay 
one dollar. 

Art. 4. This Constitution may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Managers by a two-thirds vote of the members present and voting, 
said amendment having been presented to the Recording Secretary prior to 
the April meeting of the Board of Trustees, and having been published three 
times in Woman's Home Missions prior to the meeting of the Board of Man- 
agers. 

BY-LAWS 

1. This Society shall be called the Queen Esther Circle of 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 

2. The object of this organization shall be to interest young people 
in the work of the Society, to learn of the need for Missionary work in our 
country and what is being done ti- meet it, and to raise funds for such work. 

3. The officers of this organization shall be a President, one or more 
Vice-Presidents, a Recording Secretary, a Corresponding Secretary, a Treas- 
urer, a Secretary of Missionary Education, a Secretary of Supplies, a Mite- 
box Secretary, and others as may be desired. 

4. Meetings of this Society shall be held on the 

of each month. The Annual Meeting shall be held on 

or before June 15 of each year, at which time reports shall be made and 
officers elected for the coming year. 

5. The President shall preside at the meetings of the Society, and in 
every way seek to promote its interests. 

6. The Vice-President shall take the place of the President in her ab- 
sence and shall seek to assist her in every way. 

7. The Recording Secretary shall keep a correct list of the members and 
records of the proceedings of the Society, and shall provide the pastor with 
notices of its meetings. 

8. The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct the correspondence of 
the Society and send quarterly or semiannually, as directed, reports of its 
work to the District Secretary of Young People's Work, if there be one; if 
not, to the Conference Secretary of Young People's Work. If there be neither 
District nor Conference Secretary for this department, she shall send such 
reports to the Conference Corresponding Secretary. She shall also notify 
the same officers of changes in the officers of the Society. 

9. The Treasurer shall have charge of all money of the Society. She 
shall collect membership fees and keep a book account of money received and 
disbursed. All money received by her except the Contingent Fund must be 
so sent as to be in the hands of the Conference or District Treasurer if the 
Conference so orders by the first of each month. 

10. The Young People's Societies may designate the field of work to 
which their funds shall be applied, after consultation with the Conference 
and District Secretaries of Young People's Work. 

11. The Vice-President and Director shall be members of the Program 
Committee, and other members may be added. 

12. The Mite Box Secretary shall secure and distribute mite boxes to 
members of the Society and to others, that thus interest may be created 
and the work helped. At a designated meeting the mite boxes shall be opened 
by a committee, of which the Mite Box Secretary shall be Chairman. This 
committee shall report to the Society the amount of money collected, paying 
the same to the Treasurer, and shall also report to the District Mite Box 
Secretary. 

13. The Secretary of Missionary Education shall act as agent for 
Woman's Home Missions and Junior Neighbors; secure, as ordered by the 
Circle, the textbooks, leaflets, and other general publications that are needed 



270 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

iu carrying on the work and programs of the Society. She shall study ways 
and means of promoting the interests of the organization through its litera- 
ture, keeping the Society informed of timely material for its use. 

She shall report to the Circle, as called upon, and send an annual report 
to the Conference (or District) Secretary of Missionary Education at such 
time as may be desired by these officers. 

14. The Secretary of Supplies shall seek to arouse interest in this depart- 
ment by making the members familiar with the needs and calls for such help 
on the frontier and from the homes and schools and Deaconess Work under 
the control of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

15. These By-laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the 
Board of Managers by a two-thirds vote of members present and voting, said 
amendment having been previously published three times in Wotnan's Home 
Missions. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF JUNIOR WORK 

CONSTITUTION 

Art. 1. The Department of Junior Work shall be under the direction of 
a Department Secretary, who shall be nominated and elected by the Boird 
of Managers. Such Bureau Secretaries as> are necessary shall be nominated 
by the Board of Trustees and elected by the Board of Managers. 

Art. 2. It shall be the duty of this Department to interest children 
(under twelve years of age) in the work of The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, and to secure their help in carrying it forward. 

Art. 3. (a) The payment of twenty-five cents annually shall constitute 
Home Guard membership for children from nine to twelve years of age. 

(b) The payment of twenty-five cents annually shall constitute Junior 
Home Guard membership for children from six to nine years of age. 

(c) The payment of ten dollars at one time into the General Fund shall 
constitute Junior Life Membership. 

Art. 4. (a) The payment of ten cents annually shall constitute Mothers' 
Jewels membership for children under six years of age. 

(b) The payment of one dollar at one time into the General Fund shall 
constitute Jewel Life membership. 

Art. 5. This Constitution may be amended at any regular meeting of 
the Board of Managers by a two-thirds vote of the members present and 
voting, said amendment having been presented to the Recording Secretary 
prior to the April meeting of the Board of Trustees, and having been pub- 
lished three times in Woman's Home Missions prior to the meeting of the 
Board of Managers. 

BY-LAWS FOR HOME GUARDS 

1. This organization shall be called the Home Guards of 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

2. The object of the Home Guards shall be to interest the children 
of the church in missionary work in our land and to secure their help in carry- 
ing it forward. 

3. The officers of the Home Guards shall be a Leader, whose duties 
shall be to take charge of and direct its work and plans; a President, one or 
more Vice-Presidents, Recording and Corresponding Secretary, and Treasurer. 

4. The meetings of the Home Guards shall be held on the 

of every month. Order of exercises for regular meetings (optional): Bible 
reading, singing, prayer; reading and approval of minutes; statement of 
Treasurer; report of Corresponding Secretary; reports of Committees; un- 
finished and miscellaneous business; program; home mission study; adjourn- 
ment, followed by i brief social time, if desired, under the direction of the 
Leader. 



Wesleyan Service Constitution. 27 1 

5. The President shall preside at the meetings of the Society under the 
direction of the Leader. 

6. The First Vice-President shall be Chairman of the Program Com- 
mittee, and the others shall be given special work according to local needs. 

7. The Corresponding Secretary, under the supervision of the Leader, 
shall write the letters of the Society, and send its reports to the Conference 
Secretary of Junior Work. 

8. The Recording Secretary shall keep the minutes of the meetings and 
a correct list of the members, and shall give to the pastor and Sunday-school 
Superintendent notices of the meetings of the Society. 

9. The Treasurer, under the direction of the Leader, shall have charge 
of the money of the Society. She shall receive the fees of the members, giving 
receipt therefor, and shall keep a correct record of all money received and paid 
out. She shall send the money for fees and pledges to the Conference Treas- 
urer of the Society (or to the District Treasurer if the Conference so orders). 

10. The Home Guards may raise money by self-denial, by giving, or by 
entertainments that are in harmony with Christian ideals. 

11. The Home Guards may support or help to support pupils in the 
Homes or Schools of The Woman's Home Missionary Society, furnish mission 
supplies, or assist in any department of the work of the Society, following the 
directions of the Conference Secretary of Junior Work. 

12. Mite box funds raised by the Junior Department shall be applied 
on the apportionments of that department. 

13. The Annual Meeting of the Home Guards for reports and election 
of officers shall be held in June. A semiannual election may be held in Novem- 
ber, if desired. 

BY-LAWS FOR MOTHERS' JEWELS 

1. This Society shall be called the Mothers' Jewels of 

Church. 

2. The object of the Mothers' Jewels is to help other children by work- 
ing with The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

3. The Society shall be under the charge of an adult Leader, who shall 
fix the time and place of meetings, and arrange programs for the same. It 
may have a child President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer. 

4. The contributions of the Mothers' Jewels shall be used for the support 
of the Junior Projects of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

5. Membership in Mothers' Jewels may be in the form of enrolled 
members, with or without stated meetings. All funds received from Mothers' 
Jewels shall be sent by the Leader to the District or Conference Treasurer 
(as specified) stating the amount for dues and for other expenses. 



WESLEYAN SERVICE GUILD 

CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I.— Name 

The name of this organization shall be the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

ARTICLE II.— Purpose 

The purpose of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be to interest business 
and professional women in a fourfold program for others and themselves: 

(1) Development of spiritual life. 

(2) Opportunities for world service. 

h) Promotion of Christian citizenship and personal service. 
(4) Provision for social and recreational activities. 

ARTICLE III.— Organization 

Sec. 1. The Wesleyan Service Guild shall be auxiliary to The Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and to The Woman's Home Missionary Society 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



272 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Sec. 2. General supervision of the work of the Guild shall be vested in a 
Central Committee composed as follows: three representatives appointed by 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, three representatives appointed 
by The Woman's Home Missionary Society, and eight or more representatives 
of business or professional women elected by the Central Committee at their 
annual meeting, and reported to the W^oman's Foreign Missionary Society 
and The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Sec. 3. The officers of the Central Committee shall be a Chairman, 
one or more Vice-Chairmen, a Recording Secretary, a Corresponding Sec- 
retary, a Treasurer, and such other officers as the development of the organ- 
ization may require. 

Sec. 4. The Central Committee shall have four Departments: the 
Department of Spiritual Service, the Department of World Service, the 
Department of Christian Citizenship and Personal Service, and the Depart- 
ment of Social and Recreational Activities. There shall be a Department 
Chairman for each Department. 

Sec. 5. There shall be a Secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild elected 
annually by vote of the General Executive of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society and of the Board of Managers of The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, on nomination of the Central Committee. 

Sec. 6. The Secretary of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall act as Chair- 
man of the Central Committee, and shall report semiannually, by July 10 
and January 10, to The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and to The 
Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE IV.— Membership 

The Wesleyan Service Guild welcomes to its membership any business or 

professional woman who is in sympathy with the fourfold purpose of the Guild 

and who will co-operate in carrying out its program of education and activities. 

There shall be four kinds of membership: active, co-operating, associate, 

and permanent. 

Active members shall be those who pay annual dues of $2.50. 
Co-operating members shall be those who are interested, attend, and who 
make some contribution of time, talent, or money. 

Associate members shall be men who pay full dues. 

Permanent membership is intended to honor either the living or the dead. 
It shall consist of a gift of $50 to be sent to the treasurer of the Central Com- 
mittee, divided according to the provisions of the Wesleyan Service Guild 
constitution and paid directly to the national treasurers of the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and The Woman's Home Missionary Society to 
be applied on the salaries of missionaries. This shall constitute a permanent 
membership in the Wesleyan Service Guild at large, but any living person so 
honored who desires to hold active membership in a unit shall pay the regular 
annual dues of her unit. 

ARTICLE v.— Funds 
Sec. 1. The fiscal year of the Wesleyan Service Guild shall be from 
June 1 to June 1. 

Sec. 2. The annual payment of $2.50 provides for: 

Membership dues in The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society $1 GO 
Membership dues in The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 1 00 

Branch Contingent Fund (W. F. M, S.) 10 

Conference Contingent Fund (W. H. M. S.) 10 

District Contingent Fund (W. F. M. S.) 05 

District Contingent Fund (W. H. M. S.) 05 

Wesleyan Service Guild Contingent Fund, Central Committee. 10 
Wesleyan Service Guild Contingent Fund, Local Unit 10 

Total $2 50 

which shall be disbursed as follows: 

$1.15 to The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, and $1.15 to The 
Woman's Home Missionary Society (to be sent through the regular channels 
of each Society). 

10 cents to the Treasurer of the Central Committee. 

10 cents to be retained in the treasury of the local Unit. 



Wesleyan Service Constitution. 273 

Sec. 3. In the matter of undesignated gifts, the funds of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild shall be divided on a basis of 50 per cent for work on the Foreign 
Field and 50 per cent for work in the Home Field, the funds to be credited 
and administered as follows: 

50 per cent credited to and administered by The Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society. 

45 per cent credited to and administered by The Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society. 

5 per cent credited to and administered by the local Unit of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild for the Department of Christian Citizenship and Personal 
Service. 

ARTICLE VI.— Meetings 

The annual meeting of the Central Committee shall be held in June, or 
as soon after the close of the fiscal year as is practicable, and other meetings 
of the Central Committee shall be held at the call of the Chairman or of 
five members of the Central Committee, at such times as are necessary or 
desirable. 

ARTICLE VII.— Amendments 

Amendments not affecting the fundamental meaning of the constitution 
may be made with the approval of the representatives of the two Missionary 
Societies on the Central Committee. All other amendments require the con- 
currence of The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and The Woman's 
Home Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE VIII. — Conference Organization 

Sec. 1. A Wesleyan Service Guild Conference Secretary, preferably a 
Guild or ex-Guild member, shall be nominated by the Units in each Confer- 
ence where there are three or more Units of the Wesleyan Service Guild, and 
the nomination confirmed by the Conference Secretary and Conference 
Treasurer of The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, and by the Confer- 
ence President and the Conference Secretary of The Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society. 

Sec. 2. The Conference Guild Secretary shall promote the work of the 
Guild in her Conference, receive reports from the units, assist in the organiza- 
tion of new Units, and shall report semiannually (December 1 and June 1) 
to the Central Committee and to the Conference Corresponding Secretaries 
of The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and The Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society. She should familiarize herself with the work of The Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society and of The Woman's Home Missionary Society, 
and attend, as far as possible, the District and Conference meetings of these 
Societies and, when practicable, present the interests of the Guild at these 
meetings. 

Sec. 3. Where it is impracticable for the Units of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild to meet and nominate a Guild Conference Secretary, the Conference Cor- 
responding Secretaries of The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and of 
The Woman's Home Missionary Society shall, upon consultation with the 
Units, nominate a Conference Guild Secretary, preferably a Guild or ex- 
Guild member, whose appointment shall be approved by a majority of the 
Guilds within the Conference, and who shall be assisted, whenever necessary, 
by the Conference Corresponding Secretaries of The Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society and of The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

ARTICLE IX. — District Organization 

Sec. L A Wesleyan Service Guild District Secretary, preferably a 
Guild or ex-Guild member, shall be nominated by the Units in Districts 
having three or more Units of the Wesleyan Service Guild; or, in default of 
a meeting of the Units, she may be nominated by the District Corresponding 
Secretaries of The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and of The Woman's 



274 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Home Missionary Society, in consultation with the Units within the district, 
and her election confirmed by a majority of the Units. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the District Guild Secretary to receive 
reports semiannually from the Units; to send a summarized Guild report to 
the Conference Guild Secretary where such an officer exists, otherwise to the 
Corresponding Secretary of the Central Committee; to cooperate in the 
organization of new_ Units; arrange for group or district conferences when 
practicable; familiarize herself with the work of the Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society and of The Woman's Home Missionary Society; attend the 
district meetings of these Societies, and present a report of the Units of the 
Wesleyan Service Guild to each Society. 

PROJECTS AND APPORTIONMENTS 

1. The Wesleyan Service Guild, as such, assume each year definite 
financial responsibility for certain projects, which shall be known as Guild 
Projects. 

2. The Central Committee, in consultation with the National Treasurer 
in The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and with the Treasury and 
Appropriations Committee in The Woman's Home Missionary Society, 
decide what these projects shall be. 

3. The Central Committee make the apportionment of the Guild 
projects by conferences and submit such apportionments to the National 
Treasurers of The Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and of The Woman's 
Home Missionary Society; that the apportionments of the Guild projects be 
then included and designated as such in the total apportionments sent to the 
conferences by the National Treasurers. 

4. In addition to the Guild projects, the units accept a share of the 
apportionments assigned to the conferences for the support of the entire 
work of the two Societies. 

5. The projects assigned to units of the Wesleyan Service Guild by 
the conferences be accepted as a part of the conference budget and be appor- 
tioned to the units, just as other parts of the conference budget are assigned 
to auxiliaries, young people's societies, and other groups within the conference. 

6. Conference secretaries or conference treasurers send complete list 
of conference apportionments given units to the Conference Guild Secretary, 
who will in turn write each unit in her conference confirming such appor- 
tionments and send a copy of these apportionments to the treasurer of the 
Central Committee. 

7. In conferences where there are no Conference Guild Secretaries 
such a list of conference apportionments be sent direct to the Treasurer of 
the Central Committee, who will in turn send a confirmation of total appor- 
tionments to each unit. 



CONSTITUTION FOR LOCAL UNIT 
ARTICLE I 

The local organization shall be designated as a Unit of the Wesleyan 
Service Guild, and shall be subject to the provisions of its constitution. 

ARTICLE II 

The officers of a local Unit shall be: a President, one or more Vice-Presi- 
dents, a Recording Secretary, a Corresponding Secretary, and a Treasurer. 
They shall be elected at the annual meeting of the Unit. 

ARTICLE III 

A local Unit shall have four Departments, each of which shall be under 
the supervision of a department chairman. 

ARTICLE IV 

The officers and department chairmen shall constitute an Executive 
Committee. 



Wcsleyan Service By-Laws. 275 

ARTICLE V 

The collection and disbursement of funds of the local Unit shall be in 
accordance with Articles IV and V of the Wesleyan Service Guild Constitu- 
tion. 



BY-LAWS FOR LOCAL UNIT 
ARTICLE I. — Duties of Officers 

Sec. 1. The President shall have general supervision of the work of 
the Unit, shall appoint the Department Chairmen, and shall preside at the 
meetings. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall, in the absence of the President, as- 
sume her duties. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings 
of each meeting, and shall provide notices for the church bulletin and for 
the press. She shall also keep an accurate list of the members of the Unit, 
including home and business address and telephone. 

Sec. 4. The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct all correspondence 
of the Unit. This correspondence includes filling out and sending, quarterly, 
the Wesleyan Service Guild report blanks to the District Secretaries of The 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and of The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, and to the District or Conference Secretary of the Wesleyan Service 
Guild, where such an officer exists, or to the Corresponding Secretary of the 
Central Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. These blanks must be 
so sent as to be in their hands by the first day of June, September, December, 
and March. She shall notify the three above-named Secretaries of changes 
of officers in the Unit. She shall retain a copy of each report as part of the 
permanent record of the local Unit. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall have charge of all money of the Unit. She 
shall collect membership dues, and shall keep a book account of all money 
received and disbursed. All money received by her, except the Central 
Committee Contingent Fund and the five per cent allowed for the Depart- 
ment of Christian Citizenship and Personal Service of the local Unit and 
certain specified items of supplies, must be so sent, together with the Wes- 
leyan Service Guild Treasurer's report blanks, as to be in the hands of the 
District (or Conference) Treasurer of The Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society and The Woman's Home Missionary Society by the first of each 
month, and at the same time duplicate reports of each must be sent to the 
Treasurer of the Central Committee. Wherever there is a District or Con- 
ference Guild Secretary, the Treasurer of the local Unit shall send a copy of 
her reports through these officers to the Central Committee. 

The ten cents per member Central Committee Contingent Fund shall 
be sent semiannually, by June 1 and December 1, to the Treasurer of the 
Central Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Sec. 6. The Executive Committee shall plan the work of the local 
unit, shall approve all askings for missionary projects, presenting these ask- 
ings for adoption by the unit, and shall promote the interests of the unit 
in harmony with the constitution of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

ARTICLE II. — Departments and Committees 

Sec. L The Department of Spiritual Service shall provide for the 
devotional service at the meetings of the Unit, and shall endeavor by every 
means to promote the spiritual welfare of the members. 

Sec. 2. The Department of World Service shall provide for the educa- 
tional program of the Unit in harmony with the program of The Woman'i 
Foreign Missionary Society and of The Woman's Home Missionary Society, 
and in harmony with the recommendations of the Central Committee. 

Sec. 3. The Department of Christian Citizenship and Personal Service 
shall seek to align business and professional women with all forward non- 
partisan movements for civic, moral, industrial, and social betterment. 



276 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

Sec. 4, The Department of Social and Recreational Activities shall 
provide for the social hour at the meetings, and for such other social and 
recreational activities as are deemed advisable. 

Sec. 5. The Chairmen of the four Departments specified in the Con- 
stitution shall work in harmony with the Chairman of these Departments 
in the Central Committee of the Wesleyan Service Guild. 

Sec. 6. Standing Committees may be appointed as desired, such as 
Membership, Ways and Means, Music, Publicity, etc. 

ARTICLE III 

Sec. 1. There shall be at least nine monthly meetings during the year. 

Sec. 2. The annual meeting of the local Unit shall be held in May, at 
which time annual reports shall be given by officers and department chair- 
men, and officers shall be elected for the ensuing year. 

Note. — (1) Reports of the Wesleyan Service Guild should not be con- 
fused with the reports of auxiliaries and Young Women's Societies of The 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society and of The Woman's Home Missionary 
Society, but should be reported in a separate column for the Guild, under the 
adult department of each Society. 

(2) For officers and department chairmen of the Central Committee 
see current Yearbook. 



FORM OF BEQUEST AND DEVISE 
BEQUEST — {Personal Estate)—! give and bequeath to The 
Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, a corporation under the laws of the State of Ohio, the sum of 

and the receipt of the Treasurer shall be a sufficient 

discharge to my executors for the same. 

DEVISE— {Real Estate)— I give and devise to The Woman's Home 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a corporation 
under the laws of the State of Ohio, the following lands and premises, that is to 

say: to have and to 

hold or dispose of the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Society its suc- 
cessors, and assigns forever. 

NOTK. — Notice should be given promptly to the Corresponding Secretary of the So- 
ciety of all Bequests and Devises. 

Note. — The signature of two reliable disinterested witnesses shall be affixed. 



DONATION 
91.000. 



ANNUITY 

5% 



THE WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

CERTIFICATE OF ANNUITY 
(Insert donor's name.) (Insert residence.) 

of 

having donated the sum of One Thousand Dollars to THE WOMAN'S 
HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH, subject, however, to the payment by said Society of an annuity 
of five per cent per annum on said sum for and during her natural life, which 
donation has been accepted, subject to the condition aforesaid; NOW, THERE- 
FORE, said Society hereby agrees to pay said annuity to the order of said donor 
in semi-annual installments, being the sum of Twenty-five Dollars, payable 
on the first day of January, and a like sum of Twenty-five Dollars, payable 

on the first day of July of each and every year hereafter, so long as the said 

shall live, and after her death said Society shall 

not be subject to any payment on account of said donation 

At the death of the annuitant this Society shall have the immediate right to 
use said donation for any of its purposes. 

3n JSSiineaa ]£Biitveai said Society has caused its corporate name to be here- 
unto subscribed and its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed at the City of Cin- 
cinnati, by Mrs. J. H. Freeman, its Treasurer, thereunto duly authorii.ed this 
day of one thousand nine hundred 



and. 
BY 



CORPORATE 
SEAL. 



THE WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Treasurer. 



NoTB. — Form of Annuity Certificate. The above form is for a donation of $1,000 with 
annuity of five per cent. It can readily be changed either in amount or in the rate per cent, 
or In both, so as to comply with the facts and contract in each case. 

277 



278 The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 

THB WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

The undersigned, a majority of whom are citizens of the State of Ohio, 
desiring to become incorporated under the laws of Ohio, in such cases 
made and provided, do hereby subscribe and acknowledge the following 
Articles of Incorporation : 

First. The name of the corporation shall be "The Woman's rtoME 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church." 

Second. The said corporation shall be located at Cincinnati, Hamilton 
County, Ohio. 

Third. The said corporation is not for profit, but is wholly benevo- 
lent and charitable. 

Fourth. The purpose and objects of the corporation shall be to enlist 
and organize Christian women to labor in behalf of needy and destitute 
women and children in all parts of our country, without distinction of 
race, and to cooperate with the other societies and agencies of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church in educational and missionary work; to employ 
women to work in destitute localities; to instruct the ignorant and un- 
fortunate in the practice of industry and economy, and in the principles 
of sanitary law and morality, and to establish schools and evangelistic 
agencies throughout the United States and Territories. 

Thus done and certified at Cincinnati, Ohio, this 20th day of Novem- 
ber, A. D., 1884. 

Eliza G. Davis, [Seal.] 

Elizabeth Rust, [Seal.] 

E. J. Fowler Willing, [Seal.] 
M. E. Ampt, [Seal.] 

Louisa Hemeseth. [Seal.] 

The Slate of Ohio, Hamilton County, ss.: 

Be it remembered that on the 20lh day of November, 1884, before me 
the subscriber, a Notary Public in and for the County aforesaid, person- 
ally appeared Eliza G. Davis, Elizabeth Rust, E. J. Fowler Willing, 
M. E. Ampt, and Louisa Hemeseth, known to me to be the persons whose 
names are subscribed to the foregoing articles of incorporation, and 
severally acknowledged that they respectively signed and sealed the same 
as their voluntary act and deed for the uses and purposes therein 
mentioned. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and 

affixed my Notarial Seal, the day and year last aforesaid. 

Wm. J. T. Wilson, 

Notary Public, Hamilton County, O. 
(seal.) 



Articles of Incorporation. 279 



The State of Ohio, County of Hamilton, ss.: 

I, Daniel J. Dalton, Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, a Court of Record 
within and for the County and State aforesaid, do hereby certify that it ap- 
pears of record in this office that Wm. J. T. Wilson, whose name is subscribed 
to the annexed instrument, was at the time of taking such proof, or acknowl- 
edgment, a Notary Public in and for said County, duly commissioned and 
qualified, and duly authorized to administer oaths, to take acknowledgments 
of deeds, etc. 

And further, that I am well acquainted with the handwriting of said 
Wm. J. T. Wilson, and verily believe that the signature to the said certificate 
or proof of acknowledgment, is genuine. I further certify that said instru- 
ment is executed and acknowledged according to the laws of this State. 

In testimony whereof , I have hereunto set my hand, and affixed the Seal 
of said Court, at Cincinnati, this 21st day of November, A. D., 1884. 

J ^ ^ ) Daniel J. Dalton. Clerk. 

I (.SEAL.j I gy Richard C. Rohner, Deputy. 



(Certificate under Section 906, Revised Statutes of the United States.) 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ) 

STATE OF OHIO, > 

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE. ) 

I, CLARENCE J. BROWN, Secretary of State oj the Slate of Ohio, do 
hereby certify that the foregoing is an exemplified copy, carefully compared 
by me with the original record now in my official custody as Secretary of 
State and found to be true and correct, of the Articles of Incorporation of 
The Woman's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, filed the 22d day of November, 1884, Volume 31. Page 242, of the 
Records of Incorporations. 

Witness my hand and official seal at 
Columbus, this 26th day of July, A. D., 1927. 
Clarence J. Brown. Secretary of State. 

[Signed! 




Historical Data 



ALASKA AND THE NORTHWEST— Jesse Lee Home, Seward, 1889, at Unalaska; 

moved to present location, 1925. 
Seward General Hospital, Seward, 1930. 
Lavinia Wallace Young Mission, Nome, 1913; affiliated with the Board of 

Home Missions, 1933. 
Maynard-Columbus Hospital, Nome, 1913. 
Unalaska Mission, Unalaska, 1903. 
Catherine Blaine Home, Seattle, Wash., 1912. 
Helen Kelly Manley Community Center, Portland, Ore., 1912, as Portland 

Settlement; became national, 1920. 
CALIFORNIA AND HAWAII— Angel Island, San Francisco, daily visitations 

since 1910. 
Chinese Home, San Francisco, 1893. 
Ellen Stark Ford Community Center, San Francisco, 1906, as Ellen Stark 

Ford Home; changed to community center, 1935. 
Frances DePauw School, Los Angeles, 1899. 
Susannah Wesley Home, Honolulu, T. H., 1899. 
CITY MISSIONS— CENTRAL— Campbell Settlement, Gary, Ind., 1914; became 

national, 1919. 
Marcy Center, Chicago, 111., 1930. 
Newberry Avenue Center, Chicago, 111, 1883, under joint administration with 

City Missions and Church Extension and the conference society; 1888, 

conference work; 1902, national. 
Peek Home, Polo, 111., 1916. 
CITY MISSIONS— CENTRAL WEST— East St. Louis Settlement, East St. 

Louis, 111., 1910; became national in 1920. 
Epworth School, Webster Groves, Mo., 1909; became national, 1920. 
Mothers' Jewels Home, York, Neb., 1890. 
CITY MISSIONS— EAST CENTRAL— Esther Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1891, as 

Glen Industrial Home; 1916, changed to Esther Hall. 
McCrum Community House, Uniontown, Pa., 1909, as McCrum Training 

School; 1929, changed to community center. 
CITY MISSIONS— FRIENDSHIP HOMES— Friendship Home, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

1920. 
Mothers' Memorial Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1920; name changed in 1935 from 

Friendship Day Nursery. 
CITY MISSIONS— NORTH EAST CENTRAL— Blodgett Community House, 

Hazleton, Pa., 1905, as joint project of Board of Home Missions and Central 

Pennsylvania Conference; became national, 1912. 
Italian Settlement, Utica, N. Y., 1906; became national, 1924. 
North Barre Community House, Barre, Vt., 1908; became national, 1923. 
CITY MISSIONS— WEST— Davis Deaconess Home, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1883, 

Davis Hall used in connection with seminary; 1886, converted into educa- 
tional and industrial home for girls; 1935, named Davis Deaconess Home; 

1906, removed to present location Davis Esther Hall, 1936. 
Esther Hall, Ogden, Utah, 1913, as Ogden Mission and Home for Working 

Girls; 1915, name changed to Sterling Hall; 1918, new property purchased 

and called Ogden Esther Home. 
Highland Boy Community House, Bingham Canvon, Utah, 1918; new building, 

1927. 
Iowa National Esther Hall, Des Moines, Iowa, 1931. 
HOSPITALS— Brewster Hospital, Jacksonville, Fla., 1901; new building, 1930. 
Medical Mission Dispensary, Boston, Mass., 1894. 
Sibley Memorial Hospital, Washington, D. C, 1894. 
INDIAN — Navajo Methodist Mission School, Farmington, N. M., 1890. 
Ponca Methodist Mission, Ponca City, Okla., 1887. 
Potawatomi Methodist Mission, Mayetta, Kan., 1903. 
Yuma Indian Mission, Yuma, Ariz., 1904, under auspices of National Indian 

Association; became national, 1907. 

280 



Historical Data. 281 

MEXICAN AND THE SOUTHWEST— Harwood Girls' School, Albuquerque, 

N. M., 1887. 
Rose Gregory' Houchen Settlement, El Paso, Texas, 1893, at Las Cruces, 

N. M.; moved to El Paso, 1898; building erected, 1912. Freeman Clinic, 

and Newark Conference Maternity Hospital, 1921; new building, 1937. 
Methodist Sanatorium, Albuquerque, N. M., 1912, as Harwood Deaconess 

Hospital; 1914, name changed to Methodist Deaconess Hospital. 

MOUNTAINEER— GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE— Deborah McCarty Settle- 
ment House, Cedartown, Ga., 1913. 
Ethel Harpst Home, Cedartown, Ga., 1923. 
Elizabeth Ritter Hall, Athens, Tenn., 1891. 

MOUNTAINEER— KENTUCKY, MISSISSIPPI, AND NORTH CAROLINA— 
Erie School and Aiken Hall, Olive Hill, Ky., Erie Home, 1913; Aiken Hall, 

1918; Erie School, 1926. 
Wood Junior College, Mathiston, Miss., 1885, local work, Woodlawn Seminary 
at Clarkson; 1893, The Woman's Home Missionary Society co-operated, 
and was called Industrial Home for Girls; 1897, became national; 1897, 
Dickson Home for Boys was erected; 1900, name changed to Bennett 
Academy; 1912, moved to Mathiston; 1930, became a junior college; 1935, 
name changed to Wood Junior College. 
PfeifFer Junior College, Misenheimer, N. C, 1903, at Cedar Valley; moved 
to Misenheimer, 1910. 

NEGRO— Eliza Dee Hall, Austin, Texas, 1904. 

E. L. Rust Hall, Holly Springs, Miss, 1884. 

Peck Hall, New Orleans, La., 1889. 

Thayer Hall, South Atlanta, Ga., 1881. 

Faith Community Center, New Orleans, La., 1915. 

Italian Kindergarten and Nursery School, New Orleans, La., 1887. 

Sager-Brown Home, Baldwin, La., 1921. 

Allen Home and School, Asheville, N. C, 1887. 

Browning Home and Mather Academy, Camden, S. C, 1886; became national, 
1890; 1928, new building. 

Boylan-Haven School, Jacksonville, Fla., 1885, Boylan Home and Industrial 
School, 1886; Haven Home at Savannah, Ga., 1882. Became Boylan- 
Haven School at Jacksonville, 1932. 

NEGRO— JOINT ADMINISTRATION WITH BOARD OF EDUCATION— 

Bennett College, Greensboro, N. C, 1926. 
PUERTO RICO AND NEW YORK— George O. Robinson School, San Juan, 
P. R., 1902. 

Hospital International, Santo Domingo, 1921. 

Alma Mathews House, New York City, 1888, as Immigrant Girls' Home; 
1929, changed to Alma Mathews House. 
REST HOMES— Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home, Ocean Grove, N. J., 1896. 

Robincroft, Pasadena, Calif., 1925. 

Chautauqua Mission House, Chautauqua, N. Y., 1921. 

Fenton Memorial Home, Chautauqua, N. Y., 1917. 

Thompson Rest Home, Mountain Lake Park, Md., 1899. 
THE NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL— Kansas City, Mo., 1899, as Fisk Train- 
ing School; 1904, name changed to Kansas City National Trammg School; 
reorganized in 1933. 
DISCONTINUED— City Missions— Unity Mission, Berwick, Pa., 1922; discon- 
tinued, 1936. 
Rock Springs Deaconess Center, Rock Springs, Wyo., 1915; closed, 1937. 

Mountaineer— Rebecca McClesky Hall, Boaz, Ala., 1904, taken over by the 
Board of Education. 

Negro— Adeline Smith Hall, Little Rock, Ark., 1883; discontmued, 1934. 

Training Schools— San Francisco National Training School, 1893; discontmued, 
1934. Iowa National Training School, Des Moines, Iowa, 1899; discon- 
tinued, 1931. McCrum Training School, Uniontown, Pa., 1909, now a 
community center. Lucy Webb Hayes National Trammg School, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1891; discontinued, 1935. 



282 



The Woman's Home Missionary Society. 



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PAGE 

Alaska and the Northwest 10, 32-33, 154-160 

Aldnch Deaconess Home and Esther Hall t^n oqh 

Allen Home and High School 49 9in 

Alma Mathews House \\ A' ojc 

Angel Island, U. S. Immigration Station ............'. 33' 162 

Annual Report of the Corresponding Secretary 84-91 

Annual Report of the Treasurer 92-10*? 

Apportionments Committee 7 

Appropriations 109-122 

Articles of Incorporation 278-279 

Assistant Editor and Editor of Annual Report 9 

Assistant to the Treasurer H 

Attorney 11 

Auditor H 93 

Awaiting Appointment, Deaconesses ........................ '59 

Baltimore Conference Work 47 231 

Baltimore Deaconess Home \\ \ \ 47' 231 

Bancroft-Taylor Rest Home ak! 99'i 

Bennett College .'.■.'.'.■.'.■.'.■ U U 217 

Bequest and Devise (form) ' ' 277 

Beulah Rest Home 47 231 

Bingham and Copperfield 37* 186 

Blodgett Memorial Community House 36* 183 

Board of Managers ' 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

Boylan-Haven School 42 208 

Brewster Hospital 38' 191 

Brooklyn Deaconess Home 52' 239 

Browning Home and Mather Academy 42 209 

Buffalo Deaconess Home and Settlement House ........... 49' 234 

Buffalo Friendship Home 49' 235 

Bureaus •••.••.. ■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■l0-ll,'l54-227 

Bureau Secretaries 10_ii, 152-227 

Busmess Committee 7 

By-Laws 251-261, 263-266," 267," 269,' '270-271, "275-276 

California and Hawaii 10, 33-34, 161-167 

Caliiornia Conference Work 47 231 

Campbell Settlement 34 169 

Catherine Blaine Home 33' 159 

Central, City Missions ".".".".'.".".".".'. io,' 'si^Sb,' 168-171 

Central New York Conference Work 47 232 

Central Pennsylvania Conference Work 4S 232 

Central West, City Missions 10, 35, 172-175 

Chautauqua Mission House '....'. 45 225 

Christian Citizenship 8 133 

Christian Citizenship Secretaries, Conference ' 23 

Chinese Bible Woman and Home Visitor SS 164 

Chinese Home 33' 153 

City Missions "...".'.'.'.'.".'.".".".'.■'.'. 10,' 'sLsi, ' 168-189 

Cleveland Deaconess Home and West Side Community House 52, 240 

Colorado Conference Work 48 233 

Conference Officei-s 15-31 

Conference Receipts for 1937-38 .'..'..'.'.... .104-107 

Constitution 249-250, 261-262, 266, 267, 268, 270, 271-274 

Corresponding Secretary 5,6, 82-89 

Corresponding Secretary-Emeritus ' . ' 5 

Corresponding Secretaries, Conference , , 16 

Crawford County Larger Parish ".!'.! 50, 236 

Cunningham Children's Home 49^ 235 

David and Margaret Home for Children 46, 245 

Davis Esther Hall j 37] 135 

Deaconesses , ,' , ' 58-60 

Deaconess Work, Personnel, Emergency, and Relief , 8* 134r-138 

284 



Index. 285 

PAGE 

Deaconesses in Stations 58 

Deborah McCarty Settlement House 40, 204 

Delaware Conference Work 48* 233 

Denominational Schools of Missions ' 12 

Departments 8, 123-132 

Detroit Conference Work 48, 233-234 

Detroit Deaconess Home 48, 233 

Detroit Esther Hall 49, 234 

Detroit Friendship Home 49, 234 

Disbursements for 1937-38 to Homes ancj Schools 108 

East Central, City Missions 10, 36, 176-179 

East St. Louis Settlement 35, 173 

Editor of Woman's Home Missions and General Publications 9, 150 

Editor of Junior Publications 9, 151 

Education and Personnel 8, 139-141 

Eliza Dee Hall 42, 211 

Elizabeth Ritter Hall 40, 201 

Elizabeth A. Bradley Children's Home 55, 244 

E. L. Rust Hall 43, 212 

Ellen Stark Ford Center 33, 161 

Engle Settlement House 57, 247 

Epworth School 35, 174 

Erie Conference Work 49, 234 

Erie School, Aiken Hall, and Walker Neighborhood House 41, 207 

Esther Hall, Chicago 55, 245 

Esther Hall, Cincinnati 36, 179 

Esther Hall, Ogden, Utah 37, 186 

Esther Hall, San Diego 46, 246 

Ethel Harpst Home 40, 203 

Faith Community Center 43, 215 

Fenton Memorial Home 45, 225 

Finance Methods 9, 142-144 

245 
242 
7 
166 
197 
242 
181 
233 



First Bohemian Methodist Episcopal Church 55 

Flower Esther Hall 53 

Forward Looking Committee 

Frances DePauw School 33 

Freeman Clinic and Newark Conference Maternity Hospital 39 

Friendly Center 54 

Friendship Home, Cincinnati 36 

Friendship Home, Philadelphia 48 

Friendship Homes, City Missions 10, 36, 180-181 

Genesee Conference Work 49, 234 

George 0. Robinson School 44, 219 

Georgia and Tennessee, Mountaineer 11, 40, 201-204 

Gilbert Academy 43, 213 

Girls' Club 51, 238 

Glenburn-Van Hook Mission 50, 235 

Guernsey Valley Parish 52, 240 

245 
241 
246 
232 
199 
239 
160 
187 
-281 
246 
247 
5 



Halsted Street Daily Vacation Bible School 55 

Harriet Ballou Day Nursery 53 

Harriet Campbell Esther Hall 56 

Harrisburg Deaconess Center 48 

Harwood Girls' School 40 

Hattie B. Cooper Community Center 51 

Helen Kelly Manley Community Center 33 

Highland Boy Community House 37 



Historical Data. 



280 



Holden Hospital kq ' k'r?' o^S 

HoUoway Deaconess Home Od, o ^ zw 

^S ':''^:''r""."'.l : : '. : : : : : ■. : : : •. : : : ■ : ■. : ■. : : ■• •■ ■■ ■■ •■ ■• : : : lo: si' 190-192 

Illinois Conference Work ! ! I ! lib.silM-lM 

Indian • ' r/> ooc 

Indiana Conference Deaconess Home ou, zdo 



Institutional Supplies 9 

Intel-denominational Schools and Camps 

Iowa National Esther Hall 37 

lowa-Des Moines Conference Work 50 

Irene Maitland Deaconess Home 49 

Italian Kindergarten and Nursery School 43 

Italian Methodist Episcopal Church, Altoona 48 

Italian Methodist Episcopal Churches, Portland 50 

Italian Mission, Elmira 47 

Italian Mission, Madison 57 

Italian Mission, Syracuse 47 

Italian Settlement 37 

Jane Couch Center 34 

Japanese Methodist Mission, Spokane 54 

Japanese Bible Woman 45 

Jefferson Park Parish 52 

Jesse Lee Home 32 

John Huss Methodist Episcopal Church 56 

Joint Administration with Board of Education, Negro 11, 44, 217 

Junior Department 8, 129-132 

Junior Conference Secretaries 21, 22 

Junior Neighbors and Junior Publications 9, 151, 153 

Kansas Conference Work 50, 236 

Kate Bilderback Neighborhood House 53, 241 

Kentucky, Mississippi, and North Carolina, Mountaineer. .. .11, 41, 205-207 

Kindergartens in Puerto Rico 44, 220 

Kulpmont Mission 48, 233 

Langleyville Settlement House 49, 235 

Lavinia Wallace Young Mission 32, 154 

Leadville, Colo 48, 233 

Leave of Absence — Deaconesses 59 

Leisenring No. 3 36, 178 

Lenten Offering 9, 142 

Lenten Offering Secretaries, Conference 24 

Leper Work 46, 229 

Lincoln Street Institutional Church 55, 245 

Literature Committee 9 

Louise Home for Babies 55, 244 

Maine Conference Work 50, 236 

Marcy Center 34, 170 

Margaret Evans Deaconess Home 48, 233 

Marysvale, Utah 37, 186 

Mary Todd Gambrill Neighborhood House 57, 248 

Maynard-Columbus Hospital 32, 155 

McCrum Community House 36, 176 

McKelvey Deaconess Home 54, 242 

Medical Mission Dispensai-y 38, 190 

Memoi'ial List 75 

Methodist Girls' Camps 13-14 

Methodist Hospital 56, 246 

Methodist Mexican Mission 50, 236 

Methodist Old People's Home 54, 242 

Methodist Sanatorium 40, 200 

Mexican and the Southwest 10, 39-40, 197-200 

Mexican Border Work 34, 165 

Mexican Missions, Lyons and Wichita 56, 246-247 

Michigan Conference Work 50, 237 

Migrants 230 

Minnesota Conference Work 51, 238 

Minnie Nay Settlement House 57, 247 

Minutes of the Board of Managers 62-75 

Ministerial Supplies 9, 146 

Missionary Education Secretaries, Conference 25 

Missouri Conference Work 51, 238 



Index. 287 

PAGE 

Mite Boxes 9, 142 

Mite Box Secretaries, Conference 26-27 

Morals Court of Pittsburgh 55, 244 

Mothers' Jewels Home 35, 175 

Mothers' Memorial Center 36, 180 

Motto 1 

Mount Carmel 48 

Mountaineer 11, 40-41, 201-207 

National Officers 282-283 

Navajo Methodist Mission School 39, 194 

238 
217 
244 
171 
238 
238 
239 
239 
239 
239 
239 
240 
182 
-184 
241 
241 
241 
241 



Nebraska Conference Work 51, 

Negro 11, 42-44, 208 

Neighborhood Center 55, 

Newberry Avenue Center 35, 

Newark Conference Work 51, 

Newark Deaconess Home 51, 

New England Conference Work 51, 

New England Southern Conference Work 51, 

New Jersey Conference Work 52, 

New Jersey Conference Deaconess Home 52, 

New York East Conference Work 52, 

North-East Ohio Conference Work 52, 

North Barre Community Center 36, 

North East Central, City Missions 10, 36-37, 182 

North Hammond Clinic 53 

North Indiana Conference Work 53 

Northwest Indiana Conference Work 53 

Northwest Iowa Conference Work 53 

Officers 5, 6 

Ohio Conference Work 53, 242 

Olney Rest Home 50, 237 

Oliver No. 1 36, 176 

Omaha City Mission 51, 238 

Oregon Conference Work 54, 242 

Oronogo, Mo 51, 238 

Pacific Northwest Conference Work 54, 243 

Pavillion Project 37, 188 

Pearl Street Community House 53, 240 

Peck Hall 43, 213 

Peek Home 35, 168 

Permanent Missionary Fund 9, 143 

Permanent Missionaiy Fund Secretaries, Conference 27, 28 

Pfeiffer Junior College 41, 205 

Philadelphia Conference Work 54, 243 

Philadelphia Deaconess Home and Settlement 54, 243 

Philadelphia Esther Hall 55, 243 

Pittsburgh Conference Work 55, 244 

Pittsbui'gh Deaconess Home 55, 244 

Pledges to National Work for 1937-38 106-107 

Ponca Methodist Mission 39, 195 

Potawatomi Methodist Mission 39, 196 

President 5, 6, 76-83 

Presidents, Conference 15 

Promotional Workers 9, 148-149 

Publications and Publicity 9, 150-153 

Publisher 9, 152-153 

Puerto Rico and New York 11, 44, 218-222 

Rebecca McCleskey Hall 202 

Rebecca Williams Community House 53, 240 

Recording Secretary 5, 6 

Recording Secretaries, Conference 17 

Rest Homes H, 45, 223-226 

Retired Deaconesses 60 

Retired Workers and On Leave of Absence 61 

Riddle Memorial Deaconess Home 57, 248 



288 Index. 

PAGE 

Riverside Community House 50, 236 

Robincrof t Rest Home 45, 224 

Rock River Conference Work 55, 245 

Rock Springs, Wyoming 37, 188 

Rose Gregory Houchen Settlement 39, 198 

Ruth M. Smith Children's Home 49, 234 

Sager-Brown Home 43, 214 

San Francisco Deaconess Work 47, 232 

Santo Domingo 45, 221 

Scholarships 10 

Schools of Missions 12-14, 146 

Scott's Run Settlement 57, 248 

Seward General Hospital 32, 157 

Sheffield Neighborhood Center 51, 238 

Shesler Deaconess Home, Shesler Hall 53, 241 

Sibley Memorial Hospital 38, 192 

Silver Lake Center 51, 239 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Work 46, 228 

South Side Settlement 54, 242 

Southern Calif oi-nia Conference Work 56, 245 

Southern Illinois Conference Work 56, 246 

Southwest Kansas Conference Work 56, 246 

Southwest Kansas Confei-ence Deaconess Home 56, 246 

Special Work 46, 228-230 

Spiritual Life 9, 145 

Spiritual Life Secretaries, Conference 28-29 

Standing Committees of the Board of Managers 8-9, 133-147 

Standing Committees of the Board of Trustees 7 

Student Work 8, 141 

Supplies 9, 146-147 

Supply Secretaries, Conf ei-ence 29-30 

Susannah Wesley Home 34, 167 

Swartzell Methodist Home for Children 47, 231 

Tacoma Community House 54, 243 

Thank Offering 9, 144 

Thank Offering Secretaries, Conference 30, 31 

Thayer Hall 43, 210 

The National Training School 11, 46, 227 

Thompson Rest Home 45, 226 

To Serve the Present Age 76-83 

Travelers' Aid 55, 244 

Treasurer 5, 6, 90-102 

Treasurers, Conference 18-19 

Treasury and Appropriations Committee 7 

Unalaska Mission 32, 158 

Upper Iowa Conference Work 56, 247 

Vice-Presidents 5, 6 

Washington Deaconess Home 47, 231 

Wesleyan Service Guild 8, 123 

Wesleyan Service Guild Secretaries, Conference 19-20 

West, City Missions 10, 37, 185-189 

West Virginia Conference Work 57, 247 

West Wisconsin Conference Work 57, 248 

Wilkeson Community House 54, 243 

Wilmington Conference Work 57, 248 

Wo-Ho-Mis Lodge 47, 231 

Woman's Home Missions and General Publications 9, 150, 152-153 

Wood Junior College 41, 206 

Workers in Conference Projects 47-57 

Workers in National Projects 32-46 

Wyoming Conference Children's Home 57, 248 

Young People's Department 8, 124-128 

Young People's Secretaries, Conference 20-21 

Yuma Indian Mission 39, 193